It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

WikiLeaks Posts Mysterious 'Insurance' File

page: 37
150
<< 34  35  36    38  39  40 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 7 2010 @ 01:26 PM
link   
reply to post by Snarf
 

Regardless, my comment wasn't far off...The Pentagon has released official statements to the contrary and it is starting to seem that Wiki is going to release the key...

There have to be communications that we aren't seeing...




posted on Aug, 7 2010 @ 01:29 PM
link   
This is fking priceless.




posted on Aug, 7 2010 @ 02:01 PM
link   

Originally posted by Illusionsaregrander

Well I am surprised that YOU are surprised that the MSM is not practicing good journalism.

Besides, did it ever occur to you that they did not need to "question the validity of the documents?" Why would you not assume that the NYT was in contact with the government from the moment they were informed they would be receiving the data?

You didnt address the net benefit question. How do you see your scenario benefiting them? If this is the CIA funding Wikileaks, and setting us all up, how does making the CIA look bad, and the war in Afghanistan look irresponsible and ineffective, and more costly in human terms than we have been led to believe work in favor of the CIA?

How does gathering info in such a public manner that all your targets KNOW they are being exposed benefit an intelligence agency?

I suppose it could be argued that this could be the false flag that lets them shut down the internet, or lock it down tighter, but did they really need to make us all cognizant of the fact that they are scheming lying manipulating weasels to do so? It seems to me it would have been far more effective for them to uncover some "horrible plot" against innocents here at home, perpetrated by anyone other than themselves. Now if they shut down the net, a fair percentage of us are going to suspect that they did some really horrible things they dont want us to ever know about. No one is going to buy the terrorist line of crap at this point. Or very few will.

I guess I dont follow your logic in regard to why the PTB would send up a false flag that makes them look evil, manipulative, and arrogant as well as mildly incompetent all rolled into one. One or the other, ok, I could run with a story line, but both, its just hard to see how you feel that benefits them in any way. Either here or abroad.



Just a thought - The "insurance" file turns out to be a system-disabling virus of some sorts, transmitting through networks, stealing information, deleting information, basically really ******* **** up.

Our savior government comes in, says "See, you can't trust this man. We will now monitor the internweb better for you so you won't be tricked by these scams. Remember those leaks about the war? You now know you were all tricked by a cyber terrorist and we forgive you for asking questions. You now see that we were doing everything in your best interest. Please go back to sleep, don't bother us while we continue to have what we now call 'Liberating Freedom Fights' in foreign countries. Go back to Fox News and CNN, and any government-recommended news site. Have a great day!"


Just a thought.



posted on Aug, 7 2010 @ 02:32 PM
link   

Originally posted by tokyodynamite
If WL replied to freedomusic's email, "you almost got it!", then we should take into account that what they said could be sarcasm or they are actually telling him that he almost cracked it which means that they're probably waiting for the file to be cracked. Out of all the intelligient individuals in this world, there must be one person that can take into account the "Assange" mentality and find out the password.

It's just a matter of time.



I'm sorry, but what makes yall think the intern answering the emails knows the legendary "insurance" password?



posted on Aug, 7 2010 @ 02:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by Snarf

Originally posted by MemoryShock
Chess begins...second line.


LOL!

I don't think wikileaks is an insider, i honestly think he's just a propagandist who manipulates information to further his agenda.

He's already admitted, publicly, to doing so.

He's no hero. He's no villian. He's just another greasy stain on the facade of journalistic integrity.


Ok, Mr. "Intellectual"~
Are you that simple as to think that wikileaks is only one guy, Assange?

You serious?
Most of what happens with wikileaks is done by others, not even assange!


You talk about wikileaks as if it is one man! haha,
c'mon,
I know lots of ppl dont like to pay attention,
But someone who throws words around like you are doing,
should at least know what their talking about. lol

Enjoy your corrupt government.

You dont seem to have much of an issue with them lying to you? lol

Whatever, Peace, n,,,
sweet dreams..




posted on Aug, 7 2010 @ 04:35 PM
link   
reply to post by MemoryShock
 


i haven't gotten through all the pages yet of this, so someone may have said this already, but at the end of that page sited about the experiment, he says it is the effects of static that makes the straw move and not TK, hence could it be inferred that the name means something along the lines of "everyone thinks its one thing, but its actually something else"

which makes it into a cute joke about the government pulling a 3 cup trick on us, so kinda useless but just what i thought when i saw the page. and also i may certainly be horribly wrong, my two cents.



posted on Aug, 7 2010 @ 06:15 PM
link   
[edit on 7-8-2010 by mikeATSuser]



posted on Aug, 7 2010 @ 09:19 PM
link   
America are the "bad guys", I feel sick knowing that the country I live in supports the USA as allies. I would love to see all the data stored at the Pine Gap facility.

