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EMT Accused Of Ignoring Dying Woman Is Killed [NYC]

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posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:10 PM
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Originally posted by nh_ee
But Unfortunately, this individual's past actions had cumulatively debited his karmic account which inevitably lead to his early demise.

His final test was this incident at the Bakery. With his selfish actions at the bakery that day a mere reflection upon how selfishly he had lead his life.

He apparently had used up all of his credits bringing his account balance to Zero.


So, should we not prosecute murder any longer? I mean, this guy failed his "final test" and his early death was then "inevitable."

You know NOTHING about the man's life, except for the incident described in the OP. Sure, you can deduce that he wasn't a man of sterling character since human instinct should have pushed him to assist, but that's still assuming facts not in evidence.

And yet you sit here and tell us that you know exactly why this murder occurred - it's because of his "past actions" (again, of which you know NOTHING) and his failing his "final test." And you don't even know what transpired between him and his assailant before the shooting, do you?

By this rationale, you should be able to shoot at random people, since only the ones who have failed their "final tests" will die. Hey, you're just an "Agent of Karma" then. I'm sure we'll hear that excuse from some future mass murderer.

Seriously, when will people stop acting as if they have inside information on things they actually know nothing about?

[edit on 7/19/10 by mothershipzeta]




posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by Miraj
 


Step 1

Help the person to an upright sitting position. Breathing is easiest when sitting up, not when lying down. Try having them straddle a chair backwards and prop their elbows on the back of it.

Step 2

Ask the person what needs to be done. Sometimes asthmatics carry an information card with instructions for when an asthma attack occurs. If this is the case, simply follow the instructions on the card.

Step 3

Locate the person's inhaler. This information may also be on a card. If the person does not have an inhaler, and someone else has one, it is generally accepted for the person having the attack to take the other person's medicine (providing it is the same one they take). If they are unable to do it themselves, hold the inhaler a few inches back from their mouth and spray it in. Using a spacer, or a piece of paper rolled up to create this distance, also works well. Wait several seconds, then deliver a second spray. Up to 4 sprays can be delivered.

Step 4

Assess the situation. If a change of position is necessary, help with that. Also, if you are around any chemicals or smoke, remove the person from the vicinity and away from the source.

Step 5

Remain calm. Stress triggers or worsens asthma attacks, so staying level-.ed is absolutely necessary.

Step 6

Call an ambulance if the situation has not significantly improved in 10 minutes. Regardless of what the person says or wants, an EMT can best help them at this point. A medical professional's advice is warranted after this length of time.

Maybe all this lady needed were people that were aware or familiar with her illness. You should never be an EMT. You can't get fired for simply being there to support them, no one expects them to whip out their personal stash of drugs and shove them down someones throat.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by Miraj
 


Nothing would have got them fired. I guarantee that. I work for the State Government, and it is extremely difficult to get fired. It is also extremely bad PR to be in any type of uniform and walk away from a situation. Their job was not an issue.

As for there being nothing they could do. Some people are born leaders and are good in an emergency, and others are not. That is a fact. However, if they were 911 operators/EMT/Paramedic or any other type of stress related job, then we can assume they know how to take charge of a situation and provide some organization and action.

If you are soon to be an EMT / Paramedic / or Football Coach, please be advised that you will be looked to for action. I have often been pulled into situations just because I was wearing a Tie! I didn't say, "Sorry not my area of expertise." Instead I assessed the situation, took an appraisal of my resources, gave a couple of suggestions/orders, and then sat by and provided calm leadership until the professionals arrived. It is not that hard. If you wear a uniform, or if you choose a job that puts you in a leadership role, or even the impression of a leadership role, then it is your duty to fulfill that role until someone more qualified arrives.

Also, that last sentence in that paragraph is part of FEMA training. The most qualified person on site is in charge until a more qualified person shows up. Maybe a 911 operator is ordering around a Mayor, or maybe an avid hiker is giving orders to a surgeon or a Senator. In each emergency situation, the person with the most experience and skill at handling that situation is charged with being the leader until the situation is stabilized or more qualified folks arrive.

It is just not that hard to take some action. Any action. As an EMT, you will learn that Comfort and Calm go a long way in keeping someone alive a little longer.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by mothershipzeta
 


You are twisting their meaning. No you can't go around giving people their karma, it has to be random and unsolicited, but it could be given by someone seeking revenge as that is a consequence from his actions and that is clearly not the same thing. No, that poster isn't wholly correct either as it doesn't just dump you when you reach zero or whatever.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by ALlENATlON
 


God people are wonderful in their assumptions. Thanks for judging my character because I defended a man who got shot over something he shouldn't have.

Like I said, it's not something I would have EVER done myself. But I seem to be the only one defending this guy. Just like ATS, Jump to conclusions before you know everything.

I don't think he did the right thing, I just don't think he did the "wrong" thing either.

But I'm sure most of the people on these boards would be RUNNING from this sort of situation.

And your wrong, in this situation given how severe I would of had 911 called before I did anything else.

Of course, if you want a verbatum repeat of what EMTs are trained to do, I can give you that too.

I know what I can do in this situation, and it's not a solution much better than the EMT in this situation.. But I would never walk away.



