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Centre of gravity theory for dominance of black sprinters and white swimmers

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posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 10:45 PM
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reply to post by PsykoOps
 


The more obvious explanation for a lack of African-American hockey players is cultural influence.

I believe young African-American children are almost more expected to compete in sports like basketball and football. Even at the college level you almost never see any Black players. I live in Fairbanks, Alaska where hockey is a much bigger part of local life here.

Alot of kids up here are encouraged to play hockey and the leagues exist for them to have fun and compete with other kids. You just wouldn't ordinarly find that in a pre-dominant Black community somewhere in the lower 48. Plus the kids up here have the bigger kids and the college hockey players to look up to as examples of success in the sport.

In general, it's just more encouraged and a bigger part of the local culture up here because it always has been. I would suspect the same thing goes in Canada.

It's almost as if certain areas of the country have 3 or 4 different sports that are a much bigger part of their culture than any other sport. Thus, participation in those specific sports is simpy encouraged more.

-ChriS

[edit on 13-7-2010 by BlasteR]




posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by harpsounds
 


If you knew just two things about two groups of people what would you assume.

Group A all have blond hair and blue eyes. You thus know they all have this trait.

Group B all have black hair and brown eyes. You thus know they all have this trait.

But what would you assume is the same for Group A and Group B?

Would you assume A and B all had the same skin color?
Would you assume A and B all had the same height?
Would you assume A and B all lived to the same ages?
Would you assume A and B all had the same musical abilities?
Would you assume A and B all had the same intelligence?

All of these assumptions would be nothing more than guesses. And basically that is what POLITICALLY CORRECT TALK IS. It is a bunch of
guesses that fit ones wishes or beliefs. The facts are conveniently ignored.

Facts cause cognitive dissonance. Thus they must be ignored.

In fact some here would tell us there is no such thing as Group A and Group B. LOL



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 09:54 AM
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Originally posted by BlasteR
reply to post by PsykoOps
 

It's almost as if certain areas of the country have 3 or 4 different sports that are a much bigger part of their culture than any other sport. Thus, participation in those specific sports is simpy encouraged more.

-ChriS

[edit on 13-7-2010 by BlasteR]


While this is true, why do we not have any hispanic running backs in the NFL? There are plenty of hispanic running backs down here in Texas. And outside of those freaks at the Oakland Coliseum, you won't find any more rabid football fans than here in Texas....including the latino population.

Yet, there just aren't that many latino RB's in the league, or in D1 college.

Matter of fact, how many latino track stars are there? I graduated with one that ran a 4.25 in the 40. So i know there is some speed there.

It is almost like there is another impact besides just "nature" and "nurture".



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 10:50 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


You could ask a similar question as to why there aren't many (any?) Indian/Pakistani Football (the real one, where you use ya feet
) players in The FA. Seems strange, as I know plenty who play for amateur teams.



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by Mobius1974
 


Sorrry, i have yet to see any kind of scientific evidence to back up those claims. And i just came from google. Everyone says the same thing, lots of opinions but nothing concrete.

So yes, your going to have to provide some links. And not some crackpot or someone's opinion either, i'm talking actual scientific data that can be reproduced in a study.

I'm interested in what you said, seeing that black americans aren't full blooded Africans but a mixture of Africans and European blood.



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 11:34 AM
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Originally posted by nik1halo
reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


You could ask a similar question as to why there aren't many (any?) Indian/Pakistani Football (the real one, where you use ya feet
) players in The FA. Seems strange, as I know plenty who play for amateur teams.


Yeah, now that is another good mystery.

I wonder if religion plays a part? Or if just living in a world where the lifestyle is harsher?

I am unsure.....


......but if "nurture" doesn't hold the key, then should we continue to ignore "nature"?



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 11:36 AM
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Originally posted by cenpuppie
reply to post by Mobius1974
 


Sorrry, i have yet to see any kind of scientific evidence to back up those claims. And i just came from google. Everyone says the same thing, lots of opinions but nothing concrete.

So yes, your going to have to provide some links. And not some crackpot or someone's opinion either, i'm talking actual scientific data that can be reproduced in a study.

I'm interested in what you said, seeing that black americans aren't full blooded Africans but a mixture of Africans and European blood.


That is a hoot.

Who would fund such a study? The Nazi's? I bet they did do some studies on it, and had it all suppressed.

Besides, what they found was that the Aryans were the best athletes, regardless of how many races they failed to win.

But the point is, no one will study it because just studying it causes an outcry.



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 12:00 PM
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Oh lord, is this ever a dangerous subject to discuss without the "R" word flying around. Drawing any line between races based on any factor can easily fall into that trap.

