It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Methane and the Bermuda Triangle

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 08:44 PM
link   
Hello again ATS,

I was talking with a friend yesterday and he brought up an interesting tid-bit I thought I would interject here about the Bermuda Triangles mystifying effects having something to do with methane bubbles being released from the bottom of the sea bed.

Basically, the Methane Bubble acts in a way as to drop out the water underneath the vessel, creating like a "pit" in the water. Once the ship has dropped into the "pit" the water rushes back in sub merging the ship.

Has anyone else heard of this. I find it interesting.

The magnetic anomalous condition I would imagine is due to the crust expansion along the trench from the rapid cooling of the new forming crust.

Here is some specs. on Methane from wiki...

Methane is a chemical compound with the chemical formula CH4. It is the simplest alkane, and the principal component of natural gas. Methane's bond angles are 109.5 degrees. Burning methane in the presence of oxygen produces carbon dioxide and water. The relative abundance of methane makes it an attractive fuel. However, because it is a gas at normal temperature and pressure, methane is difficult to transport from its source. In its natural gas form, it is generally transported in bulk by pipeline or LNG carriers; few countries transport it by truck.

Methane was discovered and isolated by Alessandro Volta between 1776 and 1778 when studying marsh gas from Lake Maggiore.



Methane is a relatively potent greenhouse gas. Compared with carbon dioxide, it has a high global warming potential of 72 (calculated over a period of 20 years) or 25 (for a time period of 100 years).[2] Methane in the atmosphere is eventually oxidized, producing carbon dioxide and water. As a result, methane in the atmosphere has a half life of seven years.

The abundance of methane in the Earth's atmosphere in 1998 was 1745 parts per billion (ppb), up from 700 ppb in 1750. By 2008, however, global methane levels, which had stayed mostly flat since 1998, had risen to 1,800 ppb[3]. By 2010, methane levels, at least in the arctic, were measured at 1850 ppb, a level scientists described as being higher than at any time in the previous 400,000 years.[4] (Historically, methane concentrations in the world's atmosphere have ranged between 300 and 400 ppb during glacial periods commonlly known as ice ages, and between 600 to 700 ppb during the warm interglacial periods).



In addition, there is a large, but unknown, amount of methane in methane clathrates in the ocean floors. The Earth's crust contains huge amounts of methane. Large amounts of methane are produced anaerobically by methanogenesis. Other sources include mud volcanoes, which are connected with deep geological faults, landfill and livestock (primarily ruminants) from enteric fermentation.


Something interesting to note about CH4 (Methane) is that it's build...



It's a tetrahedral shape...a triangle.

Anyway just curious to hear if anyone else has heard this?

Peace

[edit on 27-7-2010 by letthereaderunderstand]

[edit on 27-7-2010 by letthereaderunderstand]

[edit on 27-7-2010 by letthereaderunderstand]




posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 08:55 PM
link   
reply to post by letthereaderunderstand
 


I heard this some time back. Apparently there is a great deal of the gas jsut off the continental shelf, and it is subject to releases that can 'sink' a ship, and cause an aircraft to fall out of the sky...hence a potential casual factor behind the Bermuda Triangle. S&F for bringing forth an interesting thread.



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 07:59 PM
link   

Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck
reply to post by letthereaderunderstand
 


I heard this some time back. Apparently there is a great deal of the gas jsut off the continental shelf, and it is subject to releases that can 'sink' a ship, and cause an aircraft to fall out of the sky...hence a potential casual factor behind the Bermuda Triangle. S&F for bringing forth an interesting thread.



Hey Johnny good to see you,

Thanks for your response. I think this is one of the weirdest things I've ever heard of but, when my friend mentioned it, it made complete sense.

I didn't even think about the planes but, yeah if the methane released from the water dense enough why wouldn't it do the same thing to planes...good point.

Peace



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 08:25 PM
link   
it makes a lot more sense than many of the theories given to explain the 'bermuda triangle'



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 08:32 PM
link   
I saw this mentioned on one of the numerous Discovery or History channel shows.
They speculated about whether a large burst of methane from the ocean could take down airplanes too. Something about the methane being lighter than the surrounding air and making pilots lose control...
It was last year when I saw the show, so sorry about being foggy about it.



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 03:53 PM
link   

Originally posted by justadood
it makes a lot more sense than many of the theories given to explain the 'bermuda triangle'


It really does explain a lot. I would imagine that the effect would be much like a plane being on a jet stream and then having the stream just end.

This is what I find pretty funny having just pieced this together right now. What did they always explain away UFO's with? Anyone, anyone?

"SWAMP GAS".....Methane.....

This makes me wonder about the Aurora Borealis. Methane burns with a green blue hue. Maybe methane plays a more important role then we know?

Thanks for your post...

Peace



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 04:04 PM
link   

Originally posted by Chamberf=6
I saw this mentioned on one of the numerous Discovery or History channel shows.
They speculated about whether a large burst of methane from the ocean could take down airplanes too. Something about the methane being lighter than the surrounding air and making pilots lose control...
It was last year when I saw the show, so sorry about being foggy about it.


Hello Chamberf=6...good to see you again.

Exactly. It would be as if the flow dynamics were altered by the viscosity of the surrounding gas. The less dense the gas, the faster you must go to retain flight through it, unless traveling in a sphere of course.

Peace



posted on Aug, 10 2010 @ 08:28 AM
link   
Here we go with an update that would seem to nail it down. Ultimately? Who'd a' thunk it? All those books...all that conjecture that likely got a bunch of us to ATS in the first place all comes down to a case of gas.

According to two research scientists the mystery of vanished ships and airplanes in the region dubbed "The Bermuda Triangle" has been solved. Step aside outer space aliens, time anomalies, submerged giant Atlantean pyramids and bizarre meteorological phenomena ... the "Triangle" simply suffers from an acute case of gas. salem-news.com...



new topics

top topics



 
1

log in

join