Obama is proof that your Presidents are just puppets to corporate greed.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 01:57 AM
link   
Basic four char brute turned up nothing, but here are intermediate results for someone who knows what he's looking at in case I missed something:
livzi.net...
Five chars underway.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 02:10 AM
link   
reply to post by the.krio
 


I dont know what I'm talking about, but I'm sure the key is more likely to have 256 chars



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 03:06 AM
link   
reply to post by ghostsoldier
 


No, I'd estimate that there's about 20% chance that they've used a good key and not a pass phrase which would be possible to bruteforce.
Anyway, once 5 chars is done with, a basic dictionary attack on 6 and more chars will proceed, then I'll be expanding the chars, combinations and modes of operation used.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 06:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by the.krio
No, I'd estimate that there's about 20% chance that they've used a good key and not a pass phrase which would be possible to bruteforce.

Sorry, I don't understand the difference between a key and a pass-phrase, could you please explain it?

Thanks in advance.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 07:30 AM
link   

Originally posted by the.krio
reply to post by ghostsoldier
 


No, I'd estimate that there's about 20% chance that they've used a good key and not a pass phrase which would be possible to bruteforce.
Anyway, once 5 chars is done with, a basic dictionary attack on 6 and more chars will proceed, then I'll be expanding the chars, combinations and modes of operation used.


If i wanted security then i would have used AES CBC mode with random IV: the thing is, there are known attacks for AES, 4 related keys attacks for AES192 and AES256, breaking the full 12 rounds of the first and the full 14 of the latter; another type using 2 related keys can break 10 out of 14 rounds of AES256: these are theoretical attacks but 192/256 bit AES have been broken in theory. paper1, paper2
There are no known attacks for AES128 faster than 2^128 complexity, and this is precisely due to key collisions: i wouldn't discard the hypothesis of choosing a 256bit key with AES128, attacks against AES192 are more efficient against AES256 due to the weaknesses in the key schedule algorithm and WL would know this for sure.

I think it all depends if they ever wanted this thing decrypted "by the people" or not.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 07:46 AM
link   

Originally posted by ArMaP
Sorry, I don't understand the difference between a key and a pass-phrase, could you please explain it?
Thanks in advance.


A passphrase is a password or a key you can remember: it's far more easy to remember "i want this file to be protected from government eyes" than"rmIGPbrU018pI49h00aO8rnsc" or longer keys: using passphrases and deriving keys from that correctly is another matter btw, and achieving the correct entropy is difficult with them too.
This is why there are salting, stretching and other techniques to add more entropy to it.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 07:52 AM
link   
reply to post by dudez
 


Thanks for the explanation.


I usually use passphrases, but I include Portuguese accented characters, from what I have seen those are usually left out of normal bruteforce attempts, and look as meaningless as a key for those that do not know the language.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 08:01 AM
link   

Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by dudez
I usually use passphrases, but I include Portuguese accented characters, from what I have seen those are usually left out of normal bruteforce attempts, and look as meaningless as a key for those that do not know the language.


This is good against bruteforce attacks, but, unfortunately, it doesn't add any more security against related-keys attacks.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 08:04 AM
link   

Originally posted by the.krio
Basic four char brute turned up nothing, but here are intermediate results for someone who knows what he's looking at in case I missed something:
livzi.net...
Five chars underway.


I noticed the file unix utility isn't much reliable since it get confused early and generates a lot of false positives: i have seen lot of "MSDOS/COM executables", "DB3" results on mine own and i see you have the same.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 10:59 AM
link   
Wikileaks to hold news conference tomorrow at 10am GMT in London.

Could be quite interesting, surely they will ask him about the insurance file?

Edit - changed 9am in error to 10am.

[edit on 8-8-2010 by qualitygossip]



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 11:41 AM
link   
Intro to Cryptography~
www.hackthissite.org...

Intro to OpenPGP~
www.hackthissite.org...

4-5 characters?
Why on earth anyone would even think it would be 4 characters is beyond me..
That is a pure waste of time.

GhostSoldier is right,
It is (more than) likely, hundreds of characters. lol

It wont be a "passphrase", it will be a loooong 'key',
that no one could remember in their head or 'brute'.
Not even rainman. lol

This may be of interest to some of you,
or at least give you a better idea of what your "up against". lol

tech.groups.yahoo.com...


If you can't manage to 'read' any of those posts,
You will have no luck at all with the insurance file.
:p





[edit on 8-8-2010 by Ahmose]



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 11:53 AM
link   
we need to make sure at least a few hundred ATS members have this file downloaded in case Assange does release the password.

He is being threatened by US Gov and is saying he may release it



new topics

top topics



 
150
<< 34  35  36    38  39  40 >>

log in

join