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Space Age Dentistry

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posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 07:16 AM
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In a book entitled The Key to Ultimate Health by Ellen Hodgson Brown and Richard T. Hansen, a new approach to dentistry is presented. The book came out in 2000.

Ellen Brown is an attorney who writes books about the things she learns about through her cases. She also wrote the book Web of Debt concerning our monetary system. The book says Richard Hansen was one of five dentists conducting the research required for FDA approval of the dental use of lasers for removing cavities, which was granted in the summer of 1997.

In the Preface to the book, Ellen Brown shares her experience having her silver/mercury amalgam fillings removed after reading of their health hazards and having them replaced with composite (plastic) materials and the fact that she stopped having chronic fatigue after that. Then, she was advised to have the composites replaced because they were shutting down energy fields running through her teeth. The recommended replacement is biocompatible materials - something like the natural tooth.

The book describes vaporizing cavities with pinpoint precision with a laser instead of drilling, and then injecting glass-filled, biocompatible tooth replacement material, and fusing it with an argon laser light. The book says repair materials need to be laminated, not glued (cemented).

For root canals, the book talks about sterilizing the root with a laser and then using for the filling a product called Biocalex, which it says expands and seals tubules in the tooth, and provides long-term serilization.

The book also talks about the importance of the health of the mouth in relation to diseases in the body - that the cause can be in the mouth and transported to the body through the bloodstream. It also says there is something called the "battery effect" from metal fillings in conjunction with saliva that causes blockage of energy meridians in the body.

Hansen's website says he uses 14 different lasers in his practice and warns against practitioners who don't have thorough training in how to use them properly.




posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 07:49 AM
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Very interesting! I will have to look into those filling options, as I am set to have a crown installed within the next 6 months.

I was actually thinking about modern dentistry the other day and how it has changed very little over the past 30 years. I figured by the year 2010 we would be able to grow new teeth. But alas, we are still using archaic drills to create holes which they then dump some product into, resulting in a temporary fix that will eventually require a reinstall or crown.

I did read an article a while back about a new gel that actually allows your teeth to grow back within a month or so. But it may be 3-7 years before we see it. I think most likely the product/technology/patent will be purchased by some "interest" and it will never see the light of day.

The same for the medical field, where there have been hardware/technological innovations yet we still lack basic treatments and cures that are affordable. I figured by the year 2010 we'd have cured cancer and AIDS, and Diabetes and most diseases. But pharmaceuticals have only developed treatments that require sufferers to pay a monthly fee in order to live a decently healthful life. AIDS is a good example, as we have essentially cured it, as most who are infected can live normal lives, IF they take the cocktail of drugs regularly, and are able to pay the high fees.

Something tells me that Dentists have a good thing going, and they aren't going to allow anything that could "revolutionize" the treatment and maintenance of our teeth.



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 08:10 AM
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Just had some dental work done this week and the dentist used the latest glass filled composite type material for the repairs. First thing I noticed was that his light had changed colour, now it's an orange hue for low UV emission (UV accelerates the curing of the material). They still use the same intense spot UV lamp to set the filling once it's shaped in place. He told me this new composite is finally as hard or even harder than the old amalgam fillings, something that was severely lacking in the previous range of composites.

The technology has advanced a lot since the first composites hit the general practises back in the early 80s. Implant technology has also made some big leaps (if you can afford it that is) and they can now fix implants into your jaw bone and mount a full set of permanent false teeth on them - extreme but amazing.



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 08:13 AM
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The Preface of the book was written in December 1997, so I don't know whether this has changed or not, but I was struck by this passage:

In a survey published in Dentist magazine in 1989, more than a third of dentists said they believed all silver (mercury) alloy fillings should be removed and replaced with alternative materials. But, the dentists dared not make that recommendation to their patients, because the American Dental Association's Code of Professional Conduct currently provides that it is improper and unethical for a dentist to recommend the removal of mercury amalgam restorations except for cosmetic reasons.



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 08:45 AM
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There's been an ongoing kerfuffle over amalgam fillings for over 20 years without any absolute decision ever being made over the claims of toxicity. Most patients with these fillings from long ago have suffered zero health effects from them (me for example) and many claiming they're affected are seen to be blaming the fillings for unrelated health problems IE it's really still inconclusive as to whether there's a valid reason to get them replaced and until just now, there hasn't been a repair material of comparable or even superior durability to replace them with particularly in grinding teeth like molars etc. It's totally voluntary and if you ask your dentist to replace your amalgam fillings he'll do it (of course you'll be paying for it). As for me, I'm happy to keep the existing amalgam repairs I have.



