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Is your home network secure, or open to hacker?

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posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 09:20 PM
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reply to post by Helig
 


I totally agree with you. That is exactly why I started this thread explaining my own experience. I sure focused about IP network security as I got broken in recently due to a (very stupid) mistake by my part.

Online human behaviour sure is the weakest link in security these days.




posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 09:29 PM
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OP, in case you were not already aware~

you should go into your preferences menu, into "startup applications"
and uncheck "remote desktop"
and anything else that sounds remotely close.

then I would remove anything that has to do with remote desktop/remote anything, from your menus. So they are not even visible. lol

I am still amazed by how many people I talk to
(that still use windoze-*only a few*) lol
who have no idea what the remote desktop/ remote access feature is, or that it is turned on by default in windoze.

*yet they have used it numerous times to let the MS people control their PC's to help them 'set it up". * lol


[edit on 1-8-2010 by Ahmose]



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 09:40 PM
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You should really get a hardware firewall/consumer grade router so you don't have to worry about configuring your software firewall and worrying about what programs automatically open ports on it, which is a big security concern with software firewalls - malware and other programs can allow any traffic through your firewall without you knowing it.

OP, who exactly logged onto a remote desktop session and what user/system account did they use? Do you even know? Did you get an IP address?

Are you sure this was an individual and not a system process?



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 09:43 PM
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reply to post by Ahmose
 


My oldest son swears to Linux and that Ubuntu thing. Youngest son even walked me through it once. We made my largest computer a dual boot system.

You ever heard that an old dog can't learn a new trick. I didn't believe it either....until... You know, I've used MS since Windows had DOS 3.0 and they stole the OS from a company named GeoWorks.

I've tried Linux, I refuse to upgrade above XP. It just has that warm fuzzy. My wife is going nuts over her laptop with MS 7. She's already filled a 250 gig HD and doesn't have a clue what's on it. My kids tell me and her the same thing I told them for years. You'll figure it out, that's how you learn.

I think Hellig may be on to something about new computers and new OS.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 09:52 PM
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reply to post by RestingInPieces
 


I do have a hardware firewall, with Deep Packet Inspection, QOS and all the goodies. The trick is, that Remote Desktop software have a little box saying configure your network to make it works (in french, I speak french). Thinking it would open ports on the Linux firewall I checked it, but what it really does is using uPNP to configure your router and expose port 5900, which I was sure was not opened to the world.

I just disabled uPNP and the VNC server. Still using sshd from inside the network.

I consider myself an advanced user (used to administrate a small corporate network with WAFS and VOIP over VPN across Canada...). That show how solid translation, good labeling and tooltips can be important.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by hinky
 


lol, yeah man, my dad was the same way... forever!
stubborn old man! lol :p

I really couldnt believe he picked it up soo quick.
and I have only had to drive up there like 3-4 times to help him....
in like 6 months! lol

Now he says... " I cant believe i didnt do this sooner! lol
and " maan, I never thought i would get out from under M$'s thumb!"

and " I always thought switching to linux would be soo much harder!" lol

now he swears by Ubuntu and is even getting his friends to switch.
He is a hard headed judge, and his mind is not very open....
if he can do it.. I think you could! lol

I even installed Ubuntu on 3 of the court computers and they are starting to use it in the town hall for a few things. woot! lol

Our observatory is also getting interested in it now that I forced them to check it out at a meeting.



i agree on the XP thing though,
if i was forced to use M$ again, it would be XP..
anything after that is pure crap.
lol



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 10:04 PM
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reply to post by hinky
 


The user experience... we get really accustomed to it. I used XP all along until Vista came out. That is when I migrated to Linux. It feels weird at first but the learning curve is really not what it used to be.

Overall I found that:
-It is easier to install the system
-Simpler to install common programs
-Runs most windows software anyway through Wine (Photoshop CS2 here)
-Supports most software out of the box

If the user experience is dragging you, try to make it look like Windows.
Here is a discussion I came across that may help you with that : ubuntuforums.org...



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 10:05 PM
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Originally posted by hinky
reply to post by Ahmose
 


My oldest son swears to Linux and that Ubuntu thing. Youngest son even walked me through it once. We made my largest computer a dual boot system.

