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Does the moon look extremly bright to anyone else?

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posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by Stewie
 


Stewie...what do you mean "some astronomers say" the Moon doesn't rotate???


NO astronomer worth his/her salt would say that!!!!

ONLY the crackpots, I suppose...the Moon rotates about its axis, there is NO DOUBT whatsoever amongst scientists and astronomers ( valid astronomers, at least...
)

Anyone who says it doesn't rotate, or there are "degrees of discussion" on it are flat out wrong!

Sorry, but that sort of disinfo (even the slgihtest hint of it) should never go unchallenged, on the ATS forums. Deny ignorance.


Because pictures convey info much better than ten thousand words can, here:




Keep in mind that is a simplistic representation....the Moon actually orbits in an ellipse (as do all planets also, about the Sun).




posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:17 PM
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I noticed the moon very bright also specially last night, I have some nice binoculars that I use to see the space shuttle take off's from my house and I have looked at the moon before with them, but last night it hurt my eyes, it was just to bright to see it with the binoculars. I have also noticed a strong HEAT during the day, yesterday during the day the temperature peaked to 113F on my weather station, and on my car temp gauge around 119F HOT AS HELL.

I really dont know where the NOAA weather stations are located here in my area but hey suck, because they just max 98F, I'm guessing they have it on a nice shaded place.

Maybe the sun is getting closer to earth and making the moon brighter
and hight temps during the day.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 

I took you off of ignore to see how you misrepresented my statements THIS time.
Back to ignore.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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Originally posted by Stewie
reply to post by Erasurehead
 

Oh yeah?

www.grantchronicles.com...

Like I said, most astronomers agree with you, but it gets a bit technical on what "rotate" actually means. For instance, If I have the face of the moon (that we see) attached by a rope to say a vehicle on the Earth that is circling the globe at the same speed the moon is, the moon would be behaving essentially as it does now. From other points in space, the moon would appear to be rotating, but it would not HAVE to be rotating to give the illusion.

Interesting, anyway.



Think about it. If the moon did not rotate on its axis the people that live on the other side of the earth would see the far side of the moon facing earth.
You can do a very simple experiment to prove it.

Put a chair in the middle of the room, stand a few feet away from the chair facing it. Now walk (orbit) around the chair to the opposite side without rotating your body. Your back will now be facing the chair.

No real astronomer thinks that the moon doesn't rotate on its axis.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by Erasurehead
 

The moon could be locked by gravity. It does not HAVE to be rotating.
Christ.

Maybe, this time, read my link.

www.grantchronicles.com...



[edit on 26-7-2010 by Stewie]



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by SwissPort905v2
 


No.

I live in England, the time is 22:45.

The moon is full but it looks no brighter than on anyother full moon, sorry.

Maybe i'm in the wrong part of the world.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


Thanks. Yes it was beautiful but I thought nothing of it because I have seen the moon that bright and will continue on occasion to see it that bright.

There was nothing strange or nefarious about it. There's people here saying "its never been that bright" or "why was it that bright worldwide".

Well id like evidence of both of those claims. I doubt a single person can remember every full moon theyve ever seen and I doubt it looked the same all over the world and I doubt there are records of the moons reflective factor kept on a daily basis. Again with the fantasy worlds.

Also this full moon happened to fall on a Saturday night which happens to coincide with people staying up late, which happens to coincide with tons of people suddenly realizing that full moons are bright. Most of the people who saw it are probably in bed before during full moons on a weeknight and so would not otherwise see a full moon. Not to mention some of them were possibly intoxicated and so their pupils were dialated causing a false perception of the brightness of everything.

That's my dollar-fifty.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by Stewie
 


I'm with you on this one. I do not believe the moon rotates on its OWN vertical axis. However it does revolve around the earth and rotates around the earth's vertical axis. I saw the video and its interesting, and understand the simple experiment mentioned above, but I have one of my own, to prove the moon does not rotate on its own vertical axis. It involves getting out some of your old stuff from your childhood and young adult days.

Gather an 'old fashioned' turntable; an old vinyl record you don't care about; an old fashioned plastic toy soldier on its own standup base; and some glue.

Now put the record on the turntable.

Next, glue the toy soldier onto the outer edge of the record (which is why I say take one you don't care about) facing the center post of the turntable poking through the record. Wait for the glue to dry.

Finally turn on the turntable and watch the soldier spinning around the turntable. Note that he ALWAYS faces the center post of the turntable; yet he is glued to the record so he can not be turning on his own vertical axis.

Guess what, the moon is to the earth as is the soldier to the turntable.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by Stewie
 


I'm with you on this one. I do not believe the moon rotates on its OWN vertical axis. However it does revolve around the earth and rotates around the earth's vertical axis. I saw the video and its interesting, and understand the simple experiment mentioned above, but I have one of my own, to prove the moon does not rotate on its own vertical axis. It involves getting out some of your old stuff from your childhood and young adult days.

Gather an 'old fashioned' turntable; an old vinyl record you don't care about; an old fashioned plastic toy soldier on its own standup base; and some glue.

Now put the record on the turntable.

Next, glue the toy soldier onto the outer edge of the record (which is why I say take one you don't care about) facing the center post of the turntable poking through the record. Wait for the glue to dry.

Finally turn on the turntable and watch the soldier spinning around the turntable. Note that he ALWAYS faces the center post of the turntable; yet he is glued to the record so he can not be turning on his own vertical axis.

Guess what, the moon is to the earth as is the soldier to the turntable.



[edit on 26-7-2010 by Sashromi]



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:02 PM
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Yes! I started noticing this maybe a month or two ago. Also, what should be Venus had become extremely bright and perhaps even appeared larger to me. When I pointed these things out to my friends, I either got no response or got called a "dumbass". Maybe it's just the increased sun activity and things are not just heating up, but also getting brighter?



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
reply to post by Stewie
 


Stewie...what do you mean "some astronomers say" the Moon doesn't rotate???


NO astronomer worth his/her salt would say that!!!!

ONLY the crackpots, I suppose...the Moon rotates about its axis, there is NO DOUBT whatsoever amongst scientists and astronomers ( valid astronomers, at least...
)

Anyone who says it doesn't rotate, or there are "degrees of discussion" on it are flat out wrong!

Sorry, but that sort of disinfo (even the slgihtest hint of it) should never go unchallenged, on the ATS forums. Deny ignorance.


Because pictures convey info much better than ten thousand words can, here:




Keep in mind that is a simplistic representation....the Moon actually orbits in an ellipse (as do all planets also, about the Sun).



If it rotates on it's axis then why only see one side in all this time?

[edit on 26-7-2010 by Come Clean]



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by Stewie
reply to post by Erasurehead
 

The moon could be locked by gravity. It does not HAVE to be rotating.
Christ.

Maybe, this time, read my link.

www.grantchronicles.com...



[edit on 26-7-2010 by Stewie]


Either way, whether the moon is tethered by gravity or is in synchronized rotation, it is still rotating. A ball tethered by a string is being forced to rotate itself towards the stick by the string. This is exactly the same theory because either way the moon has to rotate...



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


I'm raising the BS flag on this. Even your own video proves it doesn't rotate on it's axis. If I look at the red side only (of your video) then some parts of the Earth would see the other side of the moon.

Are you telling me China sees the other side of the moon every night?



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:08 PM
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Originally posted by dbloch7986
reply to post by westcoast
 


There was nothing strange or nefarious about it.


Nothing nefarious certainly. but it's something that happens only on occasion, and can you explain why it happens? You said you've seen it that bright before; what makes the difference between that and the dimmer moons? It must have a cause, and I just came to this thread, and have been demanding answers, looking for that cause. I have not seen a sufficient explanation -- especially not the "Thunder Moon" junk which seems to have absolutely nothing to do with the brightness!

So, you say you've seen it that bright before. I believe you obviously. I presume that you have also seen it dimmer before. What makes the difference?


There's people here saying "its never been that bright" or "why was it that bright worldwide".

Well id like evidence of both of those claims.


Obviously we only have anecdotal evidence in this case, but on the very first page, we have people stating residency in both California and Australia who observed it. I live in colorado, and I observed it too. So there's some roughly reasonable evidence for the second claim.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by Sashromi
 


Excellent point Sash. It does not rotate. It revolves.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:13 PM
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Originally posted by Erasurehead


Put a chair in the middle of the room, stand a few feet away from the chair facing it. Now walk (orbit) around the chair to the opposite side without rotating your body. Your back will now be facing the chair.

No real astronomer thinks that the moon doesn't rotate on its axis.


I think your experiment proves the moon doesn't rotate on it's own axis.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:14 PM
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Nothing "rotates" when you use the rotating object as the frame of reference. Duh. This is not some huge revelation.

In the frame of reference of the earth, the sun, or any other object in the solar system, the moon IS rotating, though.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:16 PM
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Originally posted by Sashromi
reply to post by Stewie
 


I'm with you on this one. I do not believe the moon rotates on its OWN vertical axis. However it does revolve around the earth and rotates around the earth's vertical axis. I saw the video and its interesting, and understand the simple experiment mentioned above, but I have one of my own, to prove the moon does not rotate on its own vertical axis. It involves getting out some of your old stuff from your childhood and young adult days.

Gather an 'old fashioned' turntable; an old vinyl record you don't care about; an old fashioned plastic toy soldier on its own standup base; and some glue.

Now put the record on the turntable.

Next, glue the toy soldier onto the outer edge of the record (which is why I say take one you don't care about) facing the center post of the turntable poking through the record. Wait for the glue to dry.

Finally turn on the turntable and watch the soldier spinning around the turntable. Note that he ALWAYS faces the center post of the turntable; yet he is glued to the record so he can not be turning on his own vertical axis.

Guess what, the moon is to the earth as is the soldier to the turntable.



Your theory doesn't disprove anything. The moon is not glued to a flat surface, rather it is tethered by gravity. Either way the tethered theory does not disprove the conventional theory because they are the same. Either way the moon has to rotate.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:16 PM
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PS...yeah my back is to the chair but China's front is facing it. Guess what, even they see the same side as we do.

A better experiment would be to have two people on opposite sides of that chair. At what point will one of those people view the opposite side of the moon?

Answer....never.

Because it doesn't rotate on it's own axis.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


The term is 'tide locked' the moon isn't rotating in any kind of synchosity, it is merely locked with it's centre of mass nearest the earth........
Since NASA let off a bomb (a small nuke maybe?) on the moon some months ago, maybe that would 'shed some light ' on the matter

IMO it was NASA destroying some evidence of some kind that may be visible from earth




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