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Wal-Mart Radio Tags to Track Clothing .

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posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 08:11 AM
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Wal-Mart Radio Tags to Track Clothing .


online.wsj.com

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. plans to roll out sophisticated electronic ID tags to track individual pairs of jeans and underwear, the first step in a system that advocates say better controls inventory but some critics say raises privacy concerns.

Starting next month, the retailer will place removable "smart tags" on individual garments that can be read by a hand-held scanner. Wal-Mart workers will be able to quickly learn, for instance, which size of Wrangler jeans is missing, with the aim of ensuring shelves are optimally stocked and inventory tightly watched. If successful, the radio-frequenc
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 08:11 AM
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So pretty much, privacy is becoming inexistant. The world's largest retailer is going to now be able to track their products, even after you've left the store.


They also worry that retailers will be able to scan customers who carry new types of personal ID cards as they walk through a store, without their knowledge. Several states, including Washington and New York, have begun issuing enhanced driver's licenses that contain radio- frequency tags with unique ID numbers, to make border crossings easier for frequent travelers. Some privacy advocates contend that retailers could theoretically scan people with such licenses as they make purchases, combine the info with their credit card data, and then know the person's identity the next time they stepped into the store.


And this might be the scariest part. They could potentially have access to all of your information and your location at any given time. Sounds like Big Brother to me, without the obvious CCTV cameras, but this may just be more efficient than simple cameras.

Conspiracy?

online.wsj.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 08:21 AM
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Well its not so easy placing a chip in everyones hand yet, so everything they buy will do for now. Clothes, hammers, even paper money. I wonder if the chip in our bank cards will have a link to the chip in the items we purchase with it?

www.securityfocus.com...



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 08:26 AM
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What part of removable is such a huge concern? And what's new about this story? This has been going on forever. More "recycled news."



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 08:31 AM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


Well if they can sell it to people that it is a safe method, than people may not even go through with the hassle of removing it. And even once it's removed, it'll still be tracked with you until you get home and remove it. And like the article states, it can sit in your garbage and it may be used to read information.

The privacy problems extend past the whole idea of just tracking clothing.



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 08:41 AM
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So are we saying that Wal-Mart is innovative in controlling their inventory? Or are we accusing Big Brother of trying to get into our pants?
Either pull the tags and drop them in the trash before you leave or don't shop there.



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 09:01 AM
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Ok, no that I like to buy the Chinese trash that Wallyworld-mart sells, but I am very interested into some information from our ATS tech amateurs people on how to kill this embedded radio tags before they can cause a problem and that includes the driving licenses also just in case.

I just want to make sure I kill whatever is in mine here in GA that I am not aware off.



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by marg6043
 

I seem remember a story from a few years ago that claimed the Chinese were weaving the tracking chips right into the microfiber so that no one could remove it...or something like that.



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


Well looking at the history of the chips, we all know that if the government and private entities can not make people to wear them on under their skin . . . now the way to make people accept them will be with the HCR and digital records, then medications, now in our clothing, (something they are doing for years) but the technology is getting more sophisticated and in almost all the plastic we have and carry, either by choice or just because is related to work and government like driver licenses.

Well I be darn if I am going to parade my information on me so some asswise can scan it out of me.



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 11:31 AM
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Hm, slowly and slowly...pushing for mandatory rfid implanets...they must be really desperate.



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by Cybernet
 


You are so right is not funny, just with the passing of the HCR, mandatory digital records and now big chips companies already working on implantable monitored time release medications the sky is the limit. . .



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 11:36 AM
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reply to post by marg6043
 


Oh, I'm not laughing at or avoiding discussion of the possibility or maybe even inevitability of the use and abuse of chips. Just at the way the stories are sometimes presented.

I had the chips removed from my puppy and parrot (both came with them). And I cut off all labels anyway and magnetize my license. Not that it'll really help in the long run, but it makes me feel better that I'm doing something (aside from writing to Congress and keeping up to speed on the potential abuses) to protect me and mine for as long as possible.

It's hard to separate the benefits from the dangers of technology, isn't it?




[edit on 7/23/2010 by ~Lucidity]



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 11:51 AM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


The private companies that make chips and corporate America are trying to force their implantable goods on everything to the point that we will have not longer any choices in the matter, then the government will step in as they will take back stage so no to look like big brother taking over, as usual.

The problem with WalMart doing this now and introducing expensive and more invasive technology is because the are right now along with Target the two biggest retail corporations in the US, so big that they control now from the retail numbers in the nation and service employment also.

