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Invoking Power Through Verbal Exertion! Hiiyah!

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posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 05:47 PM
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This is something I was thinking about yesterday while playing outside. I was totally acting like a kid, playing with sticks and fallen branches. I had this one stick, and I threw another stick up into the air, and I would use one stick as a sword and smack the other stick while it was in the air.

I found that when I said something like ,"HIYAAAAA!!!" My sword swings would be harder...

It got me thinking. Does saying certain phrases help to invoke power from within?

Think about it. Tennis players make all kinds of weird noises while hitting the tennis ball.

It also brought to mind Karate. The Karate people say all kinds of phrases while delivering a punch or kick, and these phrases each correspond to a certain attack.

I found all this to be very intriguing, and was wondering if you have anything to add to this topic. Thank you.

-Sol




posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 05:51 PM
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reply to post by SolarE-Souljah
 


When I was (briefly) studying Kung Fu, my sifu would make sure we yelled when we punched or kicked. It helps with energy, as well with breathing because it forces you to exhale when you hit the object you are aiming for, a lot of people don't know how to breathe properly when you are exercising. It helps clear the mental and emotional cobwebs as well.

As for your swing becoming harder, who knows....I'm a fan of Dune so I believe it could be possible to topple things with words.



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 06:17 PM
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I also verbally exert while rising from the couch or bed.

Something about breathing in a certain way really helps me.

This also come into play during exercise. Can someone remind me? Is it breathe in while working the muscle, then exhale while releasing the muscle? is that right?

Thanks.

-Sol



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by SolarE-Souljah
 




Does saying certain phrases help to invoke power from within?


Mantra



The Karate people say all kinds of phrases while delivering a punch
or kick, and these phrases each correspond to a certain attack.


...sort of. Depending on your school. In my experience, most karate schools accept any kind of yell, no matter how silly. I've only seen kendo instructors insist on particular sounds for particular types of attack.



when I said something like ,"HIYAAAAA!!!"
My sword swings would be harder


In principal, I would expect that any "ahhh" sound would be appropriate for an attack because of its apparent relation to masculine action.

Try this: swing your sword with an "ahh" sound, then swing it with an "oh" sound. If you examine the experience closely, you may find a qualitative difference between the two.



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by SolarE-Souljah
 




Can someone remind me? Is it breathe in while working the muscle,
then exhale while releasing the muscle? is that right?


No. Other way around. Exhale on exertion. But you don't need to venture into metaphysics here. Inhaling during heavy exertion is an excellent way to injure yourself.



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by canuckistanian
 




I'm a fan of Dune so I believe it could be
possible to topple things with words.


Destroying things with sound is a well established phenomenon.

Even Mythbusters gave it a confirmed result.



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 06:29 PM
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In weight lifting, you are supposed to breathe in when lowering the weight, and exhale while lifting.

You naturaly exhale when doing something really strenuous, or exerting lots of force.

Is the sound producing more power ??? Or is the sound the natural result of using more force ?? Perhaps when you consciously choose to make this sound, ... you also consciously choose to add a little oomph.

Words have always had power, we use them everyday, we say " I feel this way" " i feel that way"

You can also use these words to influence other people's actions...... for example, ... if I wanted someone to give me all of their money, ... I would simply tell them " This is a mofo robbery !!! give me all your money before I blow your godamn head off "

lol



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by SolarE-Souljah
 


A projection of Intent !

Psychological warfare .





===============================================
To get struck in the midsection during an inhalation is something you don`t forget in a hurry.



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 07:07 PM
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I totally forgot the obvious example of singing.

Singing can be a very powerful thing for the singer and for the audience.

A lot can be accomplished with verbal exertion. I like that term alot.

-Sol



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 07:13 PM
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According to this Japanese Master, the "kiai" sound

we use in martial arts , can sometimes be deadly ..



[edit on 3-8-2010 by samsamm9]



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 08:03 PM
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Sorry had too!

Star and flag because it works!


[edit on 3-8-2010 by Big Raging Loner]



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by samsamm9
 




According to this Japanese Master, the "kiai" sound
we use in martial arts , can sometimes be deadly ..


Sure. But when it comes to martial arts, like with much of life, it's sometimes useful to be able to distinguish the "mystic" from the "load of bunk."

This kiai master comes to mind:




[edit on 3-8-2010 by LordBucket]



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 10:40 PM
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Lordbucketmeister,

I tried the strike with a "ha"! and a "ho" and there was a noticeable difference in how much mana and power was behind the strike. "Ha" has much stronger in my opinion. Intriguing stuff.

-Sol



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 11:25 PM
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reply to post by SolarE-Souljah
 




I tried the strike with a "ha"! and a "ho"
"Ha" has much stronger in my opinion


"Stronger?"

To use the classic example, which is stronger, that sword you're swinging, or water? It might hurt more to have the sword swung at your face than a handful of water, but your sword will never wear down a mountain like water can.

It's not that ahh is "stronger" so much as that it's more appropriate for this particular task.



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 06:40 AM
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Hey Solare,

In Akido, we used two types of tonal variations, one from the stomach to physically move around quickly, and another from the throat to perform quick grabs. The difference when using these techniques compared to not using them was quite dramatic.

In a way, It seems just thinking about making the noises signals an intent that allows our bodies to move with greeter precision or less energy then without using them.

Possibly the noises are linked to a movement (say a grunt while getting up from the couch) With repetition these two actions (the grunt and getting off the couch) are linked together. Performing this noise lets our brains know what is coming next – the physical movement - and allows it to efficiently control those muscle groups to make the task seem easier.

Anyhow, just a theory. Nothing to back it up


Cheers
Shane



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 07:01 AM
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Originally posted by shamus78
Performing this noise lets our brains know what is coming next


Wow, that is an amazing way of saying it and it totally makes sense!

Thank you very much for your contribution.

-Sol



posted on Aug, 5 2010 @ 07:13 AM
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Hi again,

Forgot this, I use it a lot to remember stuff years later. When you want to remember something, think of a physical location you've been to while also thinking of the info you want to remember, and you'll have no problems remembering whatever even years into the future.
For the rest of my life, a backpackers kitchen I used to cook in will always be linked to the word "kite". It works really well.

It reinforces the link to that memory, so if it degrades (like short term memory will), there's a backup link that is accessed thru the location memory. Or something like that. This also works when performing physical movement. I'd recommend HUMAN MEMORY AND THE CONCEPT OF REINFORCEMENT* by Richard C. Atkinson



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