Black people find swimming comparatively difficult - I would love to give you a scientific link that supports the reasons for this, but there aren't any, the reasons for the lack of such analysis should be obvious.

Therefore, this is just my own opinion, but black people have much higher muscle density, and a heavier skeletal frame than non-blacks, and therefore they have less buoyancy.

Conversely, their greater muscle mass and super fast twitch fibre concentrations (see Colin Jackson en.wikipedia.org... ) equal greater speed in short distance running events (100M and 200M) - however that advantage bleeds off at the 400M mark based on the amount of oxygen required to feed all that muscle. Of course black people still excel in the long distance running events, but those athletes are people from the African sub-continent who have much smaller, leaner frames better suited to long distance running.

Therefore I disagree with the significance the article applies to center of gravity, I'm sure it does make a difference, but I don't believe it makes THAT much difference.

I understand what dangers can result from making any distinction based on race, but there must come a time when we can all just recognize and embrace our differences as part of our own unique biological make up, instead of trying to constantly hide the facts as if they are some type of shameful secret.

I think it's time we all became comfortable in our own skin.



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 12:55 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Sorry, I should have been more precise with my wording. I meant British Indians (born here).



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 12:58 PM
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I think we should all give ourselves a big pat on the back for managing to get through 3 pages on this subject and continuing to have a sensible discussion about a touchy subject without the R word being thrown at anyone!

Congratulations! This is a testament to the members of ATS.




posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by RRokkyy
 


Not that hard to understand. The human brain has a line which all humans are above except of course those with severe diseases that cause mental retardation.

Maybe there are small deviations in brain size, but capacity remains the same to learn. Some humans even have larger or different brains by mutation, such as Einstein, who was missing several characteristics of a human brain, and had some areas wider.

But the point at hand is this. It does not take away from their humanity and is not isolated to race. The fact that a crow can make spears while a cat with a bigger brain cannot proved brain size is not related to intelligence.



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by Gorman91
reply to post by RRokkyy
 


Not that hard to understand. The human brain has a line which all humans are above except of course those with severe diseases that cause mental retardation.

Maybe there are small deviations in brain size, but capacity remains the same to learn. Some humans even have larger or different brains by mutation, such as Einstein, who was missing several characteristics of a human brain, and had some areas wider.

But the point at hand is this. It does not take away from their humanity and is not isolated to race. The fact that a crow can make spears while a cat with a bigger brain cannot proved brain size is not related to intelligence.



This is exactly correct. I posted this in another thread located HERE:




Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
Where is your mind? I don't mean your brain, i mean your mind.

Often, we have humans blurring the line between the two. But this is a false assumption. Of course, you have a dig a little deeper and think on the matter...but it is obvious that the mind and the brain are not the same thing.

But they are related. This is likely the point at which people make the erroneous distinction.

Consider the case of people who recieve radical hemispherectomies, yet are able to continue with life and do things like graduate college? How do we reconcile their ability to maintain memory, reasoning, and logic while missing half of their brain?

Consider the following article:

www.articlealley.com...


On Jun 2, 2005, NBC Philadelphia had an interesting report. Christina Santhouse had caught a virus that caused a rare brain disorder known as Rasmussen's Syndrome at an age of 8. And her doctor had to perform hemispherectomy, removal of half of the brain, on her. After 10 years, Christina was about to graduate from high school with honors. After the surgery, she had a slight limp and her left hand didn't work at all. She had also lost her peripheral vision, but otherwise, she was an ordinary teen. A similar case was reported on Telegraph (UK) on May 29, 2002, a girl named Bursa had the same disorder and her left brain was removed when she was 3, she became fluent in Dutch and Turkish when she was 7. In 1987, A. Smith reported that one patient with hemispherectomy had completed college, attended graduate school and scored above average on intelligence tests. Studies have found no significant long-term effects on memory, personality, or humor after the procedure, and minimal changes in cognitive function overall.


