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Bad credit score. Go to jail.

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posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:20 AM
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Will it ever be possible for the police to arrest you for owing a private institution like a bank, or a school, or a store like Wal-Mart the way they can arrest you for owing tax money to the government?




posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:23 AM
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Yep. Sure seems so. Look here...

[edit on 7/13/2010 by ~Lucidity]



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:28 AM
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Originally posted by president
Will it ever be possible for the police to arrest you for owing a private institution like a bank, or a school, or a store like Wal-Mart the way they can arrest you for owing tax money to the government?



The federal reserve is a corporation and if you don't pay the IRS, which is how the US pays the interest on the loan to the feds, then you go to jail.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:37 AM
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Originally posted by president
Will it ever be possible for the police to arrest you for owing a private institution like a bank, or a school, or a store like Wal-Mart the way they can arrest you for owing tax money to the government?


When you say school I am assuming a private school, or perhaps you mean school loans?

Either way:

In 1833 the United States abolished Federal imprisonment for unpaid debts,[4] and most states outlawed the practice around the same time.[5][6] Before then, the use of debtor's prisons was widespread; signatories to the Declaration of Independence, James Wilson & Robert Morris were both later incarcerated, as were 2,000 New Yorkers annually by 1816. Henry Lee III, better known as Light-Horse Harry Lee, a Revolutionary War general, former governor of Virginia, and father of Robert E. Lee, was imprisoned for debt between 1808 and 1809.[7] Sometimes, imprisonment would result from less than sixty-cents worth of debt.[8] It is still possible to be incarcerated for debt, though this may be unconstitutional unless the court finds that the debtor actually possesses the means to pay.[9][10] The constitutions of the U.S. states of Tennessee and Oklahoma forbid civil imprisonment for debts.[11]


en.wikipedia.org...'_prison

You can be tossed in the pookey if it is determined you could've paid but just refused. It's not something that happens. I don't see it happening in the near future either as there will simply be too many people in prisons and not enough room for them.

[edit on 13-7-2010 by antonia]



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