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The Origin of Species

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posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 01:17 PM
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Published on November 24, 1859 On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life is widely considered to be the work that created the theory of evolution. At the time Darwin's theory was hotly contested as it went against the natural theology that dominated science at the time. While the book was widely read at the time of its release, it took twenty years before Darwin's theory was fully accepted. It then took until the 1930s before its significance was truly appreciated when it became a major pillar of the modern evolutionary synthesis.

Seeing as how this board is dominated by the evolutionists vs. creationists debate I felt it was time we discussed the origin of evolution. I see many false claims and misrepresentations made in these debates, so I figured it was about time that a poll was taken on who has actually read Darwin's masterpiece and what your opinion of the work is.




posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 01:47 PM
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I read it, but it's been awhile
I've read so many others since, so there's a good chance I have a little confusion on what was in which book


Well... now I have an excuse to read it again



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 01:57 PM
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reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


Admittedly I've never read it, but that's because when I started looking into evolution I realized the best evidence for it is in genetics, and DNA wasn't discovered until Darwin was long gone. I probably will read it at some future point, just to get inside his head, I can't imagine how hard it was for him facing opposition at every turn. Even now his theory is opposed by some but I imagine it was a hundred times worse in his lifetime.



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 02:31 PM
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Originally posted by Titen-Sxull
reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


Admittedly I've never read it, but that's because when I started looking into evolution I realized the best evidence for it is in genetics, and DNA wasn't discovered until Darwin was long gone. I probably will read it at some future point, just to get inside his head, I can't imagine how hard it was for him facing opposition at every turn. Even now his theory is opposed by some but I imagine it was a hundred times worse in his lifetime.


He left it alone for I believe decades, it wasn't till the much later part of his life (I believe around his last few years) that he published it. By no means was it rushed. Pretty much pissed off people in the same science as when Einstein denounced christianity.
Hate mail comes from everyone!



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 03:05 PM
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Here's some interesting lectures by professor Walter Veith on the subject , apparently he used to teach evolution in university's in South Africa , if you watch the series you'll see why he came to the conclusion that the theory of evolution is more of a theory and doesn't really have the scientific proof to back it up . He makes some compelling points as to why creation theory makes more sense . I admit I it's been a few years since I watched it but interesting never the less .


And no sorry I haven't read old Charles "master piece"



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 03:13 PM
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I've read half of it (Library wanted the book back before i finished), but I gave my girlfriend an illustrated edition of it as a christmas present, and when she finishes is, I'll read it again.

But since some of it is mildly outdated and some speculations are wrong, I really only consider it to be a book of historical interest..
I'm an educated biologist by the way, with a masters in genetics, just to put my view into context.. I've already had my share of evolutionary courses.

Although, some concepts are *really* well described in the book, so for people that don't know anything evolution, it is actually a good read IMHO, in order to learn about some of the basics. I would still recommend a modern book on evolution of course, if one really wants to learn about the process.

[edit on 18/7/10 by Thain Esh Kelch]



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 04:42 PM
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I've read part of it. To be honest, it's extremely boring. Luckily, it's not necessary for learning evolutionary theory. Though if you're interested in the history of evolutionary theory, then it's a must read.



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


I have read it and the main problem that Darwin had was that he could not explain how genes were passed on; which was why it so long for it to be widely accepted. Darwin believed that genes were blended together from mother and father; however, at the same time Darwin was making this claim another person by the name of Mendel was testing pea plants and studying how there genes were passed on to the offspring. Mendel discovered that genes were either heterozygous or homozygous (Dominant or Recessive). The two never knew of each others works and it was only later that when Mendel's works were applied to Darwin's book that it was found out that the same applies for Natural Selection. Darwin had most of his ducks in a row and was right about many processes, but he was also wrong about a few things as well, like blending of the genes. Darwin's book also did not cover evolution he covered natural selection a process used to make evolution occur.

Overall it was a great book, but one has to do research in order to see what he got wrong and what he got right. Darwin also observed more of genetic drift in some instances where he says divergence of species. Especially with some of the birds becoming stuck on certain lands. But then again, genetic drift was not even known about that long ago.



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 


It's actually possible that Darwin did read Mendel's work. When Darwin died he had a copy of the journal Mendel's work was in on his desk. As for this topic, I agree that Darwin is outdated, but since I see so much disinformation posted about him and evolution in general I figured I'd see how many of the people making these claims had actually done some research into evolution.



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 06:43 PM
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reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


That is true; however, at the time of writing his book Darwin and Mendel did not know of each other. At the end of there lives the two had known about each other, or at least I am positive that Mendel knew of Darwin. I do know for a fact that Darwin knew of Mendel. Virtually two scientist at the same time holding a piece of the others puzzle..lol.. And i understand why you made the thread and it was actually a great idea. A lot of people have not read it, but as posted above the reason why is because it is really boring.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 02:49 AM
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I've read it.

Some may find it boring -- and certain chapters, especially towards the middle of the book, certainly are -- but the intellectual pleasure of watching one of history's greatest minds at work is, to me at least, enthralling.

The Voyage of the Beagle is more fun to read, though.



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 03:19 AM
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Originally posted by Astyanax
I've read it.

Some may find it boring -- and certain chapters, especially towards the middle of the book, certainly are -- but the intellectual pleasure of watching one of history's greatest minds at work is, to me at least, enthralling.

The Voyage of the Beagle is more fun to read, though.

Funny, I find On The Origin Of Species to be must more interesting. Voyage of the Beagle is more of a relaxing book.. Something you read when you need to relax.. Its sooo soothing to read.. ^^



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