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Is a Hurricane forming in Michigan Right Now?

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posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 11:49 AM
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According to radar data from Intellicast
www.intellicast.com...\
and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration RADAR in
Muskegan Michigan radar.weather.gov...
There is a well formed eye within a low pressure center forming as I type. If anyone knows how to get a screen shot of this and post it, I would appreciate the contribution.
Check it out before it goes away.


[edit on 4-8-2010 by Violater1]




posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 11:56 AM
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More precisely, if someone can get the loop and post it, it will display the circular counter clock wise rotation around the eye.



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 11:58 AM
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No, it's not a hurricane.

It's just a big thunderstorm.



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 11:58 AM
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It does appear to have an eye. I will keep my eye on this 1.
2nd



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by Junkheap
No, it's not a hurricane.

It's just a big thunderstorm.





How do you explain the rotation around the eye? Or did you miss it?



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:01 PM
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It's not possible for a hurricane to form over land. I can see where you might think of it as forming an eyewall, but look at the motion. No rotation, just a pulling from east to west.

Definitely not a hurricane.



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:02 PM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
It does appear to have an eye. I will keep my eye on this 1.
2nd




Agreed!
You have to use the LOOP feature in NOAA or the PLAY feature in Intellicast to view the rotation around.
A star 4 U.
Thanks for the verification.



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:04 PM
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Originally posted by unityemissions
It's not possible for a hurricane to form over land. I can see where you might think of it as forming an eyewall, but look at the motion. No rotation, just a pulling from east to west.
Definitely not a hurricane.




A hurricane can't form over land?
Source please.
When I began to watch this, there was definitely rotation around the eye.



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by Violater1
 


No problem, I never seen thunder storms formed like that on radar, but I am not a meteorologist. Wonder what it looks like from the ground , that would be a nice pic to see..



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:05 PM
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Its not a hurricane its simply a low pressure system. All low pressure systems have a central point or eye where the rest of the system rotates around.

Its literally impossible for a hurricane to form over land or small bodies of water. There is not enough heated water. There's a reason why all severe tropical storms (hurricanes, cyclone and typhoons) originate over oceans, and dont start decaying until they move over land or cold water



[edit on 4/8/2010 by OzWeatherman]



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:05 PM
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Just because it has an "eye" does not make it a hurricane.

Otherwise it is just a cloud / moisture formation.

Hurricanes cannot form over land.

What you are seeing is a Doppler radar signature which is rainfall. and the "eye" is an area where there is no rain.

You can keep an eye on this as much as you like, but you will not see a hurricane form.

Maybe some tornados, hail, lightning, heavy rain. maybe even a water spout or two. But not a large system of low pressure that can be classes anywhere near that of a Hurricane. Anything else is just rough weather.

nice try at panic though!



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:06 PM
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While it is interesting to watch, it is not a hurricane.

In fact if you got to the Weather Channel and go to maps, you can use their 'Future' feature to see what will happen next, the 'eye' goes away fairly quickly.

Bad storm yes, hurricane no.

www.weather.com


[edit on 4-8-2010 by lasertaglover]



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by JakiusFogg
 


Not saying a hurricane shall form just saying, I will keep an eye on it to see its activities-k-
2nd

[edit on 8/4/10 by Ophiuchus 13]



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:08 PM
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Also just to comfirm. on your link to Intellicast. please select cloud on the layers, and look again at the system.

Its just a blanket of clout with rain in it!

simples



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by Violater1
 


Pretty much common sense, man.


The term "cyclone" refers to such storms' cyclonic nature, with counterclockwise rotation in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise rotation in the Southern Hemisphere. Depending on its location and strength, a tropical cyclone is referred to by names such as hurricane, typhoon, tropical storm, cyclonic storm, tropical depression, and simply cyclone. While tropical cyclones can produce extremely powerful winds and torrential rain, they are also able to produce high waves and damaging storm surge as well as spawning tornadoes. They develop over large bodies of warm water, and lose their strength if they move over land. This is why coastal regions can receive significant damage from a tropical cyclone, while inland regions are relatively safe from receiving strong winds. Heavy rains, however, can produce significant flooding inland, and storm surges can produce extensive coastal flooding up to 40 kilometres (25 mi) from the coastline. Although their effects on human populations can be devastating, tropical cyclones can also relieve drought conditions. They also carry heat and energy away from the tropics and transport it toward temperate latitudes, which makes them an important part of the global atmospheric circulation mechanism. As a result, tropical cyclones help to maintain equilibrium in the Earth's troposphere, and to maintain a relatively stable and warm temperature worldwide.
Wiki

I mean, have you EVER heard of a hurricane forming over land





[edit on 4-8-2010 by unityemissions]



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


So what you are really saying is that you believe there is a POTENTIAL hurricane system forming over the land mass of Southern Michigan?

Is that what your going to monitor!?

Well happy hunting



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:13 PM
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Landcane:

A land-cane begins as a cluster of thunderstorms, similar to that of a hurricane. However, the landcane develops over land hence it's name. This cluster of thunderstorms develops and intensifies off of what ever source its drawing its lift and energy from. For example... there could be a vorticity max aloft (upper level disturbance between 15,000 and 20,000 ft.) or a jetstreak creating the lift that is needed. As this cluster continues to grow and develop, eventually enough latent heat is released into the atmosphere that the pressures within this cluster begin to fall. Once the pressures fall a mini circulation develops and a landcane forms.

Example:




posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:13 PM
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Looks like the usual front moving down the corridore
not to say it won't form some twisters though

It like it is a regular type pattern with some heavy weather in it.



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:14 PM
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Originally posted by JakiusFogg
reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


So what you are really saying is that you believe there is a POTENTIAL hurricane system forming over the land mass of Southern Michigan?

Is that what your going to monitor!?

Well happy hunting


Not even man, I just said I would pay attention to it as I do many other weather related situations.. Calm down I know how hurricans are formed and know what it takes to create them.. I am after all an inteligent individual. And chill with the attempts at making me out to be some sort of panic causein fear mongering attention whore YOUR READS ON ME ARE WRONGE -K- So actually that is WHAT YOU ARE SAYING


[edit on 8/4/10 by Ophiuchus 13]



posted on Aug, 4 2010 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by SoulDarkness
 


A landcane is a made up word, and not recognised by any weather bureau I know of(including mine). The definition you provided pretty much describes a low pressure system forming

[edit on 4/8/2010 by OzWeatherman]



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