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My belief about this stone.

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posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 08:44 AM
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reply to post by Harte
 


thats the word, a scrimshaw. He said it seemed like it had reallly small writing on it, which is why he thought that. This things plays tricks on your eyes and mind the more you look at it closely.




posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 08:58 AM
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reply to post by Myendica
 


I also wondered if it might be a piece of scrimshaw.

Here is a wiki article describing it.

en.wikipedia.org...


Scrimshaw is derived from the practice of sailors on whaling ships creating common tools, where the byproducts of whales were readily available. The term originally referred to the making of these tools, only later referring to works of art created by whalers in their spare time. Whale bone was ideally suited for the task, as it is easy to work and was plentiful.



It might explain why your object has an oval rather than a round shape.

Another article explains how sometimes deer antler was used for scrimshaw inbetween whale cullings. I still think it reminds me of deer antler!

www.ehow.com...


. Use of shed deer antler for scrimshaw has lead to a revival of this American art form.



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 09:20 AM
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Can you determine the specific gravity of the object. That is a good means of determining its general composition. Metal, stone, and bone would all have very different specific gravities. Since the object had been immersed in water for a long time and now is dry be certain that there is no cracking of the object before placing it back in water.



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 09:33 AM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


How would I test its gravity? I'm almost positive its not metal. I understand not all metal is magnetic, but this isn't magnetic, and it feels too pourous to be metal. It feels lighter than metal would be.

But I will test gravity if I knew how.

Its not very dense.



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 09:35 AM
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I really wish there was a way that you who are interested in it could be able to feel it and touch it and see it. The pictures do very little i feel.



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 09:37 AM
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reply to post by Blanca Rose
 


The idea of a scrimshaw did seem good. Which if it were I would feel its even older than I thought. I really don't think its has been worn down so much by water. I feel only a small bit of it has been eroded.

I really wish I could see the history of this stone from a 3rd person point of view, be so easy to understand then.



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 09:41 AM
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Why does it appear to be approx 4 x the size of your thumb nail
in the side veiw and not even half that in another veiw?



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 09:44 AM
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reply to post by lestweforget
 


Perception I suppose. I gave most of the dimensions on page 1 I think.

It is half the size of my pinkies length and about the width of my index finger.



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 11:05 AM
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reply to post by Myendica
 


The specific gravity is like density. Basically, a density measurement can help you exclude some things. We know this sinks so its density is greater than 1 g/ml.

I was just suggesting a nondestructive test that might give some idea of what makes us the material.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 12:24 AM
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Originally posted by Myendica
Heres a Sketch of what I see, or atleast have once seen. It is hard looking at this stone. The colors play tricks and what you see slightly changes with light and angle.


Could this possibly be made of a fired clay, or pottery?

It's hard to tell from the pictures (wish I could see it in person,
)
but to me, it looked like it could be made from clay.

Recently I was reading about ancient seals that have been found in the past, and I was wondering if this could be a seal...... worn down or not inscribed very deeply. I can't really see anything on it from the pictures, as far as an inscription, but looking at the picture you drew, it looks like a horse, and an ANCHOR to me.

So, googling * seals with horse anchor *, I found some information that does suggest it could be a seal from the Seleucid (modern day Iraq/Iran area) era about 200 something B.C.E. The anchor and the horse are both symbols attributed to the first two Seleucid kings, if I remember correctly. Perhaps an agent of one of the kings was carrying this as some type of identification?

Here is a pdf article I found on the subject. On page 2 of the article, there is a sample of a clay tablet stamped with some seals.

On the left side of the clay tablet there is an impression made from a seal which is the same shape as your object, and no real impression of a design within the shape, like your object.

After doing some research on this subject, I found that the seals can be made of different materials. Some of the stated materials would be various types of stone material, such as slate, different types of gemstone materials, bone, fired clay, clay pottery, and others.

Maybe you could have someone with some expertise in antiquities take a look at your item to see if they can figure out what it might be.

What would this item be doing in the Caribbean, if it is indeed some sort of seal from the Seleucid era?

I have read that ancient seafarers traveled all over the world.

I hope you find out what the item is.

Thank you for sharing it.

God bless,
sezsue




[edit on 1-8-2010 by sezsue]



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by sezsue
 


You know, thats a very interesting idea. I too just saw a few documentaries talking about clay seals, and that would explain why one side completely flat, and the other, someone rounded...?

I am not sure.. I still don't get the lip on the top around the edge.