The outcome of hemispherectomy is surprising. Neuroscience tends to suggest memory is stored in the neurons in the brain. If that premise stands true, removing half of the brain would destroy one's memory if memory is stored in the network structure of neurons as one school of cognitive physiology suggests, or at least destroy half of the memory if bits of memory information are stored in individual neurons in the brain as suggested by another school of cognitive neuroscience. But it is apparent that the results disagree with either of the explanations. Removing part of the brain has been one of the standard surgical operations for severe epilepsy and has been performed thousands of times. Many of the results are quite similar to those of hemispherectomy. The orthodox explanation for the observation is that information stored in the infected brain areas is duplicated in the health part of the brain prior to the surgery. This rationalization is still inadequate when you take into account how a brain surgery is performed. Surgeon has to remove the infected area and some surrounding health tissue, sometimes a much larger tissue than the infected area, to make sure infection does not spread. If the information stored in the infected areas is reproduced somewhere in the brain before surgical procedure, some information is still lost when surrounding health brain tissue is removed, consequently the memory would suffer. This is not observed after the surgery. So it is necessary to assume that the memory stored in the neighboring health tissue is also replicated in other parts of the brain. This raises a question: how does the brain know how much health tissue is going to be taken out? If the brain does not know, surgeries will inevitable destruct part of the memory. The belief that memory is stored in the brain (in neurons or in the network of neurons) apparently contradicts with findings in brain surgeries.


The article goes on to show that the same can be said in animals like rats, but that is for a whole 'nuther subject.

What this shows is that not only is MEMORY stored in a higher place, but so is the ability to reason and logic. Logic supersedes man. Man merely taps into logic for his own use. His ability to tap into this logic must then dictate his perceived "intellect".

So what/who is the logical force that man is able to utilize? It is a force that also contains the elements of memory (which harkens to concepts such as an Akashic Record).

When i am challenged by someone who claims that there is no God, no creative force, this is my evidence. My shield. It is proof that there is a higher mind than me, than all of us. We are all connected into it. Our brains are merely the "modem".



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


This is most interesting.

I myself have to admit I don't think my brain is the be all and end all of me. i control my brain.... but how? If it is the cpu, what is the cpu of the cpu? I mentioned elsewhere that I program my own brain when working or doing something. I get distracted easily, so I'll play some binaural stuff or something. It's like a bug to a flashlight. My brain listens to the music or noise and does not get distracted. Then I take the parts of my brain that I need and pull them away to work while the rest listens and is distracted. Because they are not listening to words or seeing videos, those parts of my brain are subdued, and I go into a kind of work trance, perhaps? It's definably lowered consciousness and a dumbing down, I know that much. I've discovered this semester that unfortunately the creative and innovation parts of my mind get distracted too. When looking at my work now, after it was all done, it looks bland to my full conscious self. So thus now I am working on new programming to make sure those creative and innovation parts of my mind are not distracted but rather working.

This usage of my brain as a tool, not as myself, leads me to believe in something more. If nothing of material worth is operating the brain, no organs or anything, it must be something beyond what is material and observable.

I even now have learned how to play music without anything but my mind. People don't believe me, but if I want to, I can play any song I know in my head in full quality without the need of anything on my ear. I heard that song and learned it. Now its in my head and forever can be played at will.

[edit on 14-7-2010 by Gorman91]



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 


I do that with music as well. I hear intricate detail. I have to hear it a few times, and keep it refreshed from time to time (or remember it frequently).

I have talked to spiritual men in my life. Nothing deep, just conversation about just about anything other than matters of spirit. One thing i heard them say time and again when discussing the various things that men do is that "we are multifaceted beings."

That is very interesting. "Multifaceted beings". I didn't ask for clarification because i was young, and clarification always came in the form of something i didn't comprehend. But as i aged i considered that phrase. If we are multifaceted then that would mean either:

- we have the ability to exist in multiplicity with each facet representing another piece of our whole

- we are all a part of the "Godhead", and each of us represents a facet of Him.

Each of these thoughts has been mulled over for many years by myself. I have considered them in every possible way. Not because i believe it to be truth insomuch as it provides an excellent exercise in thinking in the abstract.

The best I have come up with as a true belief is that our mind exists outside the body. I strongly suspect that if we could peer into tetradimensional space we would see hints of what this is.

What really drives me nuts is I cannot answer the question of "Who am I?" I know who i am as a human...but this multifaceted being, what am I like? What do i do when i am not "here"?



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Well at the risk of going off topic, I recall when I was young and a death occurred. Prayer followed with a dream. The most realistic one I've ever had. I was in darkness with no flesh. I only had consciousness. Descartes's "I think therefor I am". No sight, no feeling. nothing to say I am alive but thought. Silent speaking in my mind which had no noise. Thought and thought only. Then suddenly a light became visible and a deep voice, maybe God, maybe an angel, who knows, told me "I am who I am, you are who you are, we all are who we all are". This followed with a massive explosion of light and I woke up in shock.

Since then I view my body and whole not as me, but as a tool. I look at mirrors and I can't see my face anymore. I see a person, but not me. I see a body.

