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Important Survival foods

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posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by snowspirit
 


Good stuff, never even thought about whole wheat.

Ok wood stick, and do not use oleander, Check.
Garlic is the spice of the Gods!!
Thanks much for the input.




posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 11:44 AM
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George Washington's soldiers survived six months on just flour and water. In a survival situation, any food is good survival food.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by SUICIDEHK45
 


Good point, any shelter in a storm is better than none.
But I'm sure Washington's boys had something to supplement their diets maybe warm juicy bugs, frozen grass, pine nuts.
Just saying comfort food does alot for the morale of your soldiers.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 12:33 PM
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Originally posted by g146541

I need to get me some cookbooks, if for anything just for some variety.


This is a nice thread! I agree ~ comfort foods are a great survival tip.

You want a great collection of cookbooks? Hit your local estate sales. You'll find cookbooks going all the way back into the 1920s and 30s, many collected from the local utility companies, churches, etc. Small companies and organizations often put together cook books in the 50s and 60s from members' receipes and then sold them as fundraisers or gave them out as promos.

A really awesome cookbook to have on hand is the old "Joy of Cooking." Tells you everything, even including a section in the back on wild game.

[edit on 26-7-2010 by SeesFar]

[edit on 26-7-2010 by SeesFar]



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by SeesFar
 


Good tips on acquisitions.
And wow, Joy of cooking, I remember that cookbook.
However I was young and dumb when I had a chance to look at them, so I didn't.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:19 PM
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Apparently, a woman in Texas back during The Great Depression came up with a way to cook...

Eggless, Milkless, Butterless Cake


1 cup packed brown sugar
1 cup water
1/3 cup shortening
1 cup raisins
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 1/4 cups sifted cake flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup sliced almonds (optional)
1 teaspoon almond extract (optional)

Directions
1.Combine the sugar, water, shortening, raisins, spices, and salt in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, and stir while cooking for 3 minutes. Cool.
2.Measure flour, soda, and baking powder, and sift together.
3.Gradually stir dry ingredients into raisin mixture. Beat well. If an almond cake is desired, stir in almond extract and almonds. Pour batter into a greased 8 x 4 inch loaf pan.
4.Bake at 325 degrees F (165 degrees C) for about 1 hour.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by davidgrouchy
 


Good stuff, this will be a definate to try.
Dairy free cake
Thanks for the recipe.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 03:38 PM
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My daughter bought a cookbook at the used bookstore. Its an alaskan cookbook from the 70's, one of those they used to put together for charities, all the ladies send in their family recipes. I have to say it is one of the best and most interesting cookbooks I have ever laid my eyes on!!
It has all sorts, from Whale stew and reindeer burgers to Roast Moose Nose. There is also a recipe for "real icecream" which consists of rendered reindeer fat and fresh snow.mmmmmmm!!!

I agree that Garlic and Onion would be in my survival kit for planting, also green beans are very easy to grow, mature quickly, are delicious raw and pack a nutritious punch.
I think when we are hungry there isnt much we wont eat though!



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:10 PM
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When you have no choice:

Dental problems?
Infections, food poisoning, musket wounds, sword stabs, pustules...
going bald? hemroids?
(no help for those who have hemorrhoids on their shoulders I'm afraid, I prescribe a big stick applied repeatedly to the hemorrhoid till the applicator feels better)

Yarrow or king's foil, as it is also called as used by Aragorn in the LOTR when Frodo was stabbed by ring wraiths.

...breaks down the toxins and kills pain...

Place leaves and or flowers fresh or dry, on bump in gumsor infection
Make tea, (don't boil it ) in non metallic pot.
soak cotton ball
place on tooth /bump.
change as medicinal flavor dissipates.

for super evil abscess also soak a face cloth
and place it on the outside of the face so to get the infection from two exposures.
get it ON the abscess or infection one way or another.

for super extra life saving power add together:
yarrow- 6 parts
euchinacia -1 parts
elder bark- 1 parts
cloves- of couple parts, whatever
golden seal-1 part
licorice root- 1part

if you can dissolve the above in glycerin instead of tea its a thicker brew the tea above on cotton balls is the best you are going to get in a SHTF situation when you have no choice.

drink tea for food poisoning
stopps bloody chicken flue cold
though you may barf once to expell bad stuff redrink tea in that case.

some other helpers are:
(you might imbibe these too)
anti inflamitories...
tarragon
willow aspirin
meadow sweet aspirin


[edit on 26-7-2010 by Danbones]

[edit on 26-7-2010 by Danbones]

[edit on 26-7-2010 by Danbones]



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:27 PM
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when SHTF
food wise:
Peel the outer bark from pine tree branch tips and eat the soft inner bark.
Eat the catkins, the male flowers, right off the tree...
Pine trees are easy to catch and when wounded don't usually run far.

