Test The Rain Project

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posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 11:30 PM
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edit on 11-3-2011 by paxnatus because: wrong thread




posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:16 AM
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I needed to move this post to the top of the page.........


Originally posted by Cloudsinthesky
After carefully deliberation, we have released testing results from the initial samples and as promised.....I will share with those who still follow the Gulf crises. I will post a couple paragraphs of the research article here. Although the Gulf issue here on ATS is rather dead, it is still very real for those who it affects.........and it may just affect you in the near future.......


The second organic identified in the Missouri rain sample, Ecgonine Methyl Ester (EME), has a more interesting history. It is the final metabolite of Cocaine. The EME molecule itself is inactive and does not pose any threat to the population or environment. The greater question is how does a primary metabolite of coc aine come to be found in rain water from a system that was spawned in the Gulf of Mexico?



These facts are compelling. There has been a lot of speculation that a genetically engineered microbe was released into the Gulf waters to combat the oil spill. No evidence has been presented substantiating these claims by the scientific community. Could our discovery of the coc aine metabolite EME be the key evidence of such a microbial introduction?



The evidence we do have suggests that coc aine was metabolized in the gulf waters and our research shows that it’s the perfect catalyst for microbial growth. It appears that we may have stumbled upon a key clue from our rain samples tested.


testtherain.com...








posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:53 AM
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Thank you, Clouds, for posting the results here; i know you and Pax have worked really hard on this.

What a strange thing for them to have found in rainwater. O.o

Will check the website for more information.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by Cloudsinthesky
 


Clouds and Pax, and everyone else.
Thank you for all of your hard work, and dedication to bring the truth to us here on ATS.

Its rare these days to get the truth...it takes caring people, and this is rarer everyday.
May you both be blessed for your efforts!



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 12:08 PM
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The evidence we do have suggests that coc aine was metabolized in the gulf waters and our research shows that it’s the perfect catalyst for microbial growth. It appears that we may have stumbled upon a key clue from our rain samples tested.


That's certainly an interesting suggestion. Do you have any conclusive evidence, or just guesses?

Be patient with me, I'm not a chemist, but what if all that coc aine being shipped from south america via the gulf has something to do with it? Okay, that's a joke. But I'd be interested to know if you have more than just speculation....

Thanks!



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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reply to post by incrediblelousminds
 


Hey thanks incredible for looking at this post........

Because of the Japan issue there is little to no focus now on the Gulf............It might of been poor timing to release such results.

I only brought a couple paragraphs over to ATS............It goes into greater detail of "how" we know coc aine as a energy source was used in the gulf..........We can't prove its application purpose........But I think if you connect the dots it will give you the answer......

Take a look at the complete article



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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Chem trails?
just maybe they put this stuff in the air?
to dope out the people?



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by buddha
 


We could only wish so.........



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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So, to clarify, you guys never found any evidence that there is oil or any compounds from the crude found in the rain?

That WAS the initial point, right?

So we can now officially consider ourselves correct if we thought the notions was highly unlikely, and the videos alleging such were complete nonsense?



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by incrediblelousminds
 


It is apparent that you are not familiar with the projects mission. I will be glad to answers any question that are relevant to our disclosure.

To answer your question …”No” we did not find oil in the rain……….Compounds relating to the oil industry….”Yes”………




About
August 2, 2010 By admin Leave a Comment (Edit)
Test The Rain Project originated out of concern due to the dispersants being used in the BP gulf oil spill. The EPA along with the Coast Guard provided little oversight over the decisions being made by BP. It was estimated that 1.8 million gallons of dispersant, mainly corexit 9500, had been sprayed into the gulf. Many conflicting reports have come out of the gulf area concerning all aspects of the spill.

Attempting to understand the environmental and health risk associated with the gulf oil spill only raised more unanswered questions. Finding those answers from BP or other Governmental agencies only raised a vale over the spill.

We all have the right to know the truth of how this event will effect the environment and our health. To find the truth we have established this project to test rain samples for potential toxins due to the gulf spill. This research will use multiple independent labratories for testing. The data collected through this project will be presented without governmental or corporate influence.

Test The Rain Project
August 2, 2010 By admin Leave a Comment (Edit)
The Projects mission is to test the rain for dispersant and chemical compounds derived from the BP gulf oil
disaster. Our goal is to create a collection method that will reduce the risk for sample contamination and
protocols for testing that will be accepted by the scientific community.
edit on 19-3-2011 by Cloudsinthesky because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2012 @ 10:57 PM
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Originally posted by Cloudsinthesky



These facts are compelling. There has been a lot of speculation that a genetically engineered microbe was released into the Gulf waters to combat the oil spill. No evidence has been presented substantiating these claims by the scientific community. Could our discovery of the coc aine metabolite EME be the key evidence of such a microbial introduction?


Looks like your testtherain site is down now.

I was just reading through this and some related threads, and this part about microbes grabbed my attention, because i was just reading through some old smithsonains from 2010, and in an article about the gulf spill, they interviewed a scientist named Ralph Portier, an environmental biologist from Louisiana State, who does a lot of that sort of things on spill sites, and wanted to introduce some into the Gulf to deal with the spill.


Ralph Portier paces impatiently along the edge of Barataria Bay, on the inland shore of Grand Isle. He is a boyish-faced man whose rounded initial t’s give away his Cajun heritage. “I want to get to work so bad,” he says. Portier, an environmental biologist at Louisiana State, specializes in bioremediation—the use of specialized bacteria, fungi and plants to digest toxic waste.

Bioremediation gets little public attention, and fiddling with the ecosystem does carry risks, but the technique has been used for decades, quietly and often effectively, to help clean up society’s most stubborn messes. Portier has used bioremediation on sites ranging from a former mothball factory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to a 2006 Citgo spill near Lake Charles, Louisiana, in which two million gallons of waste oil flowed into a nearby river and bayou following a violent storm.

He has collected promising organisms from all over the world, and labels on the samples of microorganisms in his lab freezers and refrigerators betray a litany of disasters. “Name a Superfund site, and it’s in there,” he says. All but the most toxic of toxic waste sites have their own naturally occurring suite of microorganisms, busily chewing away at whatever was spilled, dumped or abandoned.

Sometimes Portier simply encourages these existing organisms by adding the appropriate fertilizers; other times he adds bacterial reinforcements. Portier points out that other oil-spill cleanup techniques—booms, shovels, skimmers, even paper towels—may make a site look better but leave a toxic residue. The rest of the job is usually accomplished by oil-eating bacteria (which are already at work on the BP spill) digesting the stuff in marshes and at sea. Even in a warm climate like the Gulf coast, the “bugs,” as Portier calls them, can’t eat fast enough to save the marsh grasses—or the entire web of other plants and animals affected by the spill. But he thinks his bugs could speed the natural degradation process and make the difference between recovery and disappearance for a great deal of oily marshland.

Desperate to give it a try, he is waiting for permits to test his technique. He says his biological reactors, large black plastic tanks sitting idle at the water’s edge, could make some 30,000 gallons of bacterial solution a day—enough to treat more than 20 acres—at a cost of about 50 cents a gallon. “I really think I could help clean this thing up,” he says.

Read more: www.smithsonianmag.com...


www.smithsonianmag.com...



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