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The MOHO; Has BP drilled into it?

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posted on Jul, 17 2010 @ 01:12 AM
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Okay, I think I found an important connection!

In my original posts, I provided a link to the IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program). Here is that LINK again.

I just found an article titled "New Engineering Initiative Strives to Meet Mohole Objectives ". Here is a excerpt:


With AGR Drilling Services’ support, IODP led an engineering effort to adapt existing technology to drill very deep holes in very deep regions of the ocean,” says Engineering Manager Greg Myers. “Up to now, riserless mud recovery drilling was limited to shallower water depths. This ultra-deepwater drilling technology allows scientists to investigate subseafloor areas in great depths, where oceanic crust may be thinner—such as in waters off Hawaii.” According to Myers, an ultra-deepwater RMR™ system could be implemented as early as July 2011.


LINK to article.


NOW....I was curious if there was a connection between AGR Drilling services (the co. that created the equipment capable of reaching the MOHO) and BP. As with so many other facets of my research, the results stunned me. I found a brief article titled "AGR successfully trials RMR system" This is from October, 2008. Check this out!


BERGEN, Norway -- AGR Drilling Services, Shell, BP, and the Norwegian Research Council have undertaken a successful field trial of the deepwater riserless mud recovery (RMR) system at 1,500 m (4,921 ft) water depth. The new deepwater RMR system was deployed from the semisubmersible Atwood Falcon in Sabah, Malaysia in September 2008 and used during a live drilling operation for Sabah Shell Petroleum.

The RMR system returns drilling mud and cuttings from the seabed to the rig while drilling the top-hole section of the well, prior to installation of the riser. Top hole drilling conventionally discharges drilling fluid and cuttings onto the seafloor. AGR's RMR technology collects the mud at the seabed and pumps it back to the drilling vessel where it is cleaned and reused. This technology allows the driller to use engineered mud systems in the top-hole section.



LINK to article

So there it is, one more thing to make me wonder even more.

[edit on 17-7-2010 by westcoast]




posted on Jul, 17 2010 @ 04:44 AM
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Originally posted by westcoast
reply to post by PuterMan
 


As far as abiotic hydrocarbon, what about Serpentinization? I know it is just a theory, which means there are just as many people that believe as don't.


Yes this is interesting, if it is correct, as it provides a source for the methane and for abiotic oil production, however it is still necessary for there to be a containment in fractured/porous rock strata for oil to collect and as I said I do not think that the MOHO layer would provide this as the rock is too hot and viscous and therefore not likely to be fractured (or porous).

This does not mean that abiotic oil cannot exist, merely that it must higher than the MOHO layer. In that respect there is of course a distinct possibility that they hit abiotic oil (if that exists). It would explain quite a lot.

Since the original question was 'have they drilled into the MOHO' I had answered that, rather than looking at possibilities for the source of the oil. This is a fascinating subject and one to which I have intentions of devoting further time.

By the way to the poster who asked how they can know about layers lower than they have drilled, most of this is determined by a seismographic process. They let off explosions and then trace the resulting waves on seismographs. The length of time the waves take to travel through layers (velocity) gives them an indication of the density, and thus make-up, of the material. The process of tomography (seismic modelling) is used for many things but a particular example of modelling would be the plumes under Yellowstone and Iceland. You can sort of think of it like X-raying the earth.



posted on Jul, 17 2010 @ 04:52 AM
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Just a quick link here to the possibility of abiotic oil.

Something mysterious is going on at Eugene Island 330 1999 article

Edit to correct Speeling Errar

[edit on 17/7/2010 by PuterMan]



posted on Jul, 17 2010 @ 12:14 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


Okay, I have to go to work (darn!) but I have to jump on here real quick.

This is why I love tossing ideas around here on ATS. It leads to greater knowledge and understanding. I had never even known about all of this stuff a few days ago.

I think I understand what you are saying now, and it makes sense. You are saying this serpentization process could exist, but you think that it must have to extend from the MOHO and into the upper layers if we were to tap into it, given the heat and velocity of the MOHO? So (conjecture here still ofcourse) let's say if this well had drilled down into the basement layer and hit this 'river' of abiotic hydrocarbon flowing up from the MOHO? This could explain the color/chemical make-up/heat/PSI of this oil...possibly.

While I still think it possible for them to have gotten into the MOHO, given that we just don't know for sure what is in there...I agree with you that it is more likely they have drilled into the basement layer (one above the MOHO).