[edit on 19-7-2010 by Miraj]

[edit on 19-7-2010 by Miraj]



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by Miraj
 





Like I said, it's not something I would have EVER done myself. But I seem to be the only one defending this guy. Just like ATS, Jump to conclusions before you know everything.


Exactly. That statement makes you unqualified for the position you are seeking out! Please find some other profession! Preferably one with very little responsibility.

If helping this woman in the slightest way is not something you would normally do, then you do not need to be in Public Service such as an EMT, and you do not need to be any leadership.

Maybe a Taxi Driver? How are your driving skills? Maybe an Accountant? Not much personal contact and only monetary responsibilities, no physical ones.

Please, please, please rethink your career choice if you see any justification for not stepping into this situation and doing something.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by Miraj
 


Wait....what assumption did I jump to?

Saying you shouldn't be an EMT isn't based on assumption, that is just my opinion based on your statements. Seriously, you shouldn't.

[edit on 19-7-2010 by ALlENATlON]



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:27 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Cool down and read the context of my posts.

I was stating I would NEVER walk away.

I would of done everything I could have, but it's more important to call 911 than some un equipped EMT saying "Ok.. lets get you to a comfortable position."



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by ALlENATlON
 



Maybe all this lady needed were people that were aware or familiar with her illness. You should never be an EMT. You can't get fired for simply being there to support them, no one expects them to whip out their personal stash of drugs and shove them down someones throat.


That, where you judged me as being unfit to be an EMT because I called BS on people praising an EMT getting murdered.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:31 PM
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reply to post by Keyhole
 


They were 911 dispatchers I thought.

Which they are EMTs, but they aren't. They don't work in the field, they answer 911 calls.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by Miraj
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


But since Im soon to be an EMT.. I know that there's nothing that I could do.

Anything they could do would have got them fired, and likely would not help.



This clearly implies you would do nothing!!! Hey....taxi driver! There you go!



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by Miraj
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Cool down and read the context of my posts.

I was stating I would NEVER walk away.

I would of done everything I could have, but it's more important to call 911 than some un equipped EMT saying "Ok.. lets get you to a comfortable position."


I apologize. I read it as "helping" her was not something you would have ever done, instead of how you meant it which was "walking away" was not something you would have ever done. My apologies.


And I agree with calling 911 as being at the top of the priority list. Although I think I would ask someone else to do the calling while I assisted the lady, unless there was a real EMT in the area, such as the ones that walked away. Then my priority would have been jerking them back to the scene while I dialed 911 and asked people for inhalers.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by Miraj
 



You go around and start intubating people off the job (Stupid example I know) and you'll be gone before your next shift starts. Guarantee'd


You can still render BLS (Basic Life Support) care till help arrives.

Seriously if your in EMS you should know this!

Talk about intubation shows you have no reason to be in health care if you think that justification is sound. Why would one carry a laryngoscope and endotracheal tubes while off duty in the first place??



Good Samaritan Laws state no one will, or can be charged in helping when in off duty situations. All you need to do is render BLS care and wait for the paramedics to arrive.

Compassion is a good value to have.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by Miraj
 


My opinion...

my opinion.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by mothershipzeta
 


Fact: This man is an EMT therefore a medical professional who's sole purpose is to save lives as medical emergencies arise.

Fact: This EMT let a pregnant woman and her unborn child die because he was on a coffee break.

No we don't know the circumstances of the occurrence. We don't know what transpired with the shooter or what the motive was. Personally I think it is a case of good ol' fashioned vigilante justice but that's just what I think. After all the news of this did spread and some names (namely said EMT) where thrown out there.

All someone had to do was be just pissed enough. Again this is conjecture and as you previously state irrelevant in a court of law. However, this didn't transpire in a court of law did it?


[edit on 19-7-2010 by DaMod]



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by ALlENATlON
 


Remember what I said you jumped to conclusions?

I meant that; I could get her into a comfortable position, support her emotionally. Maybe if I had an ambulance I could give her some oxygen, ect.. But there's nothing I could do to suddenly take her asthma attack away.


She probably did not have an inhaler, or she would have used it. (People with asthma tend to be more familiar with their condition.)



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by Miraj
 


You don't have any Albuterol sulfate in an ambulance?

Really?



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by theability
 


I was making a stupid example..

Basically what were told in training is.. Nothing above basic CPR/AED and basic first aid if we're off the job.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:36 PM
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Originally posted by SmokeJaguar67
reply to post by mf_luder
 



Originally posted by mf_luder
I for one am glad he's dead.


Really or just spilt words? I hope for the latter!


Originally posted by mf_luder
Karma - she'll get you.


So true and when you get to understand the real idea behind karma you no longer take a glad heart in another persons demise too.

"You may believe that you are responsible for what you do, but not for what you think. The truth is that you are responsible for what you think, because it is only at this level that you can exercise choice. What you do comes from what you think." ~ anon


[edit on 19-7-2010 by SmokeJaguar67]


While I agree, I have to say, being responsible for what you think is half true. You can't help certain thoughts that pop into your .. It's how you react to those thoughts, either ignoring or entertaining them that any choice is made.




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