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Japan panel moots major defence policy shift: reports

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posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 07:11 PM
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Originally posted by silent thunder
The entire Japanese government, in fact, is very decentralized. Prime Ministers come and go very quickly, sometimes several in the space of one year (ex-PM Koizumi was a recent exception, holding power for a number of years). There is very little central accountablilty the way there is in America or other European nations. Again, this was done by America after 1945, when it imposed the current form of government with the express aim of preventing too much power from falling into too few hands.


There is accountability. Kind of. Insofar as any government is accountable in practice.

What the government lacks is the ability - in many cases entrenched in law - to make the changes to legislation allowing them to write new legislation.

Case in point: the textbook story that the press picks up on every year or so.

What happens in a nutshell: A fringe ultra-right wing group prints a screed about WW2 and gets it approved as a textbook. Internet explodes, South Korea recalls ambassador, et cetrea.

The background: From about 1890, the government had complete control over education in Japan - and this filtered down into propaganda laced textbooks during the war. To prevent that from happening again, during the occupation, the USA changed the law - stipulating that the government could not dictate what was being taught in schools - and furthermore, the government could not have the power to change the law.

Fast forward to today, and the situation is this: the government cannot deny approval of a textbook on the basis of editorial commentary. Doing so would be illegal. Writing a law to make it legal would also be illegal.

Interestingly, if Japan were to change the law - to satisfy the anti-Japanese protesters in South Korea, it would be taking a large step back to the type of government it had in the past - which I assume no one wants to see again. Catch 22.

There is quite a lot of this in Japanese law surrounding censorship (in all forms), government control of various resources, and the military.




posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


not so much, actually i feel happier knowing there's another western counter-part in the region with strength and a sizable military.

Now, Japan don’t have the hard-core '' for the ruler '' mentality they did in the 30's / 40's .. . so this doesn’t bother me.

I feel much more comfortable with Japan having nukes, than Israel having nukes.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


not so much, actually i feel happier knowing there's another western counter-part in the region with strength and a sizable military.

Now, Japan don’t have the hard-core '' for the ruler '' mentality they did in the 30's / 40's .. . so this doesn’t bother me.

I feel much more comfortable with Japan having nukes, than Israel having nukes.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 08:21 PM
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Not much to post here-but i agree with yours 100% Agit8d.



Originally posted by Agit8dChop
reply to post by Vitchilo
 


not so much, actually i feel happier knowing there's another western counter-part in the region with strength and a sizable military.

Now, Japan don’t have the hard-core '' for the ruler '' mentality they did in the 30's / 40's .. . so this doesn’t bother me.

I feel much more comfortable with Japan having nukes, than Israel having nukes.



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