Hollow Phobos, and it was not captured by Mars! Scientists says

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posted on Jul, 12 2010 @ 11:23 PM
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Originally posted by Arken

Originally posted by ZuluChaka
reply to post by Arken
 


There is no way an object of this size is going to form hollow. Gravity would always bring the heavier mass to the core.


Right.
Same conclusion.

But then, why Phobos is hollow and with huge cavities?



Could it be a geological anomaly ??

[edit on 12-7-2010 by Lacenaire]




posted on Jul, 12 2010 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by Arken
 

Arken, it is an interesting find chief; however, keep an eye out for the details. It says, "We conclude that the interior of Phobos likely contains large voids.".

According to that one sentence, Phobus has cavities hidden within its structure. It does not mean that it is completely hollow.

Good find.


What we have to do now is follow this up with a more in-depth source, which comes from a scientific paper done by those involved. