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Does the moon look extremly bright to anyone else?

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posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by SwissPort905v2
 


It was a special day of astrological significance yesterday. Called Guru Purnima or the full moon of the Guru




posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:39 PM
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Scientists baffled by unusual upper atmosphere shrinkage




(CNN) -- An upper layer of Earth's atmosphere recently shrank so much that researchers are at a loss to adequately explain it, NASA said on Thursday.

By Derrick Ho, Special to CNN July 17, 2010 12:07 a.m. EDT

www.cnn.com...

I really think the brightness has something to do with the atomosphere guys.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:40 PM
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The true full moon is tonight...July 26th.

So I guess it will be even more grand.

Last night was not a total full moon, but very close.

As you look for it tonight, realize that the Sun is on one side of you..and the moon is on the other....during full moon, the Earth sits in between the moon and sun.

Its a great time to align yourself with the cosmos. When you face the moon, know you are facing the direction of Capricorn, the one who guards the mountain tops.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:59 PM
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Towards the end of August Mars will be so large that it will appear that we have 2 moons. The moon could appear brighter and fuller because of some refelectivity issues from the Mars approach.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 02:08 PM
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Less atmosphere means more light entering the atmosphere correct?



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by Come Clean
 


No the light is the same. Clearer air - less pollution - means the light is less diffuse and therefore makes things look brighter.

The amount of pollution in the atmosphere depends on many factors including weather and any local forest fires.

The Moon isnt any brighter than usual. But sometimes due to pollution it may be duler than usual.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by Essan
 


Watch for the full moon next month, and you will notice that this month is a nice bright full moon...more so then SOMETIMES (but not unusually bright).

Next months full moon will be at its furtherest from Earth for the whole year so it likely wont be as bright and popping in the sky as this months.

This months is likely to be more popping then nexts.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by Essan
reply to post by Come Clean
 


No the light is the same. Clearer air - less pollution - means the light is less diffuse and therefore makes things look brighter.

The amount of pollution in the atmosphere depends on many factors including weather and any local forest fires.

The Moon isn't any brighter than usual. But sometimes due to pollution it may be duler than usual.



I'm led to believe if I were sitting out in space the Sun would appear WHITE. Out in space there is no atmosphere to diffuse the light rays. Makes sense to me that a shrinkage in the atmosphere would make the Moon, and Sun for that matter, appear brighter.


In popular culture, the Sun is yellow. But did you know that the color of the Sun is actually white? It’s only when light from the Sun passes through the Earth’s atmosphere that in changes in color, from white, to the yellow we see here on Earth.

www.universetoday.com...

So I respectfully disagree with your statement. If the atmosphere has shrunk then less reflextion is taking place. In other words, if there were no atmosphere then the sun would be bright white. Thus, the moon would reflect bright white light our way at night.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 02:33 PM
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Actually, now I do have a real question.

Is it brighter or whiter? I really think these are two different things.

Brighter, to me, means more reflection from the Sun. Which falls along the solar flare theory.

Whiter, to me, means less diffusion of the Sun's rays. Which falls along the shrinking atmosphere or less pollution theory.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 02:37 PM
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A person standing on Earth and another person floating in space would see two different things when looking at the moon at the exact same time. The one in outer space will see a whiter moon. It's brightness hasn't changed but the amount of diffusion has.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 02:43 PM
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Does the moon rotate?
Some astronomers say yes. Some astronomers say no.

(Most say yes, but it is incredibly funny to me there is not universal agreement. I mean, it's RIGHT THERE.)

It is true we only see one side, but why? To be rotating, it has to rotate in perfect synchronicity with the Earth, or we would see all sides of the moon eventually. It is easier for me to believe that it does not rotate at all.

Anyway, it may be brighter because in perigee it is closest to the Earth, and in apogee it is furthest away. Solar activity could play a part.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by Stewie
 


The answer is definitely yes the moon rotates. Tidal locking keeps the rotation in sync with the earth so we only see the near side facing earth at all time.

en.wikipedia.org...

Tidal locking occurs when the gravitational gradient makes one side of an astronomical body always face another; for example, one side of the Earth's Moon always faces the Earth. A tidally locked body takes just as long to rotate around its own axis as it does to revolve around its partner.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by Erasurehead
 

Oh yeah?

www.grantchronicles.com...