I appreciate your input, as well as everyone elses.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 09:24 PM
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Nice find !

Have you tried to print it in a wet sand box ? can help to see the writings.
dont hesitate to post more zoomed in pics i m curious. :p



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by Fedge
 


Well if you all continue to be interested, I will continue to provide any information. I'm going to get my hands on a professional camera sometime this week, and when I do, I'm definately taking more close-ups of it. I appreciate your sand box idea. I will give it a shot. My work has very small granular items, such as cornstarch, which is very fine powder, so perhaps I could try that as well.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 09:51 PM
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Thats a really cool find.

Have you tried looking at it under a really bright light?
I have some one kilowatt photography lamps and you would be amazed at the extra detail that you can see when you use them, or maybe you could try pressing it into some modeling clay or plasticine to see extra details.

As a side note, I had kind of a similar experience to this.
Once when I was snorkeling in Greece, I found a little velvet bag about 15 feet down, on returning to the shore I opened it up and found a golden crucifix inside, needless to say I was really excited, that was until the Greek guy that I was swimming with pointed out that the cross was actually made of gold colored plastic and you could buy the exact same thing at the tourist shop near the beach
I was pretty embarrassed



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


Its funny you mention that, because I had that fear, especially since, before I found this under the ocean, I had found something else of similar shape, much larger, but was actually a rubber key holder for the Atlantis resort.

So needless to say, when I found this, I was so excited because I knew it wasn't anything made anytime recently. Though I'm not an expert, and couldn't say 100% for sure its older than 25 years, but I believe its old, 100's.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 10:19 PM
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I think the only way you are going to find out anything for sure is to ask someone with knowledge of geology. If going to a museum seems intimidating then how about an Internet geologist forum (just google one) they would probably have a better idea of what it is.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 10:36 PM
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Originally posted by davespanners
Thats a really cool find.

Have you tried looking at it under a really bright light?
I have some one kilowatt photography lamps and you would be amazed at the extra detail that you can see when you use them, or maybe you could try pressing it into some modeling clay or plasticine to see extra details.

As a side note, I had kind of a similar experience to this.
Once when I was snorkeling in Greece, I found a little velvet bag about 15 feet down, on returning to the shore I opened it up and found a golden crucifix inside, needless to say I was really excited, that was until the Greek guy that I was swimming with pointed out that the cross was actually made of gold colored plastic and you could buy the exact same thing at the tourist shop near the beach
I was pretty embarrassed


Good point about using light! Also, take several snaps because the camera will reveal things impossible to detect by eye. You don't need a pro camera. I have a canon point and shoot which outperforms higher models if you get the shot angle right, with less set up time. Once, while looking at images I'd snapped, I spotted a set of penciled initials on a black background~impossible to detect had it not been for the pictures. The initials are virtually invisible until you know where they are. They made the piece very valuable because the initials were from a famed artist.

Did you ever look around for the little jewel?



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by davidmann
 


Nah the jewel is long gone. There was no hope of finding.

I will see what I can do about lighting. But I have a friend with a high res micro lens, so we're going to try it out.

[edit on 1-8-2010 by Myendica]



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 10:59 PM
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Try taking photos from as many angles as possible, and in different light sources, i.e. natural day light, with and without flash, under florescent lights etc etc and you could also try shining different colors of light onto it (maybe even UV light if you have one).

I know from doing product shots for catalogs that an object that looks completely flat and shiny from one direction can look dirty and scratched to death by moving it just a few degrees in either direction.

Hope you come up with something exciting



posted on Aug, 13 2010 @ 01:58 AM
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Looking at the sketch of the marking, there's definitely an anchor and a skull on there. So that may have something to do with pirates. (But I couldn't find any jolly roger or ship's emblem designs that matched.) The pieces of eight idea doesn't seem that far-fetched. The other thing by the skull looks like a powder horn or marlin-spike, but the pic is too small/fuzzy to make out detail. I can't make out all of the text, but there's definitely the letter "M" on there. The other letter I can make out looks like a "U" or a "Y". There seems to be other letters, but I can't make them out.

Using my meager google skills, I found there was a pirate/privateer by the name Sir Christopher Myngs. That would cover a name starting with M and Y (if it is indeed a "Y"). Whether or not that's relevant, who knows? You might actually have some form of historical artifact. I'd try to find some maritime/historical museum and see what they think of it. You should also make note of the location where it was found, who knows there might be a chance to find some other loot there.





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