Great article you linke, BTW. I have only skimmed the first part...will read the rest later tonight. But I want to highlight this comment:


Conventional wisdom says the world's supply of oil is finite, and that it was deposited in horizontal reservoirs near the surface in a process that took millions of years. Since the economies of entire countries ride on the fundamental notion that oil reserves are exhaustible, any contrary evidence "would change the way people see the game, turn the world view upside down," says Daniel Yergin, a petroleum futurist and industry consultant in Cambridge, Mass. "Oil and renewable resource are not words that often appear in the same sentence."


So according to this article, it is already suspected that abiotic (or young) oil exsists in the gulf...giving more credence to the theory that it may be what BP is dealing with.

I look forward to more input!!!



posted on Jul, 17 2010 @ 11:03 PM
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I cover a lot of geographical ground (no pun intended) and I think this might be what ties in what a lot of people are worried about with the BP disaster. This is important so check it out!

reply to post by westcoast


You really pulled up a lot of research!

I think you may have connected the dots to something larger than anticipated.

I have taken geology courses in college and the athenosphere is semi solid due to the vast amount of pressure exerted upon it. The Moho would be under similar pressures, and if you release that pressure, the semi fluid structure turns to liquid and would flow out the hole.

Now it is believed that would produce mafic (magnesium/iron rich) magma, not mafic hydrocarbons. HOWEVER, any fluid under enough pressure despite temperature will take on solid properties. More pressure, less molecular movement, the more solid it becomes.

If someone or a company pops the cork so to speak, then all that semi solid mass will liquify and flow to the point of least resistance. I.e. the well head, and any fracture points along the way. Not to mention this stuff is supposed to be a super heated, mineral rich fluid so you now have heat and friction acting constantly on the well shaft which should erode it considerably under these uncontrolled circumstances.

Regardless of fractures, if enough pressure is exerted on a weakened shaft, the doomsday fears of a blowout may occur regardless of maintaining the 8000 psi desired.

Now, if it is already leaking, which some believe (I can't confirm that, but I did see a rock or two with what looked like seepage), this possible Moho fluid (toxic oil) could be filling pockets of strata and in turn could be eroding the underlying structure of the seabed.

Oceanic crust is more dense, cold, heavier, and brittle than continental crust, and if you start messing with its underlying structure, it could exacerbate cracking and the now fluid Moho/oil could eventually force its way to the surface causing structural collapse of the sea bed releasing further pressure and allowing leaks to spread quite some distance from the original drill site and releasing more pressure, liquifying even more Moho substrata.

Then it goes right into the Gulf and we have a situation that can't be corrected. As to speculation of a tidal wave from a large piece of oceanic crust dropping? I can't be certain, but despite the doomsday scenarios we really could be facing massive changes in sea floor structure depending on how bad this situation really is.


[edit on 16-7-2010 by GideonHM]



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 12:17 AM
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You might find this interesting as in indirectly links the MOHO to the GOM via ocean ridges / rift zones:
www.aapg.org...

I would assume that in areas of spreading the MOHO would be closer to the ocean floor. My reasoning behind this is material must be moving upwards to fill the rift and would likely be deforming that layer upwards.

You may also find interesting doing a search regarding the subduction of the Farallon techtonic plate beneath the North American plate and how it is theorized it is influencing the New Madrid fault zone and the Caribbean.
culturelifesciencenews.blogspot.com...


Other information that may tickle your senses:
www.showme.net...



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 12:24 AM
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reply to post by abecedarian
 


I'll be sure to read through this material as soon as I have a chance to tonight. But to answer your one question, I have read in several different papers that the MOHO IS closer to the surface at rifts/etc., anyplace there has been any kind of 'uplift'.



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 03:52 PM
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So I'm curious to find out if anyone else located any further info to support or deny this?

I still think that abiotic hrydrocarbons would explain a lot, as far as how everyone is acting regarding this gusher!



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 10:59 PM
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I hate to post real fast without being able to give a lengthy articulation of why I like this thread, but...

Between looking at the geography of the gulf floor in conjunction with the chicxulub impact, I think its completely feasible that we have poked into a unique spot on earth.

There are Domes named on the floor of the gulf...

These Domes are on the edge of changes in underwater terrain that were likely formed by a relatively recent traumatic impact event...

BP was drilling right around these domes...