Doesn't taste too bad and lots of callories, and Vitamine C, so no scurvey.
Actually tastes pretty good IMHO.

For variety fry the thin inner bark strips on hot stones
and eat like patato chips.

cattails
well, they are super edible
at all times of the year there is something on them you can eat.

in winter:
build a fire in a swamp where the dead stems are.
when the ground is thawed dig up the rooty parts
eat
lots of starchy callories to keep you warm and mobile.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:46 PM
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FandS
sorry to be a thread hog

Bannock
flower like from the pollen spikes of the cattail
or whole wheat
or from the starch of the cattail root...

so combine flower and water nice and thick.
let sit for twenty minutes
coat a green stick
brown in fire till out side is slightly crunchy.

slide off the stick and fill with butter jam weiners meat you name it.

you will thank me even if it is just snack time

if you have a sweetener in the dough it helps
so does baking soda or magic baking powder.

here is a good resource

www.survivaltopics.com...



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by mutantgenius
 


Good mix of recipes in those community compilation books.
The ice cream sounds good but the moose nose,…. I will just have to plant more herbs to deal with, but yeah if hungry enough we have been known to boil shoe leather.
Thanks for the contribution.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by Danbones
 


Good idea with the bannock. My hubby and I went thru a rough patch for a while financially, as we got more money working out for us, we realized our bannock had turned into breads and cakes, depending on what we were adding. Works great when you're broke


It'll even turn into fritters if you add an apple



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 08:26 PM
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reply to post by Danbones
 


Herb wise I am a lost soul, there is still much I need to learn on identifying the ones that serve purpose other than some standard cooking types.
Now food wise you mention catching a pine tree, if I am in a large hunting party I might approach this idea as we know they have a hard time evading us, but they are huge and take multiple rounds to take down: lol:
And thread hog? Hogwash, no such thing. Info is knowledge and knowledge is…. Well tastier foods.

Good idea on the batter stick.
Thank you much!



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 09:25 PM
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I am /was a lucky boy
I am Metis which has a survival minded culture
it is what we do for fun.
Canoeing/tripping hunting fishing are the high points of childhood.
Throw in party supplies and a guitar and well,
it becomes an adult passion

I would go to a used book store and look, I have a really good library of referance books cheap, and the sooner you start the easier it is.

I would get a good plant identifier like the national audoban society, and some Peterson field guides, edibles and medicinals, and just identify the common ones around the yard first...you will be amazed at what you find...
the internet has some great sites for herbs
www.botanical.com...
awesome site
here is the recipe page
www.botanical.com...

I would also go for some Kevin Trudeau books on household cures too,
or anything that teaches some diagnostics and whats in the spice rack.
Old wives wisdom is a good thing too...if there any old gals still around spend some time. It will help you both I'm sure.

There are excellent pages on the net...just punch in Bannock recipe for instance....of course the open wood fire is the spice that makes it...
or anything cooked that way IMHO.

Just be carefull to get some fiber, flour and water is glue after all.
Bannock dough also makes a good fish batter too.
Purslain and dandelions are nice common greens
and sumac droop/ berries and purslain together taste amazing...
eat and walk...

I guess you can tell this is my passion even if things don't SHTF
this stuff provides good alternatives to the PTBs toxic fare.

