It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Horton Plains slender loris pictured after it was thought to be extinct

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:31 AM
link   
Here is news of a little creature who has only been seen a handful of time in the last 60 years or so.

Scientists had thought they were extinct, but have now managed to take a photograph of one of them:

Male - about 8" long:


www.dailymail.co.uk...



One of the rarest primates in the world, which was so elusive it was thought to have become extinct, has been caught on camera for the first time, researchers said today.
The Horton Plains slender loris had only been seen four times since 1937 and vanished between 1939 and 2002, leading scientists to believe the wide-eyed mammal had become extinct.
Researchers from the Zoological Society of London's (ZSL) edge of existence programme, who spent more than 200 hours looking for signs of the nocturnal primate in the mountain forest of central Sri Lanka, said they were 'thrilled' to have photographed it.



One of the rarest primates in the world, which was so elusive it was thought to have become extinct, has been caught on camera for the first time, researchers said today.
The Horton Plains slender loris had only been seen four times since 1937 and vanished between 1939 and 2002, leading scientists to believe the wide-eyed mammal had become extinct.
Researchers from the Zoological Society of London's (ZSL) edge of existence programme, who spent more than 200 hours looking for signs of the nocturnal primate in the mountain forest of central Sri Lanka, said they were 'thrilled' to have photographed it.


Another article here:

www.telegraph.co.uk...


Experts believe the prime reason for its rarity was due to the loss of its natural forest habitat largely destroyed by the drive to create tea plantations.


I feel so guilty - I live on tea. I avoid soya products because so much of the rain forest is being used up to grow it and now I find that my tea-drinking habit is depriving these little creatures (they're 6 - 10 inches long) of their habitat


Little bit more information here:
news.mongabay.com...


A subspecies of the red slender loris (Loris tardigradus , the Horton plains slender loris is classified by the IUCN Red List as Endangered. The species is threatened by habitat loss, as well as hunting. Researchers recommend that fragmented forests need to be reconnected in order for Sri Lanka's lorises to avoid extinction. EDGE, which is currently focusing on the species, has placed the red slender loris number 22 in terms of endangerment and evolutionary distinctness for the world's mammals.



General info on lorises:
en.wikipedia.org...

[edit on 19-7-2010 by berenike]




posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 05:49 AM
link   
I drink quite a bit of tea also. It's great to know I am helping kill off these poor suckers.

SIGH.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 05:53 AM
link   
Poor little bug eyed thing. Now that they've found it, someone is going to want to deep fry one to see what it tastes like.
Either that, or they will say it has red eyes, so it must be evil, and therefore it must be destroyed.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 07:00 AM
link   
LETS KILL IT!!!!

GOD DAMN TREE HUGGERS!!! I'M SICK OF THEM!!!

Naw i'm only kidding ;-P

Glad it's back from extinction. Makes me wonder how many others are on the Extinct list but are really only very very endangered ;-P



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 07:50 AM
link   
I was a bit worried to hear that the scientists got hold of three of them, but apparently it was only to measure them.

It would be great if something really could be done to start linking up the patches of forest to make a better environment for the wildlife.

I read somewhere, when I was looking for related articles, that there was some concern about people wanting lorises as pets. I can see the appeal, but hope they don't go the same way as hamsters and gerbils who make wonderful little pets but need a lot of watching if you're going to give them some freedom around the home.

I'd definitely not want to see lorises put at the mercy of children as their first pet. It might be a way to teach the kids some responsibility, but not good for the poor benighted creature.



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 02:40 PM
link   
what do they eat and can i adopt two of them?


hes sooooooooooo cute .



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 03:32 PM
link   
reply to post by alysha.angel
 


Some lorises are entirely insectivorous and others supplement their diet with fruit, leaves and slugs.


Don't think I'll be coming back as a loris



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 04:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by berenike
reply to post by alysha.angel
 


Some lorises are entirely insectivorous and others supplement their diet with fruit, leaves and slugs.


Don't think I'll be coming back as a loris



good, then he and she will thrive in my yard, got tons of slugs, snails and bugs .




top topics



 
4

log in

join