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 09:32 AM
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reply to post by Pilgrum
 


I think the process of removing the mercury properly is also a concern.

I think people who do have health problems in other parts of the body simply need to be aware of the possibility that their dental work could be causing them and consider their options accordingly. Normally we wouldn't make a connection in that way.



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 12:23 PM
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Originally posted by Pilgrum
Just had some dental work done this week and the dentist used the latest glass filled composite type material for the repairs. First thing I noticed was that his light had changed colour, now it's an orange hue for low UV emission (UV accelerates the curing of the material). They still use the same intense spot UV lamp to set the filling once it's shaped in place. He told me this new composite is finally as hard or even harder than the old amalgam fillings, something that was severely lacking in the previous range of composites.


Do you remember what the new filling material is called?

I have a large filling in a tooth and the dentist wants to put a crown on it. I would rather just remove the filling and replace it, as I would like to keep my teeth as intact as possible. Would this new material help or is the concern more or less with the tooth itself weakening?



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 09:28 AM
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No idea what its actual name is but it's an improvement on the glass filled epoxy resin mainly in the way it cures faster and harder than previously. No filling lasts forever though and the best you can expect from these is around the 10 year mark while the old amalgam can last much longer than that up to the point where the tooth cracks or decays down the filling edge allowing it to fall out usually while eating something sticky like toffee.

If a tooth is bad enough for root canal & crown type repair the only other option is to extract it. Attempts to keep it as is with temporary fillings usually result in horrors like abscesses which leave you with a dead tooth needing to be removed anyway (been through all that myself more than once).

Now not to start another health conspiracy, but composite fillings worry me more than amalgam ones because I'm aware of the bad effect of epoxy resins and particularly the hardener in it (dermatitis, lesions and even tumors) on exposed skin yet we're getting it put in our teeth. I guess no-one lives forever.



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 10:33 AM
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Originally posted by Pilgrum
Just had some dental work done this week and the dentist used the latest glass filled composite type material for the repairs.


The book describes "composite" as plastic. Then it talks about "biocompatible materials." It goes on to say that there are now more than 100 different ceramic, glass-ceramic, and ceramic polymers.



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 10:56 AM
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Originally posted by Pilgrum
If a tooth is bad enough for root canal & crown type repair the only other option is to extract it. Attempts to keep it as is with temporary fillings usually result in horrors like abscesses which leave you with a dead tooth needing to be removed anyway (been through all that myself more than once).


I appreciate your response!

The tooth has a very large filling in it from about 10 or 15 years ago. There is slight decay around the filling and the dentist said that the only option is a crown and if I wait too long I could lose need a root canal or lose the tooth.

So I guess you are concurring, saying that it is not worth trying to remove/refill the filling? That you tried the same thing and failed and that I should get the crown?

Again, thanks for the reply!



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 11:15 AM
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Hi all,

I have submitted Biocalex on google and this was one of the results:


www.mgoldmandds.com...


*************************EXTRACT*********************************
What exactly is it ?????

************************

Note: I DO NOT like Biocalex and will never use it again, but the following is general information about it to help you understand what it is, why some dentists use it, and why I will not use it again with my patients.


Biocalex (recently marketed under the new name Endocal) is a system and set of materials used for root canal treatment. Many "holistic" or "alternative" dentists have long held the view that root canals are "bad" and should be avoided. They believe that teeth that have had root canal treatment should best be extracted.

Biocalex/Endocal is a root canal medication/filler that uses Calcium Oxide in ethyl glycol (ethyl glycol...sound familiar? as in antifreeze and toxic???). The calcium oxide combines with water in the tooth and becomes calcium hydroxide which is a well-known and long used and documented excellent root canal material. It then goes on to combine with Co2 and become essentially Plaster of Paris.

Their views stem mainly from the turn of the century (early 1900's) publications of Dr. Weston Price, in which he makes startling conclusions from his own research suggesting that infection from root canal teeth can and does cause serious infections in remote parts of the body. There is probably some merit to his claims, but in this author's opinion, his claims are incredibly overstated and, in fact, suspect! The fact that nobody else has been able to reproduce his findings further pushes me to that opinion. For much more detail about the work of Dr. Price and the controversies resulting from that work, please read my other articles in the Root Canal section listed on the Topics page. That should give you all the info you want...perhaps more!

