It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Top Ten ways they Track Us. Everyone should read this

page: 1
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 09:57 AM
link   
I found this on the internet makes for some rather shocking reading. Dont know how much of it a believe such as the last one about DNA storage in the UK but all the same makes for some really interesting reading. Feel free to add your thaughts. everyone should read this.

1. GPS -- Global positioning chips are now appearing in everything from U.S. passports, cell phones, to cars. More common uses include tracking employees, and for all forms of private investigation. Apple recently announced they are collecting the precise location of iPhone users via GPS for public viewing in addition to spying on users in other ways.

2. Internet -- Internet browsers are recording your every move forming detailed cookies on your activities. The NSA has been exposed as having cookies on their site that don't expire until 2035. Major search engines know where you surfed last summer, and online purchases are databased, supposedly for advertising and customer service uses. IP addresses are collected and even made public. Controversial websites can be flagged internally by government sites, as well as re-routing all traffic to block sites the government wants to censor. It has now been fully admitted that social networks provide NO privacy to users, while technologies for real-time social network monitoring are already being used. The Cyber security Act attempts to legalize the collection and exploitation of your personal information. Apple's iPhone also has browsing data recorded and stored. All of this despite the overwhelming opposition to cybersurveillance by citizens.

3. RFID -- Forget your credit cards which are meticulously tracked, or the membership cards for things so insignificant as movie rentals which require your SSN. Everyone has Costco, CVS, grocery-chain cards, and a wallet or purse full of many more. RFID "proximity cards" take tracking to a new level in uses ranging from loyalty cards, student ID, physical access, and computer network access. Latest developments include an RFID powder developed by Hitachi, for which the multitude of uses are endless -- perhaps including tracking hard currency so we can't even keep cash undetected.

4. Traffic cameras -- License plate recognition has been used to remotely automate duties of the traffic police in the United States, but have been proven to have dual use in England such as to mark activists under the Terrorism Act. Perhaps the most common use will be to raise money and shore up budget deficits via traffic violations, but uses may descend to such "Big Brother" tactics as monitors telling pedestrians not to litter as talking cameras already do in the UK.

5. Computer cameras and microphones -- The fact that laptops -- contributed by taxpayers -- spied on public school children (at home) is outrageous. Years ago Google began officially to use computer "audio fingerprinting" for advertising uses. They have admitted to working with the NSA, the premier surveillance network in the world. Private communications companies already have been exposed routing communications to the NSA. Now, keyword tools -- typed and spoken -- link to the global security matrix.
6. Public sound surveillance -- This technology has come a long way from only being able to detect gunshots in public areas, to now listening in to whispers for dangerous "keywords." This technology has been launched in Europe to "monitor conversations" to detect "verbal aggression" in public places. Sound Intelligence is the manufacturer of technology to analyze speech, and their website touts how it can easily be integrated into other systems.

7. Biometrics -- The most popular biometric authentication scheme employed for the last few years has been Iris Recognition. The main applications are entry control, ATMs and Government programs. Recently, network companies and governments have utilized biometric authentication including fingerprint analysis, iris recognition, voice recognition, or combinations of these for use in National identification cards.

8. DNA -- Blood from babies has been taken for all people under the age of 38. In England, DNA was sent to secret databases from routine heel prick tests. Several reports have revealed covert Pentagon databases of DNA for "terrorists" and now DNA from all American citizens is database. Digital DNA is now being used as well to combat hackers.

9. Microchips -- Microsoft's HealthVault and VeriMed partnership is to create RFID implantable microchips. Microchips for tracking our precious pets is becoming commonplace and serves to condition us to accept putting them in our children in the future. The FDA has already approved this technology for humans and is marketing it as a medical miracle, again for our safety.

10. Facial recognition -- Anonymity in public is over. Admittedly used at Obama's campaign events, sporting events, and most recently at the G8/G20 protests in Canada. This technology is also harvesting data from Facebook images and surely will be tied into the street "traffic" cameras.

