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Matt Simmons says BP covering up MASSIVE HOLE miles away

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posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by rufusdrak
 


I beg to differ that answer and here is why. This from wikipedia should do.

The MIR submersibles can dive to a maximum depth of 6,000 metres (19,685 ft). This makes them two of only seven manned submersibles in the world that can dive beyond 3,000 metres (9,843 ft), the others being the US submersibles Alvin, Sea Cliff and Deepstar 20000, the Japanese owned Shinkai and the French owned Nautile. Up to 98% of the world’s oceans are under 6,000 metres deep. All these deep-ocean submersibles utilize three-person crews

So I guess that you may want to revise that answer just a little bit my friend. This shows that 19,000 feet is a little deeper than this well is at.




posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by CREAM
 
thank you i knew there was one or two, some times i look to hard when asking works just as good, please post/ find more! I would like to see if there are from the gulf, i have lost faith in msm, not with out doing some checking first. i do think this is part of something bigger.



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by CREAM
 


About that video , the viking poseidon does not appear to have been deployed to the gulf?It does not appear on the bp rov list at all? Can any one enlighten me , as it is I think this is a hoax vid tbh



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by rufusdrak
 


Not quite sure where you are getting your info: but here are two links.

www.ussubmarines.com...

www.angelfire.com...

PS. Ive wanted the Nomad 1000 for years, and if I ever win the lottery it will be my first purchase.



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 01:38 PM
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Originally posted by tsurfer2000h
reply to post by rufusdrak
 


I beg to differ that answer and here is why. This from wikipedia should do.

The MIR submersibles can dive to a maximum depth of 6,000 metres (19,685 ft). This makes them two of only seven manned submersibles in the world that can dive beyond 3,000 metres (9,843 ft), the others being the US submersibles Alvin, Sea Cliff and Deepstar 20000, the Japanese owned Shinkai and the French owned Nautile. Up to 98% of the world’s oceans are under 6,000 metres deep. All these deep-ocean submersibles utilize three-person crews

So I guess that you may want to revise that answer just a little bit my friend. This shows that 19,000 feet is a little deeper than this well is at.


Those arent military submarines though , they are submersibles ....which was the point?



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 01:47 PM
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What?? I hope you don't mean U.S. Navy submarines as they can't go much lower than 1000 feet. This whole Oil thing is taking place at 5000-6000feet. No military submarine can go that far not even the Russian ones which have the world record for deepest drives

US NAVY DSV's 4500 to 6500 METERS DEPTH But Not The BIG Boats

Deep Submergence VehicleDeep Submergence Vehicle


A Deep Submergence Vehicle (DSV) is a deep diving manned submarines that is self-propelled. The term DSV is generally one used by the United States Navy, though several navies operate vehicles that can be accurately described as DSVs. DSVs are commonly divided into two types: research DSVs, which are used for exploration and surveying, and DSRVs (Deep Submergence Rescue Vehicle), which can be used for rescuing the crew of a sunken submarine and/or clandestine (espionage) missions (primarily installing wiretaps on undersea cables). DSRV type vessels are equipped with docking chambers to allow personnel ingress/egress via a manhole.

The real-life feasibility of any DSRV-based rescue attempt is hotly debated, because the few available docking chambers of a stricken submarine may be flooded, trapping the sailors still alive in other dry compartments. Because of these difficulties, the use of integrated crew escape capsules and/or detachable conning tower has gained favour in military submarine design during the last two decades and most DSRV are now primarily relegated to clandestine missions and undersea military equipment maintenance, if at all. The rapid development of safe, cost-saving ROV technology has also rendered some DSV vessels obsolete.

Strictly speaking bathyscaphes are not submarines because they have minimal mobility and are built like a balloon, using a habitable spherical pressure vessel hung under a liquid hydrocarbon filled float drum. In a DSV/DSRV type vehicle the passenger compartment and the ballast tank functionality is incorporated into a single structure to afford more habitable space (up to 24 people in the case of a DSRV rescue vehicle).

Most DSV/DSRV vehicles are powered by traditional electric battery propulsion and have very limited endurance. Plans have been made to equip DSVs with closed circuit internal combustion powerplants (LOX Stirling engines) but none have been realized so far, due to cost and maintenance considerations. All DSV vehicles are dependent upon a surface support ship or a mother submarine, that can piggyback or tow them (in case of the NR-1) to the scene of operations. Some DSRV vessels are air transportable in very large military cargo planes to speed up deployment in case of emergency rescue missions.

List of Deep Submergence Vehicles
Trieste class bathyscaphe

* FNRS-2 - the predecessor to Trieste
* DSV-0 Trieste — the X-1 Trieste bathyscaphe has reached Challenger Deep, the world's deepest seabed. It was retired in 1966.[1]
* DSV-1 X-2 Trieste II — an updated bathyscathe (or bathyscaph) design, participated in clandestine missions, it was retired in 1984.[2][3]
* Bathyscaphe Archimede — French-made bathyscaphe, operated around the time of the Trieste.