Anyway... while holistic dentists seem to be almost unanimous about NO ROOT CANALS... they have sometimes become convinced that if the root canal is done using either a Laser or using Biocalex, that somehow it's ok. There's an article on Laser root canals on this site, too, if you want to know more about that.



As far as Biocalex goes, I have stated on this website that there are several problems with it and that I will no longer use it (I only used it on about 6 patients and that was enough for me...). Several years ago I believe there was more info on Biocalex on the internet but now there isn't much at all. Most of the research was written and published in French. I can't read French....Those problems include:

1.

Teeth being split by the Biocalex (while they deny that, of course, read the comments in THEIR literature).
2.

Pain and strange discomfort after using Biocalex (not denied)
3.

The Biocalex becomes invisible in the tooth making later diagnosis nearly impossible (not denied)
4.

Biocalex becomes very hard inside the canals, making re-treatment difficult or impossible if needed later (not denied)

Many of you have asked about documentation regarding the "problems I have talked about " with Biocalex / Endocal. So, I looked through the literature I have collected on hand and what I think is most instructive is to show you the info that was supplied to me from the manufacturer and distributor or Biocalex (now called Endocal, I believe).

******************
And follows.
For more information use the link above.



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 11:52 AM
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Originally posted by crustas
Biocalex/Endocal is a root canal medication/filler that uses Calcium Oxide in ethyl glycol (ethyl glycol...sound familiar? as in antifreeze and toxic???).


Is there a difference between "ethyl glycol" and "ethylene glycol"?

Here's a quote from the book:

Biocalex is composed of calcium oxide, zinc oxide, and a special ethylene glycol/water liquiid. Calcium oxide is unique in that it has an affinity for fluid: it absords liquids in the root canal and dentin tubules and expands, allowing the material to penetrate otherwise inaccessible canals. . . .


I don't see any more info about the way the "ethylene glycol/water liquid" works in a root canal.

People can go to Hansen's website for info. They can also fill out the customer service questionnaire on the website.



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 09:07 PM
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reply to post by DJM8507
 


I'm no dentist but my experience of the old style amalgam fillings is that they're necessarily quite large, leaving just a shell of the original tooth to hold them in place. If that shell cracks or decay weakens the hold on the filling you're left with extraction or crowning as the only options. These newer materials and drilling techniques make much smaller repairs possible leaving more of the original tooth which means you can have more shots (several decades) at repairing before reaching the crown or pull decision stage.



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 05:11 AM
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there's been experimental tooth regeneration for a while, unfortunately, it never seems to have taken off:


www.sciencedaily.com...



sing low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS), Dr. Tarak El-Bialy from the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry and Drs. Jie Chen and Ying Tsui from the Faculty of Engineering have created a miniaturized system-on-a-chip that offers a non-invasive and novel way to stimulate jaw growth and dental tissue healing.

"It's very exciting because we have shown the results and actually have something you can touch and feel that will impact the health of people in Canada and throughout the world," said Chen, who works out of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the National Institute for Nanotechnology.


that's imho the true 'space age' dentistry, curing the symptom will help, but for how long?



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 09:39 AM
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There's been an ongoing kerfuffle over amalgam fillings for over 20 years without any absolute decision ever being made over the claims of toxicity. Most patients with these fillings from long ago have suffered zero health effects from them (me for example) and many claiming they're affected are seen to be blaming the fillings for unrelated health problems IE it's really still inconclusive as to whether there's a valid reason to get them replaced and until just now, there hasn't been a repair material of comparable or even superior durability to replace them with particularly in grinding teeth like molars etc. It's totally voluntary and if you ask your dentist to replace your amalgam fillings he'll do it (of course you'll be paying for it). As for me, I'm happy to keep the existing amalgam repairs I have.

i agree with you



posted on Aug, 26 2010 @ 08:07 AM
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Originally posted by Mary Rose
For root canals, the book talks about sterilizing the root with a laser and then using for the filling a product called Biocalex, which it says expands and seals tubules in the tooth, and provides long-term serilization.


This is the part of the book that most interests me.

In another book, Lessons from the Miracle Doctors by Jon Barron, copyright 1999 and distributed by Healing America, Inc., Jon writes about the problem in traditional dentistry regarding root canals, in that the miles of microscopic tubules do not get fully sterilized.







 
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