Source: www.activistpost.com...




posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 10:31 AM
link   
well if all else fails and you want to get away from them watching you just . to rothbury. they'll never find you!



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 10:38 AM
link   
reply to post by danielhanson420
 


HAHAHA

So true, just find a nice drain to craw in and only come out in the dark. Seriously though i have often thought about living of the grid just to see what its like and if it possible.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 10:44 AM
link   
here's my take on big brother. i grew up with the mtv generation, watching "the real world" and generally having no shame. i've been conditioned to NOT CARE who watches me. The way i see it, i have nothing to hide. if they want to watch me to market to me, then go a., advertisements have never worked on me (have seen millions of car commercials in my life, yet at 30 still have never gotten my driver's license).
so i say, so what. if watching me and my mundane existance gets them off, then good for them



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:02 AM
link   
reply to post by tonypazzo
 





i've been conditioned to NOT CARE who watches me.


Has it never occurred to you that perhaps this was done intentionally, and with motive?
I must say, this is the first time ive heard of someone intelligent enough to at least comprehend that they have indeed, been conditioned. Kudos to you for that.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:04 AM
link   
i play a little game with myself occasionally to see if i can get to the other side of town with out being watched by cameras. it often entails going the scenic route so to speak and making a few awkward shortcuts ..... it's only a matter of time before I'm sectioned lol



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:06 AM
link   
triangulation takes three points.

at any given time you have your cell phone on,have withdrawn cash and/or used your debit card and have updaed some social network from an internet capable device.

your social is tied to all of your accounts and your payment method is rarely cash anymore so I know where you are within 60 miles every hour. the exception is if you get on a plane or a boat.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:09 AM
link   
reply to post by kevinunknown
 


DNA storage is very real.


POLICE in Wales have taken DNA samples from more than 55,000 innocent people, we can reveal.

Almost half of these – an estimated 23,651 – were taken by South Wales Police alone, costing the force a whopping £1.5m.

In total, the nation’s four police forces have spent an estimated £3.4m in gathering DNA samples from innocent people.

But, while the Government estimates that one in five people on the national DNA database are innocent of any crime, they have admitted they have NO IDEA what the real amount could be.

Since 2001, police have taken DNA samples from anyone they arrest or caution, even if no charges are brought against them. Current law allows an innocent person’s DNA profile to be kept for up to 12 years.

With an estimated 4.5 million profiles, the DNA database for England and Wales is the largest in the world. - rinf.com...


And that is just the ones they know about. I'm sure there are many more examples of this going on.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:15 AM
link   

Originally posted by blood0fheroes
reply to post by tonypazzo
 





i've been conditioned to NOT CARE who watches me.


Has it never occurred to you that perhaps this was done intentionally, and with motive?
I must say, this is the first time ive heard of someone intelligent enough to at least comprehend that they have indeed, been conditioned. Kudos to you for that.


of course it has! i'm just saying that i am aware of my "programming".. last month i canceled cable/tv. but my life isn't exactly worth "monitoring" so i don't worry about the cameras being EVERYWHERE. i mean, we're all stars now, aren't we?



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:25 AM
link   
You're list did not include the EZ Pass that everyone is using instead of paying cas at the toll booths. I can go online and see the date/time I passed through the toll plazas.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:40 AM
link   
I've been seeing these commercials advertising cameras inside of vehicles right from the manufacturer,( I forget who) they say something to the effect that it may seem like spying, but you should think of it as added safety, or some such garbage like that. Anyone else seen that?



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 12:23 PM
link   
reply to post by kevinunknown
 




1. GPS -- Global positioning chips are now appearing in everything from U.S. passports, cell phones, to cars.


There is no "GPS" in your passport it is an RFID chip and it can only be read from a max (with special equipment) of 33 feet away and only 4 inches with standard equipment.