You ever heard that an old dog can't learn a new trick. I didn't believe it either....until... You know, I've used MS since Windows had DOS 3.0 and they stole the OS from a company named GeoWorks.

I've tried Linux, I refuse to upgrade above XP. It just has that warm fuzzy. My wife is going nuts over her laptop with MS 7. She's already filled a 250 gig HD and doesn't have a clue what's on it. My kids tell me and her the same thing I told them for years. You'll figure it out, that's how you learn.

I think Hellig may be on to something about new computers and new OS.


Windows is not inherently less secure than any Linux distribution or vice versa.

The problem is with the consumer. They want everything easy.

Case in point: Windows has security vulnerabilities precisely to make it usable by the common every day computer user who doesn't want to even think about security. This is all done for the "stupid" user.

Now, what happens when the "stupid" user figures out that the OS isn't secure and they decide that they want a secure OS for whatever reason?

Instead of actually LEARNING how to lock-down their system, what do they do?

They would rather go for a system that is already secured for the "stupid" user.

The problem isn't the OS at all, but the stupid lazy user.

The same people who would blindly take Linux as a secure OS are the same people who spend an extra $3500 on a car because it has a $650 dollar feature included off the lot.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 10:11 PM
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Oh I almost forgot...

Those saying : But Linux do not run my game... Get a console, it's cheaper than most gaming video cards!



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 10:25 PM
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i had turned on my firewall for my Ubuntu machine (the house cpu). On my laptop i use Kaspersky, and trust that it will provide me my protection. Of course, it is turned off when not in use.

my sons laptop is using the mcafee crap that it came with for 15 months. thats his problem. i bought the machine, its his now.


but on my ubuntu machine i have never even considered security, outside of enabling the basic built in firewall.

perhaps i will look into it tomorrow evening. we will see.

But my router is very unsecure. i live in a town where no one knows anything outside of the mundane. Small town, small minds. There isn't even another wifi available in my area (for several blocks in all directions).



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 10:31 PM
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Originally posted by gagol
reply to post by RestingInPieces
 


I do have a hardware firewall, with Deep Packet Inspection, QOS and all the goodies. The trick is, that Remote Desktop software have a little box saying configure your network to make it works (in french, I speak french). Thinking it would open ports on the Linux firewall I checked it, but what it really does is using uPNP to configure your router and expose port 5900, which I was sure was not opened to the world.

I just disabled uPNP and the VNC server. Still using sshd from inside the network.

I consider myself an advanced user (used to administrate a small corporate network with WAFS and VOIP over VPN across Canada...). That show how solid translation, good labeling and tooltips can be important.


Oh, I thought you were using RDP, haha. No big deal. Yes, you should ALWAYS disable uPnP while you are changing the default password. Having it enabled virtually transforms your hardware firewall into a software firewall as far as I look at it. I don't think there is any general authentication method when uPnP is enabled as well, so it is a very bad protocol to have enabled if you are worried about security.

It's just another feature that was created without much forethought for security to make the user experience easier. As a general rule, anything that makes the user experience easier is probably a security concern.

VNC itself is pretty insecure and probably should not be used over the internet anyway unless you have a VPN with IPsec.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 10:32 PM
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reply to post by gagol
 


My home computer is not secure. I do not pay bills on it, have never entered my ss# or any other personal info. I don't worry about it.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 10:55 PM
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I have been running Ubuntu for about a year and a half and I love it. I only have one MS box anymore just to run a few things there is no package for that I am too lazy to figure out how to run on ubuntu. I run fire starter for a fire wall and I don't do any remote anything. It is the most trouble free OS I have ever had. One of these days when I get around to it I will be completely MS free!

I may look into Bastille it never hurts to add a layer of protection.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 12:02 AM
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Originally posted by gagol
reply to post by buddhasystem
 


I guess that depends of your router... I did not do it. There is some balance of usability I want to retain.

But just for you, and all ATS friends, I checked on my router.

I went to Advanced, Network filter, and there is an option to turn MAC filtering on and enter the MAC address's.


Oh, so you didn't use this option at all. Some of my smarter friends say you must.

