Mars. The Red Planet, Not?

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posted on Jul, 25 2010 @ 07:06 AM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
The Moon rotates on its axis. Just as Mars does. Just as Earth does.


I agree with everything in your post except this. The moon does not spin on it's axis, it is tidally locked to the Earth.

http:/en.wikipedia.org...

Therefore we can only see 1 side from the Earth, ever.




posted on Jul, 25 2010 @ 07:55 AM
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Originally posted by thov420

The moon does not spin on it's axis, it is tidally locked to the Earth.



This is wrong. The moon DOES rotate/spin on it's axis, but it rotates only once during its orbit around Earth and that is excactly the reason we only see one side ("the near side") of it from our little place in the universe.

But this little video explains the moon's rotation far better than a dummy like me could ever hope to to with words.





posted on Jul, 25 2010 @ 09:16 AM
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reply to post by ziggystar60
 


I stand corrected.

Thank you for that vid, star for you!



posted on Jul, 25 2010 @ 11:11 AM
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reply to post by ziggystar60
 


I also thank you for this video. Never saw that as a visual aid....I just showed it to my kids and now THEY understand why the phases of the moon occur!




[edit on 7/25/10 by StonyJ]



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 01:18 PM
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This spin orbit coupling also explains why there are more lunar maria on the near side. i dont really want to get too into it, but the moons core is offset to the earth or near side.



posted on Jul, 29 2010 @ 08:57 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Phage I think that by "the dark side" he meant the side that never faces earth.
Yes it does get light and I don't believe that the dark side is the appropriate word.



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 12:11 AM
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The color of the Mars sky at its apex is blue violet. I can say this because the color wavelength of the sky in the Rover images is brightest when the 432 nm. Filter is used. Go to: marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov... There you will see comparative images of the Mars sky. Click on the lightest one and you will see that its wavelength is 432 nm. The 432nm wavelength filter allows only blue violet and white light to pass through it.



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 12:15 AM
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great pictures and nice find. Makes you wonder what else they have as surprise pictures later.



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 12:18 AM
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Sorry, The nasa sight didn't allow me to post the exact address so here it is long hand:

marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov... p149.html



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 12:23 AM
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Sorry again I guess above top secret wont let me give the exact address either. I think there's enough info though in my second post to get you there if you work at it.



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 04:28 AM
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reply to post by okdon
 


You can post it by creating a link to it.

You just have to click on the button that looks like this:




posted on Jul, 26 2013 @ 12:16 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 





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