2. Internet -- Internet browsers are recording your every move forming detailed cookies on your activities. The NSA has been exposed as having cookies on their site that don't expire until 2035. Major search engines know where you surfed last summer, and online purchases are databased, supposedly for advertising and customer service uses. IP addresses are collected and even made public.

Cookies do not mean tracking and search engines log what is searched and when, that is how they know what is trending. The only sight that i know of that uses your IP adress to harass you is wikipedia, they will write your ISP and ask for your personal info.




3. RFID -- Forget your credit cards which are meticulously tracked, or the membership cards for things so insignificant as movie rentals which require your SSN. Everyone has Costco, CVS, grocery-chain cards, and a wallet or purse full of many more. RFID "proximity cards" take tracking to a new level in uses ranging from loyalty cards, student ID, physical access, and computer network access.


Of course your credit cards are "tracked" that is why when you check your balance it says where the money was spent. Not every card you get has an RFID chip in it .



4. Traffic cameras -- License plate recognition has been used to remotely automate duties of the traffic police in the United States, but have been proven to have dual use in England such as to mark activists under the Terrorism Act.


This again does not mean they are tracking you, do the math. The number of cars and how many men in black it would take to monitor eveyone.



5. Computer cameras and microphones

This is an exploit that hackers use to spy on people who do not know how to set up their system. It does not mean big brother is watching you.



7. Biometrics

This is not tracking it is just another way to ID you. Yes they could be used on ATMs and at the workplace but if you have an bank account or a job those people already have all your info.



DNA


Dont rape or kill and you should be fine.



Microchips

Optional, nobody is making anyone do this.



Facial recognition


Ahhh behold The invisible mask



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 01:36 PM
link   
reply to post by kevinunknown
 


this is but my humble attempt to address the issues at hand:

1) GPS - find and remove chip if possible. if not the item is "hot" and must be periodicly "lost" and then "recovered" on city bus's/trains. the time in which the item is "lost" is your free time. people lose stuff all the time.

2)Internet - internet cafe's / libraries / a friends or your own iPhone that was temporarily "Stolen" then recovered

3) RFID - theres different genres of these. alex jones sells wallets that supposedly block the signal the credit card ones emit. however for the bigger stuff here a post i saved from ats user "bobs_uruncle":


"If you want to defeat this kind of technology in a single localized area, create a Faraday Cage. It's quite simple, line the entire area with some cheap electrically conductive metal like aluminum foil and ground it to a single point, like your water pipe or another earth ground like a steel spike driven 10 to 20 feet into the ground or a metal well pipe.

If you want to do it in a car, make a wideband RF receiver, pass the received signal to a small RF preamp, invert the signal and then pass it to an RF transmitter. The sum of the two signals, the input and the output will equal zero if done properly.

If you want to do this personally, same as the car, except attach a piezo electric transducer to your skin and emit the output through it which will use the skin as the emitter.

Summing any two equal but inverse signals equals zero. I did this kind of work though the NRC in Canada back in the mid 90's and it works quite well, we were however using it primarily for medical purposes, eg. large carrier wave function collapse during an indication of organ failures to prevent further damage or reverse the situation."


4) Cameras - the idea for any camera is to overexpose with light. this can be done from a distance with a laser. or for traffic Cams specifically you can install some IR emitting LEDS around the border of your plate. (idea from another ATS user, cant remember who). Infrared is not visible to the naked eye, but would still overexpose the Camera enough to not be able to read the plate. they make IR lasers as well, that can easily be mounted to a scope + tripod for pinpoint accuracy that can take out a camera rather stealthly from across town.

5) Computer cameras + microphones - peice of tape across camera lens, piece of foam(sound dampening acousti-foam if you can) across mic. i would keep it in a briefcase when im not useing it.

6) Sound surveillance - not sure about this one. speak in code i guess. perhaps we will be able to muffle that with sounds the human ear cannot hear as well like dog whistles.