PS hi SS
thats exactly why I recommend learning some of this stuff
and when you can make comfort food in emergencies the situations down grade to something much easier to deal with...
and I have been there in brokedown too...
and making Bannock passed the time and took my mind of my troubles and fed me which was a big help

bannock
I find the first extra is a sweetener of any kind, takes out the doughy taste.
with cinnamon and raisons
dough balls and gravy
fritters
fry bread
batter for elder flowers for instance, or tomatoes, or onions,
throw eggs or milk into the batter
throw in soup mix like onion or chicken
CHEESE



[edit on 26-7-2010 by Danbones]

[edit on 26-7-2010 by Danbones]

[edit on 26-7-2010 by Danbones]



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by Danbones
 


Good stuff, I am into most of those but... shockingly i have not gone fishing in probably 30 years, I never waas big on fishing.
I probably would be if I was more into fish though.
Awesome links page thanks.



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 04:20 AM
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Originally posted by mutantgenius

It has all sorts, from Whale stew and reindeer burgers to Roast Moose Nose. There is also a recipe for "real icecream" which consists of rendered reindeer fat and fresh snow.mmmmmmm!!!


Whale stew isn't all that good. Roast moose nose? Nope, jellied moose nose is traditional, and tastes great, if anyone wants me to post how to do it I will.

As for the ice cream, no one uses reindeer fat, there isn't enough, caribou fat is used, called agutuk. Blueberries, 2nd snow(not the first, too dry), and caribou fat. May sound terrible, but better than any ice cream you have ever tasted in your life.

As for survival Mac and cheese. Better be or know a farmer. Milk is everywhere if you think about it. Cows, goats, sheep, hell cats and rats. Need to know how to turn it into cheese ahead of time. Maybe intimidating at first, but cheese is rather easy to make with some patience.

As for the pasta. Ever made your own? I can churn out and cut a years supply with a $75 pasta machine in less than 4 hours. Tastes better, I know what's in it, and I avoid stores. Win, win, win. Need eggs however, so be or know a farmer.



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 04:33 AM
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reply to post by salchanra
 


Ehh, a couple of those recipes I may not try but either way it is nice to know what you can do with what you have.
I do know about fat in Ice cream though.
I had a buddy who worked at wendys hamburgers and he claimed they put a big old scoop of lard into their frosty shakes for extra constitution.
As for cheese I have none yet but in rounds in cheese wax they can go 30 years.
Pasta making is one of the cooking angles I have never explored personally.
But I imagine it would be days cheaper and a world better than the domestic pastas here.
You have planted an idea in my head therefore My wallet is angry, but I’m sure my tummy says you rock.
Thanks for the input.



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 05:54 AM
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Best book for forage foods and how to cook them;

Food for Free, Richard Mabey. Still in publication after 35yrs, this book gives info on how to cook/prepare non poisonous flora and fauna (indigenous or introduced) found in the British Isles.

Here are a couple of unusual fruit receipts;


Whitebeam Sorbus aria

A very striking shrub, flashed with silver when the wind turns up the pale underside of the leaves. The bunched red berries are edible as soon they begin to 'blet' - or go rotten, like medlars.


Make them into a concoction with new wine and honey.


Blackcurrant Ribes nigrum

The soothing properties of blackcurrant juice were probably known long before the plant passed into cultivation, for it was often given against sore throats and the 'quincy'. It is a rather uncommon plant in the wild and can readily be told from redcurrant by its larger, heavily aromatice leaves. A few of these, dried, can transform a pot of Indian tea.

The currants can also be dried and in this form they are one the bases of 'pemmican', and Amerindian dish taken up by Polar explorers. The currants are pounded together with dried meat and the mixture bound together and coated with fat or tallow. The result is a food containing almost all the ingredients necessary fro a balanced diet,which would keep well even on long journeys.


Using the, make a basic cheese roux and pre- boiled pasta method, I made macaroni cheese last week. It occured to me that, as a dried staple, could macaroni/pasta cook in the same way as rice pudding, ie what would be the result of placing uncooked pasta, cheese and milk in a dish and slow bake for an hour or two? Would the starch in the pasta combine with the melting cheese to thicken the milk? Haven't tried it!

[edit on 27/7/2010 by teapot]



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 07:10 AM
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biology.clc.uc.edu...
and
www.cheesemaking.com...
here is a good thread for making cheese...

vegetable rennet plants
www.nature.com...

The plant coltsfoot ash contains salt if a person is far from a source like the sea or salt flats.
note the vegetable rennets

darn, now I am going to have to try some of if this.



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