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Sea Going Nessie??

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posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 07:23 PM
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A new Nessie wantabe has been photographed just 30 yards off the Devon coast. At first they thought it might be a sea turtle?? I have never seen a sea turtle that I would confuse with a dinosour.

"A typical plesiosaur had a long neck, four large flippers, short pointed tail and ranged from two metres to 20 metres long."




This is a small picture, but you can go to the site for a really huge one. Unfortunately, it's a Nessieblob.

www.thisisplymouth.co.uk...
What say all of you wise cryptologists?



[edit on 8/2/2010 by zachi]




posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 07:51 PM
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can animals be both fresh water and salt water?

2nd



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 09:23 PM
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Isn't this being talked about just 5-6 threads down?



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 05:56 AM
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The ocean is one of the most undiscovered places of our world, who is to say dinosours are extinct?

maybe they are just rare and live in the deepest parts of our ocean

perhaps this is a dinosour that existed



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 06:50 AM
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www.abovetopsecret.com...

Already a thread here, but really it is kind of hard to tell by the photo's. It could be anything.



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 07:14 AM
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reply to post by Totalstranger
 


yes of course they can
look at salmon and trout
i know they are fish but.....................



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 08:05 AM
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It's Morgawr. It was first spotted in 1906.
en.wikipedia.org...
www.ufodigest.com...



posted on Aug, 3 2010 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


Oops, I didn't look far enough down the page. Nessie was the first cryptid I learned about. I don't know what's out there, but it sure is facinating.

There are many things in the oceans we have not yet discovered.



posted on Aug, 14 2010 @ 01:11 AM
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reply to post by Totalstranger
 


Hey its my first post.. yay! anywho. I remember seeing a few things that are both fresh water and salt water fish. I am going to reference a what i found.

"For most fish, they would die. But some, like eels and salmon, can move
freely between the two at certain stages of their lives. To do this they have special
mechanisms of excretion and absorption of salt and water.--ProfBill" (website) www.newton.dep.anl.gov...

Now i thought snake head fish would be the same but i did some research they are fresh water fish that can travel on land. Pretty scary imo. But i know there is a shark out there that is both. But for the life of me i cant remember its name! bah. but yes some can



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 12:30 PM
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Another cliche' blurry sea creature surrounded in myth and lore.

Listen, the images (now I use the term images lightly) can show one of many of the ridiculous numbers of existing forms of sea life. And it's obvious that nearly all of those animals would be more probable than a surviving prehistoric marine reptile. just because a blurry photo shows up out of nowhere doesn't mean we have discovered a prehistoric survivor, come on people.

Tell me how many photos that look almost identical to these have been debunked? and not just by professional photo analysts but by you?

denying these photos as any proof of a prehistoric marine reptile is not ignorant, it's realistic.



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 12:32 PM
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Originally posted by Kroggin
reply to post by Totalstranger
 
Now i thought snake head fish would be the same but i did some research they are fresh water fish that can travel on land. Pretty scary imo. But i know there is a shark out there that is both. But for the life of me i cant remember its name! bah. but yes some can


That's a Bull Shark mate



posted on Aug, 19 2010 @ 06:47 PM
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I think that the Loch Ness Monster is most likely deceased. RIP Nessie!



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