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What comes after the Large Hadron Collider

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posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 03:01 AM
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What comes after the Large Hadron Collider


www.newscientist.com

So when will the next collider be chosen? No decision can be made until the LHC makes discoveries beyond the standard model of particle physics, such as evidence of "supersymmetric" particles. This will indicate which machine would be the most appropriate to further explore the properties of the new particles.

"Wishfully thinking, this could be by 2012, but more realistically by 2015 or so," said Rolf-Dieter Heuer, director general of the CERN particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, during a press briefing at the conference today. He reckons that it will then take a furthe
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 03:01 AM
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Ever wonder how or where the PTB decide to build powerful particle accelerators? Yea, I do too!


Two accelerator proposals are on the table to succeed the LHC: the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The ILC would smash electrons and positrons together in a 35-kilometre-long straight accelerator, whereas the CLIC would collide them in a shorter machine but accelerate them to higher energies. (See a summary of the pros and cons of each post-LHC collider here).


So Paris is the place summer 2010, plan to attend:


In summary, there can be no doubt that Paris is the place to be in summer 2010 for anyone interested in High Energy Physics.


And help decide which linear accelerator would be best!





www.newscientist.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Oct, 6 2010 @ 01:33 AM
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reply to post by plumranch
 


Who funds these massive colliders? What incredible sources of capital are available to governments that they can invest in a project to discover particles at the subatomic level. What benefit do they expect??



posted on Oct, 6 2010 @ 06:47 AM
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reply to post by plumranch
 


Why bother studying Quantum Mechanics? What benefits are there?

Also they should build a large hard-on collider after this.



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