7) Biometrics -

fingerprint - couple layers of superglue for temporary. bricklaying in your free time for permanent. ive heard of a barbaric way to do it with a pin and pineapple juice but i wouldn't recommend it.

Iris - depending on how good the technology is your dealing with. being under the influence of certain medications that turn your eyes red(reduce ocular pressure) or vastly constrict pupils. physical eye surgery via laser. or contact lenses modified to diminish or obscure the reading slightly...also probably forged with a laser of somekind.

Voice recognition - speak with the most authentic accent you can produce

8)DNA - no idea

9)Implantable RFID - see #3 or dig out with knife

10) Facial Recognition - all computerized so it shouldnt be hard to throw off. for instance stuff big wads of gum way up in the top part of your cheeks then keeping your jaw open more than it usually is throws off a good portion of the bone structure profile. sun glasses block a good portion, and simply walking around with your eyebrows up or down could help. you want to change the shape of your ./face not the features. Makeup can play depth tricks as well. flare your nose, etc..... and then of course growing or shaving off hair, or simply editing your hairline. botox.

just brainstorming. any and all of these could very well not work.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 01:41 PM
link   
reply to post by zaiger
 


just because they are not doing it, does not mean they are not setting up the infrastructure to do it in the future.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 02:07 PM
link   
reply to post by kevinunknown
 


My turn!

1. GPS - It is important to understand that virtually all cell phones track your location via GPS (where possible) to support mobile 911. I have personally worked with a large international company that provided this service to T-Mobile. The servers essentially sat there recording GPS data. Even if the reasoning is to provide 911, there's always someone who can misuse that information. I hate cell phones. I hate that I'm required to carry one for my job.

2. Internet - Much of this is *controllable* by the user! I can't stress this enough. Your Internet experience will seriously suffer, but you could not accept cookies, _javascript, etc. You can use anonymizing networks such as Tor, or VPN services (with a TRUSTED endpoint, else VPN is virtually worthless). This is something each person can control, depending on how much pain you want to go through. As was mentioned in another post, Google and Facebook, and sites like them, are incredibly dangerous. It amazes me that people stick their lives on Facebook. If Google were to acquire Facebook, Myspace, and all the other social media sites, it could very easily aggregate that data and make a ton of predictions based on computer models. Scary stuff, and it's happening right in peoples faces, but in a way that it doesn't worry most people.

3.RFID powder? That's real? I must research that.

4. Cameras are something I know quite a bit about. In doing my job, I helped setup over 150 cameras in a local city. It was a serious moral issue. I needed to continue to provide for my family, but had a major problem with having programmable cameras on each corner (and it's almost that bad, almost on each corner). Please realize that most cities that do that spend *alot* of money on those cameras. You're not going to shine a light at it and fool it into being overexposed for more than a second or two. Also, cameras are generally setup in such a way that another camera (at least 1) can see the one you're tampering with, recording you, so that they know who to arrest for messing with their camera that costs several thousand dollars each.

I don't want to be accused of fear mongering, but I saw 2 things related to this project that really turned my stomach. First, local civilians are regularly recruited to watch the camera output. That are the ones that raise the red flags for possible criminal activity. Which means, of course, if your neighbor hates you, you end up being investigated constantly as they continually flag you for criminal activity. Second, these cameras are programmable. In other words, they can be programmed to pan left 30 degrees, pause for 20 seconds, zoom in on a window in a residential neighborhood, pause for another 20 seconds, zoom out, pan left 30 degrees, etc etc. This example is one that I personally saw myself. The excuse given was that the house was a suspected drug house, so they justified zooming in and recording someones personal residence. To my knowledge, no arrests have ever been made in that house, yet there's a video record going back months. Amazing.

5. Simple steps can reduce the danger of laptop mics and webcams, as mentioned in other responses.

6. Public sound technology is already in use in a local city. They use a technology called the ShotSpotter Gunshot Location System which can pinpoint the location of gun fire. In fact, they've made several arrests by using this technology. More info can be found at www.shotspotter.com...

