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Cornershot allows user to shoot around corners

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posted on Jun, 16 2004 @ 06:40 PM
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I searched ATS for this and couldn't come up with anything.



This is pretty cool. It has a camera and a screen on it so the user can see and shoot around corners without exposure. Taken from www.cornershot.com...




posted on Jun, 16 2004 @ 06:45 PM
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I saw a thing like that on some show about the Land Warrior system. The soldier had this thing over one eye that was connected to a camera on the gun. What if someone sneaks up on you and you have the gun pointed sideways? Better hope you practiced like that lol. Thats a cool pic



posted on Jun, 16 2004 @ 11:05 PM
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the germans had somthing like that for their MP44. it was basically a curved pice of pipe you stuck on the end of the berrel. it worked but wore out after about 2000 shots



posted on Jun, 16 2004 @ 11:56 PM
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Looks like that rig is biased for right-hand corners. The screen on the left side will be cumbersome for left turns, won't it ?

Reminds me of an anecdote I saw, I think in "A Rumor of War" that the most common battlefield injury in Vietnam after 1968 or so was a bullet to the rt. hand.

This came about as both sides got used to shooting on full auto, and would spray around the corner, or over the berm of a rice patty. Kill rates per unit of ammo plummetted.

Also, when the Prussians began sending "Jaeger" forward units ahead of infantry columns in their initial push in the 1840's, many nations refused to copy the tactic, fearing that it would excuse cowardice if men began hiding behind bushes and in ditches. The shirkers could later claim they were looking for a perfect shot, when they were really just scared.

Americans in the Revolutionary war had used this tactic; they would have some men advance ahead of the main column who would shoot and feign retreat & charge. To the British commanders this seemed indecisive, hence the "Yankee Doodle," running back and forth into battle without ever engaging. And Greene's mountain boys hiding behind bushes looked like total cowardice. The traditional signal of surrender was a white feather: "Stuck a feather in his hat." I'm not sure about the macaroni bit, however.

Anyhoo, do you think the above pictured gizmo would make soldiers TOO cautious, or is that just being silly?



posted on Jun, 17 2004 @ 12:03 AM
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to me it looks just like another thing that could break... what if the gun gets jammed sideways? or the camera shot? and i'm sure that hunk of junk has some sort of computer. so what if that crashes?



posted on Jun, 17 2004 @ 12:08 AM
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I can see what you are saying Dr_S, however, I don't think that it is a sign of cowardice. If you were a soldier and there was something that might save you life in battle, wouldn't you want everything that could do that?



posted on Jun, 17 2004 @ 12:15 AM
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When I saw this I immediately thought of the IMI multi-purpose rifle system (MPRS) project. Jane's Defense did a piece on it recently. It requires registration or a subscription so I will post a bit of it here.

A powerful force multiplier is being showcased by IMI, adding intelligence gathering to the capabilities of the multi-purpose rifle system (MPRS). Developed as a result of intensive co-operation with the Israel Defence Force, this incorporates first-hand experience gained in urban warfare.

Due to be released this summer, MPRS has been designed for assault rifles such as the M4, SA80, FAMAS, the IDF's Tavor and others, which can serve as part of integrated soldier systems. One of two new capabilities resulting from this development is the quite remarkable intelligence air burst ammunition, which meets some demands of the digital battlefield. It supports information gathering from 'over-the-hill' scenarios taking place in non-line-of-sight (NLOS) areas, providing real-time intelligence without the need to endanger life or engage UAVs.

Based on the original air burst ammunition configuration, the intelligent round replaces the lethal payload with a digital camera and wireless configurations. The soldier's fire is controlled by the sight, which focuses on suspicious areas, while the camera begins to photograph immediately after firing. A hand-held computer manually receives images and the soldier can view real-time intelligence, fast-forwarding or reversing the film as required. Firing data provide target co-ordinates.

Jane's Infantry Weapons



[edit on 17-6-2004 by Spectre]



posted on Jun, 17 2004 @ 08:51 AM
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The Cornershot is not really a weapon, rather a platform for a weapon, ie pistol. If the Cornershot were to get damaged in battle the soldier can easily detach the pistol and resume battle al beit with deminished performance .(Geez I damaged my F88 cocking-piece during training exercise and I was Airforce) - I truely think the Cornershot needs a lot of structural support especially if it were to be used in urban enviroments where small strike teams are running from corner to corner and whipping the platform around a corner. It will inevitably break.

I do like the idea though, it looks and operates like a breeze.

[edit on 17-6-2004 by Ezekial]



posted on Jun, 17 2004 @ 10:15 AM
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Originally posted by nyarlathotep
I can see what you are saying Dr_S, however, I don't think that it is a sign of cowardice. If you were a soldier and there was something that might save you life in battle, wouldn't you want everything that could do that?


I agree with you completely from the individual soldier's perspective. What I was thinking of is from a command perspective.

The original reason for close order drill was to make the men stand shoulder to shoulder and take the same size of footstep with each beat. In the early days of infantry, individual soldiers would take 'baby steps' when ordered to advance under fire.

I'm thinking that from a command perspective, the cornershot might add to that universal impulse. Would be great for SWAT and other situations where the enemy is holed up w/ limited target visibility.

But when taking fellujah or tikrit, the best "cornershot" is still a concussion grenade, isn't it?



posted on Jun, 17 2004 @ 10:22 AM
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Here's an older thread about this weapon. (Not to take attention away from this one, but I just wanted to boast about my searching skills.
)

www.abovetopsecret.com...

This weapon looks too gaudy for my taste, but at least it would keep me out of the line of fire.



posted on Jun, 17 2004 @ 03:27 PM
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Originally posted by RogueX
I saw a thing like that on some show about the Land Warrior system. The soldier had this thing over one eye that was connected to a camera on the gun. What if someone sneaks up on you and you have the gun pointed sideways? Better hope you practiced like that lol. Thats a cool pic






Yeah i saw that show too they were talking about a multi purpose new army rifle prototype, that had a capability to shoot around corners without bending due to cameras. It could fire an explosive granade round that you can program to explode at any range not just on contact.
Its name was the XM-29.

[edit on 17-6-2004 by WestPoint23]



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