To you're "who am I?" I would answer that which I was in the dream. I was the fleshless thought. I was consciousness without form. I was me. That was me. I think therefore I am.

They've asked gorillas these things. Who is God? They say "I am". Who created the world? It answers "another woman". Simplistic responses to simplistic questions they have not yet come to understand. I've seen crows go to a windy cliff and hover in its updraft while the sun sets. They watch the planes fly by, becoming silent once they make their roars. Then when the sun sets, they all go quite. Is this religious practice? Like how we thought a chariot in the sky pulled the moon and sun? Who knows. They do not respond to death much, so they do not understand it perhaps. Dolphins and Elephants understand death. But they do nothing. They come near the bones of their dead, and continue on. They do not bury. They remember who they are, even when all the flesh is gone. They remain connected to the body. They care. But do they know? WHo knows.

The fact is humanity is unique. We are one. And united in our ability to be compassionate and helpful and creative while knowing all the same that in the end it matters not. We know we are all doomed to die, and yet we try so hard. As a Christen I love studying these things. Little clues to what is beyond. It is wonderful to think about.

However, though I tried to pull that back on topic, you might want to PM to continue this discussion.

Nice contemplating with you.



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by BlasteR
reply to post by RRokkyy
 


Biologically speaking, Brain size has nothing to do with overall intelligence. I'm confused what this has to do with anything whatsoever.

-ChriS

Chinese have an average IQ of about 106 and the largest brain size.
Whites average 100-98 ,medium size brain.
Africans have the smallest size brain.


www.news-medical.net...
Brain size and intelligence are related
19. June 2005 15:09
People with bigger brains are smarter than their smaller-brained counterparts, according to a study conducted by a Virginia Commonwealth University researcher published in the journal "Intelligence."

The study could settle a long-standing scientific debate about the relationship between brain size and intelligence. Ever since German anatomist and physiologist Frederick Tiedmann wrote in 1836 that there exists "an indisputable connection between the size of the brain and the mental energy displayed by the individual man," scientists have been searching for biological evidence to prove his claim.

"For all age and sex groups, it is now very clear that brain volume and intelligence are related," said lead researcher Michael A. McDaniel, Ph.D., an industrial and organizational psychologist who specializes in the study of intelligence and other predictors of job performance.
Continued on Next page >>



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by RRokkyy
 


So then how do we reconcile the patient (who was black, by the way) that recieved a full hemispherectomy (removal of half his brain) and was still able to graduate college a few short years later?

What of the cockatoo, which has a brain that is far smaller than, say...a lion yet displays far greater intelligence?

Have you ever heard of "multiple intelligences"? It would seem to me that basing intelligence on only math ability, or the ability to pass a test that is devised by western standards (and therefore foreign to most Africans) is a poor judge of ability. Have you seen the average test for an 8th grader around the turn of the last century? there is a thread here on ATS about it. I was able to answer maybe 20% of the questions on there. By their standards i would be an idiot. Yet, in the opinion of my peers I am a pretty bright guy.

To quantify brain power vs brain size, you need to create a test that truly test brain power, not indoctrination into the societal norms of a particular culture.



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 10:47 PM
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Originally posted by RRokkyy

"For all age and sex groups, it is now very clear that brain volume and intelligence are related," said lead researcher Michael A. McDaniel, Ph.D., an industrial and organizational psychologist who specializes in the study of intelligence and other predictors of job performance.
Continued on Next page >>


One more thing...what are they labelling "intelligence"? The ability to process the mathematics of this reality? Or the ability to see and understand? Are they measuring a learned characterstic, or one that is ingrained into the biological unit of the body?

Intelligence is not a learned thing. It is something you just have. You can use it to make the learned things more useful....but at the end of the day all things that are learned are better called "wisdom" or "knowledge".



posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 02:33 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Well, as far as professional football goes there are a few notable latino players but you are right that there aren't many.

I knew a guy in High School that was latino from a different school who could run the mile in 4:45 or something as a sophomore... I know they have talent to compete.

Honestly, I'm not sure why there aren't more latinos in olympics and pro sports.

Racism is probably part of it. Part of it is just numbers. No telling how many white or black players there are for every latino at the college level. In a way, latinos have to compete against all those other people to move on to the professional level. The odds are against them from the very beginning.

-ChriS



posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 03:05 AM
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Surely most people accept that there are genetic/biological differences between races. Just compare the success of different races in the Olympics. Similarly- different gene pools make us susceptible to different health conditions. But then of course you have to add cultural and environmental factors into the mix. So there will always be people who don't fit the general pattern.
Those who cry racism need to get over themselves. It is what it is.



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