7. I'm pretty sure Mythbusters did an episode proving that it's extremely easy to fool fingerprint biometric scanners, even expensive ones. Biometrics is a rich industry tho, and this is something to keep an eye on.

Don't really have anything to add to the other points.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 02:08 PM
link   

Originally posted by LurkerMan
reply to post by zaiger
 


just because they are not doing it, does not mean they are not setting up the infrastructure to do it in the future.


That flawed backwards logic could be used to back up any erroneous premise.
"just because i am wrong does not mean that i will be wrong in the future"



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 02:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by zaiger

Originally posted by LurkerMan
just because they are not doing it, does not mean they are not setting up the infrastructure to do it in the future.


That flawed backwards logic could be used to back up any erroneous premise.
"just because i am wrong does not mean that i will be wrong in the future"


There is nothing flawed about that logic. It's just sour grapes to you and you want to whine about it, but it's still not flawed logic.

Just because we're not attacking Iran today doesn't mean we won't do it in the future. Is that fallacious reasoning? Of course not, it's common sense. Times change. If you don't think modern "national security" trends and crackdowns on civil liberties and privacy aren't going to continue into the future, well what is your "logic" on that one?



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 02:23 PM
link   

Originally posted by AquariusDescending
Just because we're not attacking Iran today doesn't mean we won't do it in the future. Is that fallacious reasoning? Of course not, it's common sense. Times change. If you don't think modern "national security" trends and crackdowns on civil liberties and privacy aren't going to continue into the future, well what is your "logic" on that one?


In my mind your example about Iran is referencing something we have a lot of experience and knowledge about. We know Iran is a problem. We know they keep thumbing their nose at most of the rest of the world. We know they're pursuing nuclear weapons. Therefore there is a basis of fact with which to say "we may attack Iran someday in the future".

Your original comment, saying that even tho they're not doing it now, it doesn't mean they aren't planning for the future, might be true, but it's based on much less fact. You could very well end up being right, but at this time we have less experience and hard facts to base that inference on. Please note I said "less experience and hard facts", because it's certainly within the realm of possibility (eg, Patriot Act).

At least that's how it comes across in my mind.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 02:26 PM
link   
reply to post by AquariusDescending
 




There is nothing flawed about that logic. It's just sour grapes to you and you want to whine about it, but it's still not flawed logic.

Yes there is.



Just because we're not attacking Iran today doesn't mean we won't do it in the future. Is that fallacious reasoning? Of course not, it's common sense.


That is sound reasoning however the title and idea of the thread is


Top Ten ways they Track Us. Everyone should read this

Meaning that this is how they are tracking us now, it does not say top ten ways they are going to track us or are planning to track us. So the idea that they are using these methods to "track us" is wrong. Adding the "well they might do it someday" is just an attempt to change the premise of the OP and an effort to be right after being shown to be wrong. The example of us attacking iran would not be correct if it was started as "Ten ways we are attacking iran" as opposed to "ten ways we will be attacking iran.



If you don't think modern "national security" trends and crackdowns on civil liberties and privacy aren't going to continue into the future, well what is your "logic" on that one?

Typical strawman argument, I made no mention of the "trends" of national security. That is my logic on that one.

edit to add:
Do not take it so personally, it is not like the OP did anything besides copy and paste it here.

[edit on 13-7-2010 by zaiger]



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 07:35 PM
link   
once its implemented they don't have to stick to the original function of the technology. theres nothing binding them to their original excuse.

everything to lose, nothing to gain. (from the citizens perspective)

although you brit's dont have anything to worry about, you never had freedom to begin with. so you will probably see this as a great thing that keeps you safer.


on another note, i think its odd that the government doesn't hesitate to prohibit and ban something it deems "dangerous", even if its only dangerous when its being used in a way other than its intended purpose. they just assume it WILL be abused, so they prohibit it all together.

yet citizens dont take the same approach with their Government. odd.



new topics

top topics



 
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join