It's quite hard to counterfeit the MAC. I also own a D-Link model (slightly more higher end) and I feel I'm in control. If you had an intrusion, you really have only one person to thank, which is yourself.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 07:28 AM
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reply to post by buddhasystem
 



MAC address filtering for wireless networking isn’t real “security”. Anyone who pays any attention to current trends in wireless security at all should know that MAC filtering is less effective than WEP — and that WEP can be cracked almost instantly these days with commonly available tools.
...
Don’t rely on MAC filtering alone [...] It doesn’t take much determination at all to spoof a MAC address. In fact, I’ll tell you how:

1. “Listen” in on network traffic. Pick out the MAC address. This can be done with a plethora of freely available security tools, including Nmap.
2. Change your MAC address.

Source:blogs.techrepublic.com.com...

It is more annoying for you add devices to your network, than it is to fake one of your over the air! Use WPA2 (Not WEP), it is very hard to get through that.

[edit on 2-8-2010 by gagol]



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 08:32 AM
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Originally posted by hinky
I have a unique situation at my house. I have 4 computers, 2 of which never "sees" the internet and two who are internet bound, then another 2 computers for the wife, and another 5 computer between both my daughters. That's 11 computers at any given moment, then , THEN, I have my boys over and their laptops which can tie into the wireless.



You sound a lot like my house hold.

nice one. You can never have enough processors in my opinion.

I have a network entertainment centre I built using old p4 machines to stream media to each and every room in the house.

P4 components are now so cheap it's silly, an intelp4 2ghz on a sff motherboard with shared memory for on-board graphics and audio 1 gb ram is more than enough to stream most content, unless you want full HD...

I have a media server with 4Tb storage raided so 1 TB for movies and 1 TB for audio / images and docs.

In total we have 3 laptops / 7 desktops and the server. that's 11 computers

I do have a music PC in the recording studio but have set that up in a DMZ, don't want any unfortunate mishaps with my valuable work


Anyway, good to hear I am not alone in the number of processors in the house
)

Korg.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 09:10 AM
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reply to post by Ahmose
 


I am still amazed by how many people I talk to
(that still use windoze-*only a few*) lol
who have no idea what the remote desktop/ remote access feature is, or that it is turned on by default in windoze.


I too am amazed. I repair computers for a small shop, and every MS box that comes in has this feature on by default. I think it is supposed to be for "remote assistance," but anyone who calls will be talking to someone in Bombay India, and you, the user has to give them permission to access your machine. Then anything can happen. People are still afraid of Linux, I run Fedora myself, and show it to everyone. all are impressed at the speed and performance, much better than their Vista or XP machine. Windows 7 isn't much better, the default firewall is less than adequate, and any good firewall for Windows has to be purchased. Another thin Windows does is save, by default, everything. Look in your TEMP file if you doubt, and do a search for "Cookies." This can be disabled in Internet Options. Once you allow remote access to your computer, a port is left open, like an open door. Close the doors before the horse gets out. Research this out, how to secure your computer. Be safe, the www is not a safe place.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 09:41 AM
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I've an idea...

To ensure security of your data... Write everything down on paper and take polaroid pictures and learn how to spell and use a calculator and get a local library card, and walk to blockbusters, and invest in a record player, and make sure you have a phone book handy then dump all your computers..

It could be the 1980's all over again for you...

At least you won't get hacked!!



Korg.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


What about ATS?

I do not want to live without ATS.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 10:10 AM
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I had a web surfer stalk my PC for 3 months and he got in over much defense.

He was finally able to slip a RAT file onto a storage drive and caused much havoc as well as hacking a user name.

The big antivirus programs couldn't find it.

I tried many trial and freeware programs and they couldn't find it.

I couldn't find it.

Finally, I got an antivirus program that found it.

I purchased their antivirus and firewall

Yes I was and am running MS OS's, now with no problems

the url to find more info is agnitum and the program is called outpost.

The RAT file was found on a storage only drive and inserted into an .exe file of all places.

Very cunning exploit over an online game. I couldn't believe the effort taken to "get me" for banning this guy from an online game.

But, Outpost did what all the others couldn't.



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