Add the fact that corporations pay scientists way more than governments and humanitarian agencies do...it just stands to reason that if this information has even been examined or discovered, its likely been under a grant from BP or The Minerals Mining Services.

I hope you see where I am going with my train of thought, and why it will be very hard to find supporting data on this issue.

I wish I could make sure that this makes enough sense and likely expunge on it, but its late for me and I got an early day tomorrow.

I will definitely continue on this path and see if I can find any support to this theory.

Good thread as far as I am concerned.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 02:17 AM
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reply to post by XKrossX
 


Thanks for your input. I completely see where you are going with it, I agree 100%. This is the kind of info that couldn't be allowed out. It would be worth trillions. We're talking the possibility of markets collapsing, etc.

I at first was confused as to why I wasn't able to find any recent professional articles linking this all....then I remembered something about BP buying search rights on Google; something crazy like that. It occured to me that just because I haven't found it, doesn't mean it doesn't exist. I just think that any kind of mapping, scientific papers, reports, etc. couldn't and wouldn't be allowed to be seen by the media.

Abiotic hydrocarbon is what I think of as the oil industries biggest payoff and worst nightmare. It could make them richer than most countries, but also bring them down if the secret were to get out. The last article Puterman linked says something about the oil fields in Saudi Arabia. That it is suspected it may be replenishing itself....so perhaps that would lend even more credence as to why we STILL have such a military presence there.

You see.....this is about more, way more than the environment, if this is what they have. THAT is why it would explain (for me) why our own government is acting so bizarre about it. Why they wouldn't allow any foreign countries in to help..the no fly zones, the media blackouts.

I'm still not saying that I believe this, it is all obviously just a theory. But I have to admit that I think it is the most credible. It would explain so much.



posted on Mar, 27 2011 @ 01:26 AM
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I've tried to assess the makeup of this well and the pressures and so forth, and I believe that actual depth of the well is somewhere around 30,000-37,000 feet. So they actually drilled it at a depth about double of what they are claiming they drilled it at.
edit on 27-3-2011 by Red Cloak because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by Red Cloak
 


It just never seemed to add up to me. Now, I know absolutely nothing about drilling an oil well, other than what I read about during the spill....but it seemed that the amount of pressure involved in this and the way the leak was acting had a bunch of scientists stumped. If you have a chance to read back through some of the earlier posts, there is some good debate regarding the pros and cons of the theory.

I still think it plausible.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 03:42 PM
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Originally posted by westcoast
reply to post by PuterMan
 


Okay, I have to go to work (darn!) but I have to jump on here real quick.

This is why I love tossing ideas around here on ATS. It leads to greater knowledge and understanding. I had never even known about all of this stuff a few days ago.

I think I understand what you are saying now, and it makes sense. You are saying this serpentization process could exist, but you think that it must have to extend from the MOHO and into the upper layers if we were to tap into it, given the heat and velocity of the MOHO? So (conjecture here still ofcourse) let's say if this well had drilled down into the basement layer and hit this 'river' of abiotic hydrocarbon flowing up from the MOHO? This could explain the color/chemical make-up/heat/PSI of this oil...possibly.

While I still think it possible for them to have gotten into the MOHO, given that we just don't know for sure what is in there...I agree with you that it is more likely they have drilled into the basement layer (one above the MOHO).

Great article you linke, BTW. I have only skimmed the first part...will read the rest later tonight. But I want to highlight this comment:


Conventional wisdom says the world's supply of oil is finite, and that it was deposited in horizontal reservoirs near the surface in a process that took millions of years. Since the economies of entire countries ride on the fundamental notion that oil reserves are exhaustible, any contrary evidence "would change the way people see the game, turn the world view upside down," says Daniel Yergin, a petroleum futurist and industry consultant in Cambridge, Mass. "Oil and renewable resource are not words that often appear in the same sentence."


So according to this article, it is already suspected that abiotic (or young) oil exsists in the gulf...giving more credence to the theory that it may be what BP is dealing with.

I look forward to more input!!!



Since it has been so long that any comments were made on this thread..I wanted to quote my last pertinent post. This kind of sums up where we (I) left off at.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 03:46 PM
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So in this theory we have the possiblity of a doomsday event for all sea faring creatures, and now all our problems with nuclear plants. Well i think things just keep getting better and better... I've read every post on this thread and to me this all makes sense and is plausible. Your theory, from what i understand, is quiet solid. Kudo's to all your research and the time you put into this.




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