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Canadian earnings, U.S. jobs numbers to motivate North American stock markets

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posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 08:33 PM
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www.cbc.ca...


Keeping The Lie Alive.



Market estimates predict U.S. non-farm payrolls to slide by about 60,000, which would keep the unemployment rate steady at 9.5 per cent, according to CIBC World Markets. The data is slated to be released Friday.


interesting statement


"People don't care if governments are creating jobs," he said in an interview.


Which jobs you might say?




The U.S. really does "need to see those private job numbers going, because the more confidence you have, the more hiring you have, the more earnings individuals are getting and it just falls into place," he added.






In Canada, the jobs market is nowhere near as dire, with jobs rising to levels that near the employment peak before the recession. The climb has been losing steam, though, and will likely show further signs of slowing down in July.







15,000 new jobs will be added, which would keep the unemployment rate steady at 7.9 per cent.


15,000 PART TIME Jobs only people.


So once again we are lied about the real job rate of the job market, they are only showing the private job numbers rate, not the real rate of the job market in north america.


So anyone here have any thoughts.




posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 11:25 PM
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Originally posted by Agent_USA_Supporter



In Canada, the jobs market is nowhere near as dire, with jobs rising to levels that near the employment peak before the recession. The climb has been losing steam, though, and will likely show further signs of slowing down in July.


[...]

So once again we are lied about the real job rate of the job market, they are only showing the private job numbers rate, not the real rate of the job market in north america.


So anyone here have any thoughts.


In the USA, we're projected to reach pre-recession employment levels 5-13 years from now -- if we don't double-dip. That's a total of nearly 8-16 years from the start of the "recession" -- if we don't double-dip.

How this isn't widely being called a Depression is beyond me.


[edit on 1-8-2010 by theWCH]



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