It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Contaminated water supply

page: 2
6
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:21 PM
link   
I think it has a direct connection to this thread:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

And perhaps what DG said is also part of it...




posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 07:36 PM
link   
Sounds like the brown water is caused by manganese and iron.

Its common is some areas and easily removed.

But if something goes wrong with the water treatment plant like something with the PH control days or weeks of manganese and iron that may be settled out in the water treatment plant may go back into the water system.

www.bae.ncsu.edu...



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 05:14 PM
link   
Check out this commentary by Holly Deyo:

Collecting Rainwater Now Illegal in Many States as Big Government Claims Ownership Over Our Water



standeyo.com...



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 07:07 PM
link   
reply to post by antar
 


It's a bit fishy that this was dated so recently. I remember hearing of this at least a year ago ..



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 07:27 PM
link   
Water utilities are required to have their test results released to the public. You can even contact the regional EPA office and request a copy of these results. Arkansas would be in region 6.

As for the high pH. It varies across the country, as you can see for these postings. In the Kansas City metro area, a pH of 9.5 to 10.5 is routine. There are technical reasons for this, but to bottom line this real quick. This is a hard water area regardless of water source. The cost of lowering the pH down to a lower level after the softening process is too expensive. Carbon dioxide gas is added to the water supply (forms carbolic acid) to lower the pH to an acceptable level. Phosphate is then added to the water as a sequestering agent to keep the excess calcium locked in a stable form so it just builds a small amount of scale instead of a large amount of scale.

If I was looking at the EPA's testing, after a high pH, I'd look at total phosphate and then orthophosphate concentrations. You'd want a fairly close relationship to keep organic phosphates to a minimum.

Chances are, you'll get sick at seeing all the other chemicals in the water supply at various levels.



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 07:35 PM
link   
Too much alkalinity will make a nice home for various bacteria and parasites that are usually kept away by the body's acidity. The ph level is one thing, and what else is in the water is completely different danger.




top topics
 
6
<< 1   >>

log in

join