They are monopolies, the can afford the technology and they are backed by the companies that are pushing it also.

Just wait when target start doing the same, when companies become monopolies like in retail they are to enslave everybody that depend on the goods they offer.

The same will go with mandatory HCR and government subside Medicaid.

Now, you can find wallets that can protect your cards and already richips on some of your more personal information, the wallets came about after the scare when DC and NY introduced the driver licenses with radio tags and some businesses also for identification.



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 11:52 AM
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Originally posted by Portugoal
reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


Well if they can sell it to people that it is a safe method, than people may not even go through with the hassle of removing it. And even once it's removed, it'll still be tracked with you until you get home and remove it. And like the article states, it can sit in your garbage and it may be used to read information.


Did you even read the article you posted?? The piece in the garment is not the reader... So please explain how it could be in your garage reading your info?? Or ... NVM not worth it.. Keep up the diligent work.. Please tell us when the start putting chips in our pets.. THEN I will be worried.


The privacy problems extend past the whole idea of just tracking clothing.


[edit on 23-7-2010 by Mobius1974]



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 11:58 AM
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I think it might be more fun to buy the jeans, leave the tag on and let them spend their time tracking us walking down the street - don't forget to save your receipt



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 12:02 PM
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reply to post by Mobius1974
 


The article itself explain how this new and improved technology that uses radio waves can store information on discarded tags even if they are taken out of the garment and put in the trash.

The concern is of how much information will be in the tags linked to the consumer, like consumer spending habits that can be trace every time the person walks into the store.

This is not science fiction, this is been in the works for decade, we in the US are after all the biggest consumers of goods in the world, (at least for now)

Now the second problem is as "per article" that the new scanners can also read information from far away on people walking into the stores that carry already cards or driver licenses already with the same type of chips.

Is already two states that are using driver licenses that can be read from far away by scanners, DC and NY many other states are already working on the same technology as is very expensive.

So yes this is been in the working and getting very close to our front doors, or let say our pockets, wallets and hang bags, and shopping malls.

Exploitable to the max.



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 12:15 PM
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Just so everyone knows, these "smart-tags" will not be in all Wal-Mart stores "beginning next month" as the WSJ article implies. As with everything of this nature, it will be rolled-out in certain test markets first, and then if it is deemed successful it will be implemented nationwide.

I work as a manager at Wal-Mart, and if my market implements this at all (and that's a big if), it will not be for at least 3-4 months.

This part of the article made me chuckle:

"And while the tags wouldn't replace bulkier shoplifting sensors, Wal-Mart expects they'll cut down on employee theft because it will be easier to see if something's gone missing from the back room."

My store is the best in the market, and we average about 40% accuracy on our weekly backroom audits.



[edit on 23-7-2010 by AdmireTheDistance]



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by AdmireTheDistance
 


The proponents of this tags are using all kind of excuses even putting down their own stores workers to find a reason why they need this new technology in their stores.

But for those that follow the newest trend on this type of privacy invasion knows it has nothing to do with the employees but rather the consumers.

All the reason for Rchips to exist and to have millions if not billions of dollars invested in them is because eventually the makers expect that we all will carry the darn bugs in our skin "by government mandate.



posted on Jul, 23 2010 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by Mobius1974
 




Honestly, I welcome opinions that differ from mine but your post was just laughable. You're telling me to read the article? Maybe you should and then try to discredit what I've written.



posted on Jul, 25 2010 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by Portugoal
 





Sanjay Sarma, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology says "The tags don't have any personal information. They are essentially barcodes with serial numbers attached. And you can easily remove them."

In Europe some retailers put the smart labels on hang tags, which are then removed at checkout. That still provides the inventory-control benefit of RFID, but it takes away other important potential uses that retailers and suppliers like, such as being able to track the item all the way back to the point of manufacture in case of a recall, or making sure it isn't counterfeit.


Talk about some valuable information even if they could attach it to your name and address!

"Soo Mr. Smith, we know you're a size 40 waist!"



Could have easily just looked at the guy's waist and had an idea or fished the tag from the trash can.

I'm totally not worried over this.

If you want something to worry about, maybe get concerned over the ones that are on prescription bottles. Certain expensive medications have fancy labels on them. I think these are only used to prevent employees from stealing them, but I'm not sure. I've seen the same labels on the insides of DVDs. I think they're only used in attempt to prevent theft, but I could be wrong.

There's a book "Spychips" (found that from the article) that has a lot more info on this. I'm not sure I'd want to fill my head with all those paranoid ideas though..even if it is remotely possible.




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