Like I said, most astronomers agree with you, but it gets a bit technical on what "rotate" actually means. For instance, If I have the face of the moon (that we see) attached by a rope to say a vehicle on the Earth that is circling the globe at the same speed the moon is, the moon would be behaving essentially as it does now. From other points in space, the moon would appear to be rotating, but it would not HAVE to be rotating to give the illusion.

Interesting, anyway.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 03:21 PM
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Originally posted by DrJay1975
Towards the end of August Mars will be so large that it will appear that we have 2 moons. The moon could appear brighter and fuller because of some refelectivity issues from the Mars approach.


No it won't. This is one of those stupid rumors that makes its rounds every year or so. Mars will NEVER be close enough to appear to us as another moon. If it did, the acceleration it would have to undergo would be ASTOUNDING. It may look very bright, and perhaps larger than usual, but it will not look like a second moon, at least ont in any sense by which that would mean anything.

As to the people claiming that they have explained it, especially the Thunder Moon people: Can you PLEASE explain to me what the physical processes are supposed to be which make the moon brighter WORLDWIDE this month? From the links you're providing, it should be this much brighter EVERY july, yet, like I said, the previous occurences of this "phenomenon" are not that regular. So could you PLEASE answer my questions?



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 03:25 PM
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well if the moon is brighter that has to mean the sun is brighter so maybe it has to do with the sun changing.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 03:27 PM
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Originally posted by westcoast
reply to post by SwissPort905v2
 


You know, I have been struggling with that one. I have been thinking that it seems a bit 'rotated'....just not right. BUT I am not an avid moon watcher or astronomer, so I don't know anything about positioning or rotating. Probably perfectly normal...but you are not alone.


Moon seems brighter: YES!

Is there more Sunlight / radiation from our Sun towards the planets (and f.e. Eart's Moon) in our Solar system?

Is the Earth slightly 'wobbleïng' ?

Am by far no astronomer or scientist, so can anyone explain me what's going on?



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 03:50 PM
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Originally posted by Stewie
Does the moon rotate?
Some astronomers say yes. Some astronomers say no.

(Most say yes, but it is incredibly funny to me there is not universal agreement. I mean, it's RIGHT THERE.)

It is true we only see one side, but why? To be rotating, it has to rotate in perfect synchronicity with the Earth, or we would see all sides of the moon eventually. It is easier for me to believe that it does not rotate at all.

Anyway, it may be brighter because in perigee it is closest to the Earth, and in apogee it is furthest away. Solar activity could play a part.





I think a better question is does the moon rotate on it's axis. From our vantage point it does not rotate on it's axis. Put it like this, think of a father holding his little girls hands and spinning her around and around. She is not rotating on her axis. If she were then at some point daddy would be holding her feet instead of her hands. In other words, at some point we would see the far side of the moon.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 03:57 PM
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Last night, here in Portugal, i was smoking in the window at 2 AM, and i noticed how more bright and white it was.
I was forced to look away after2 to 5 seconds, because it starts to hurt my eyes also!
In 40 Years of life, it is the first time the Moon hurts my eyes, like the Sun, just to look to it!




[edit on 26/7/10 by Umbra Sideralis]



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:06 PM
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This is why I keep coming back to this site...
Last night I was sitting outside drinking some tea and I noticed the brilliant white brightness of the moon. What a sight!

I figured it was just closer to Earth or the air was especially clear because we had storms clear out earlier. Now that I see this thread, I know it was not just me thinking it was brighter/whiter.

Cool stuff.


Might be coincidence, but isn't today somewhat significant when it comes to astrology? Like some conjunction or cardinal cross climax? I really don't know astrology so I am just regurgitating what I hear... but maybe it is extra brilliant for a reason - maybe it marks the beginning of something?



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by Come Clean

Scientists baffled by unusual upper atmosphere shrinkage




(CNN) -- An upper layer of Earth's atmosphere recently shrank so much that researchers are at a loss to adequately explain it, NASA said on Thursday.

By Derrick Ho, Special to CNN July 17, 2010 12:07 a.m. EDT

www.cnn.com...

I really think the brightness has something to do with the atomosphere guys.

The density of the thermosphere is so low to what's down here near seal level, the effect it would have on light passing through it is negligible. There is a million times more air molecules at sea level than in even the densest part of the thermosphere.

In other words, the light from the moon passes through more air in the 6 inches in front of your eyeballs than in the entire thermosphere.




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