Alvin class submarine

Alvin, owned by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) is operated under agreement by the National Deep Submergence Facility at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), where it conducts science oriented missions funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and ONR. Alvin has a maximum depth capability of 4500 meters and operates from R/V Atlantis, an AGOR-23 class vessel owned by the ONR and operated by WHOI under a charter party agreement. The NSF has committed to the construction of a replacement sub with enhanced capabilities and 6500 meter depth capability to replace Alvin, which will be retired upon its completion.

* DSV-2 Alvin — a deep diving



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by gambon
 


Ok then there is also this that I found.This is from wiki answers and here is a link if you want to see for yourself.

The United States Navy bathyscaphe Trieste reached the bottom at 1:06 p.m. on January 23, 1960, with U.S. Navy Lieutenant Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard on board.

The onboard systems indicated a depth of 11,521 meters (37,799 ft), but this was later revised to 10,916 meters (35,813 ft).

wiki.answers.com...

The US Navy does have a sub that can go that deep.

[edit on 16-7-2010 by tsurfer2000h]



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by tsurfer2000h
 


its a scientific submersible device not a military submarine ....



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by tsurfer2000h
 


Thank you for your very kind comments and sorry about posting the same DSV data you presented before me. Great work!

Best Regards,
t



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by gambon
 


Gee, made by the Navy, with a Navy commander on board. Hmm. No you're right not military! I will side with your hard headed ignorant opinion, stomp the floor and scream, "Not military, Not Military" over and over again!" I'm with you brother! A tantrum will always overide facts. (well, at least sometimes).



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 01:59 PM
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Originally posted by gambon
reply to post by tsurfer2000h
 


its a scientific submersible device not a military submarine ....



Yes, You are 100% correct.

But, the point was to have a vehicle search for issues on the seabed.

Does it really matter which type of underwater vehicle is used?



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 02:00 PM
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The Viking Poseidon is down there closing in on 5,750 feet down. The feeds are here.



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 02:02 PM
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reply to post by gambon
 


So a submersible is not a submarine. So a submarine goes under water travels under water and does work under water, but a submersible goes under water travels under water does work underwater and is actually a personal submarine. I must be missing something here, because a submersible and a submarine semmingly do the same thing except one is bigger than the other.



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by nite owl
ALL that pressure, i wonder what caused the massive hole? earthquake, due to the drilling in an area of tectonic activities. I wonder, this hole. It has got to be getting bigger and bigger because of the pressure of it and it bringing up sand , rocks and junk down there and that only wears on the sides of the hole and makes the hole bigger. They cannot just cement this hole because it has no pipe to grab onto , all it has is loose dirt and rocks. How come they will not say what caused this? HOW DID THIS HAPPEN? THIS only raises even more questions.
OH MY GOD, WHAT DID YOU DO BP? AND THEN ONE THIRD OF THE OCEANS TURNED RED. OOHHHHH.

[edit on 15-7-2010 by nite owl]

I hope you are wrong..........but the bible has hit every prediction so far.......hum what to believe. God I hope we have not sealed the well and sealed our fate. I fear that the thing will explode and the sea floor give way, and a much bigger hole; not pluggable at all will ensure........and the whole gulf be spoiled.........Is the atlantic 1/3 of the ocean........cuz that is how the water travels from the gulf to the atlantic across........wow what if the methane blows...we have been covering it up with the corexit.or rather binding it wth the corexit.......so as not to cause alarm, all the while killing every wild thing there.........maybe its mans turn to die



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 02:03 PM
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What if the supposed hole that is miles away was actually their first accident and it was too big to do anything about, so they staged the deep horizon accident and allow it to spew on camera for days-on-end? The spewing will coverup the original spill, and the whole world will see them dilligently trying to cap the well?
That'd be like a doctor accidently cut into a man's femoral artery and couldn't stop the flow, so he cut a deep gouge in the ankle while nobody was looking and treated that wound instead.



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by EyeHeartBigfoot
 


Your welcome, do not worry about the post it will never change the minds of those who want to be right and do not like to hear the truth.



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by primus2012
 


Ha that is a reasonable thought. what if...........either way we are screwed. in medicine some infections are cleaned and allowed to heal without stitches so they heal from the inside out........I have a feeling we have caused a massive infection inside with the plugging........and shes a gonna blow.......I hope not but the thought is pervasive. The bible thing about the 1/3 of the seas red.........uh oh, makes me think of the "simpsons" show where homer goes, "douh........!"
just after he screws up..........



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 02:08 PM
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reply to post by primus2012
 


Fascinating theory, P.S. Love the Floyd avatar.



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 02:11 PM
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Ok the thing about submarines vs submersibles.......submarines are not tethered. I think submersibles are tethered to lines for communications, safety and life life support, I think. One is a deep sea dive bubble of sorts one is military and can move w/o cables. Plus, I bet the submersible is less combustable.....remember the methane levels in the waters,........a sub may cause explosion risk......vs the submersable.........let down via cables. What says the board.?



posted on Jul, 16 2010 @ 02:12 PM
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reply to post by primus2012
 



You know that does sound a little crazy, but it is something that could be plausible in some way. I will not put nothing past BP and the way things have been going with this whole situation you never know. I could see a shady doctor doing that to cover his rear. It has probably happened at least once.



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