7 Submerged Wonders of the World

page: 4
119
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join

posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 12:05 AM
link   
reply to post by AlienCarnage
 


like i said, it's the big elephant in the room. the reason we said it was myth 300 years ago was because our science hadn't gotten far enough to recognize it was scientifically possible in the first place and because the old texts didn't appear to corroborate each other often enough. so for 300 years, universities have advanced the theory that none of it was real, only to be proven wrong again and again, as ancient historical sites mentioned in the old texts, were dug up from the ground. now we have geologists from oxford and so on, discovering the flood did happen and in the right time frame. troy did exist. the ancient greeks could write. it's a lie to say ancient history is a myth and as a result, the big elephant continues to be ignored.




posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 12:54 AM
link   

Originally posted by Maegnas

Originally posted by Leonardo01

"The hymn 1.50 of the Rigveda on the Sun, says
[O Sun] you who traverse 2,202 yojanas in half a nimesa.The usual meaning of yojana is about 9 miles as in the Artha´saastra and for nimisha.
The measures of time are thus defined in the Puranas:
15 nimesa = 1 kastha
30kastha= 1 kala
30 kala = 1 muhurta
30 muhurta = 1 day-and-night

A nimesa is therefore equal to 16/75 seconds. It does come very close to the correct figure of 186,000 miles per second.”


So, 30x30x30x15 is 405,000 nimesas in one day, right? That corresponds to 86400 seconds in a day, right? So, by using the Windows calculator we have the ratio of 0.213 (that's how many seconds are in a nimesa). now, according to the humn, [the Sun] travels 2,202 yojanas in half a nimesa, that's (2,202x9/0.213)x2 miles per second, right? That gives 185794 miles per second, remarkably close to the actual value of the speed of light.


Only if you take Leonardo's word for the length of a yojana, which I would advise against:


The length of the Yojana varied depending on the different standards adopted by different Indian astronomers. In the Surya Siddhanta of the 5th century, for example, a Yojana was equivalent to 5 miles,[1] and the same was true for Aryabhata's Aryabhatiya (499).[2] By the time of Paramesvara in the 14th century, the Yojana was more than 1.5 times larger than it was in Aryabhata's time, thus a Yojana was equivalent to at least 8 miles by Paramesvara's time.[1]

Religious scholar A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada gives the equivalent length of a yojana as 8 miles (13 km) [3] throughout his translations of the Puranic scriptures. Some traditional Indian scholars give measurements between 13 km and 16 km (8-10 miles) or thereabouts.[citation needed] Alexander Cunningham, in The Ancient Geography of India, takes a yojana to mean 8 miles.


Source: Wiki

Given that the referenced text (Rig Veda) dates to around 1100 BC, it is to my mind more logical to take one of the earlier measures given above, and that would likely be wrong as well, just not as wrong as the later defined lengths of a yojana - the nine miles length dates to the 1300's AD.

As usual, you can make anything look "ASTOUNDING!!!" if you get to pick the numbers you use (exactly like pyramidology.)

Harte



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 02:29 AM
link   
I love skeptics, for I am one myself.

Let us go through a process of ratiocination that what most people misleadingly term as"common sense" and exclude the definition of a yojana altogether which was your main point of contention .



The Definition of time unit Nimish can be found in ShrimadhBhagwat(ii,11-3 TO 10) WHERE IT IS MENTIONED THAT 15 NIMISHAS MAKE 1 Kashta,15 kashtas make 1 laghu, 30 laghus make 1 muhurtas and 30 muhurtas make 1 Diva-ratri

Depicted as below:

15 Nimish = 1 Kashth
30 Kashth = 1 Kaal ( 30 * 15 Nimish = 450 Nimish)
30 Kaal = 1 Muhurt ( 450 * 30 Nimish = 13500 Nimish)
30 Muhurt = 1 Ahoratr ( 13500 * 30 Nimish = 405000 Nimish)
1 Ahoratr = 1 Day (24 Hours)

So; 1 Day = 24 * 60 * 60 Seconds = 86400 Seconds correct?

Thus we have:

86400 Seconds = 405000 Nimish

1 Second = 4.69 Nimish
1 Nimish = .214 Second

3X10^8 m/s upto two significant digits a value quite accurate as we know it today
A nimesa is therefore equal to 16/75 seconds. It indeed does come very close to the correct figure of 186,000 miles per second.”

Do you still advocate that my hypothesis is flawed?.... the rigveda also postulates that light consists of three primary colors(webcache.googleusercontent.com...:jNDyZJjohCMJ:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light+speed+of+light+in+rigveda,+nasa&cd=1&hl=en&ct=cln k&gl=in).Pretty #ing amazing, I would say.







[edit on 26-7-2010 by Leonardo01]



posted on Jul, 28 2010 @ 04:29 PM
link   
Words can't convey so many wonders to behold this world has to offer us.



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 04:59 AM
link   
Very nice.

S&F as well as friended for similar intrests.

Ill be waiting for this other work of yours


LittleIndianJr.



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 02:34 AM
link   

Originally posted by Leonardo01
I love skeptics, for I am one myself.

Let us go through a process of ratiocination that what most people misleadingly term as"common sense" and exclude the definition of a yojana altogether which was your main point of contention .

Leonardo,

If you "exclude the definition of a yojana," you are excluding the only contention I had.

However, you didn't exactly exclude it did you?

See:

Originally posted by Leonardo01

3X10^8 m/s upto two significant digits a value quite accurate as we know it today
A nimesa is therefore equal to 16/75 seconds. It indeed does come very close to the correct figure of 186,000 miles per second.”

Do you still advocate that my hypothesis is flawed?....

So, of course I still so advocate. After all, you use a flawed value for your distance measurement in calculating the value I bolded above.


Originally posted by Leonardo01the rigveda also postulates that light consists of three primary colors(webcache.googleusercontent.com...:jNDyZJjohCMJ:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light+speed+of+light+in+rigveda,+nasa&cd=1&hl=en&ct=cln k&gl=in).Pretty #ing amazing, I would say.

Here's a link to that book of the RigVeda (Book 1, Adi Parva, of the Mahabharata.)

That's the same translation as your wiki link credits.

I wonder if you'd mind finding that in there for us?

At any rate, I wouldn't dispute that this part is amazing. I would say it's not astounding. Indians were capable of seeing, and light's components are easily visible when it shines through any beveled crystal or glass.

Harte





new topics

top topics
 
119
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join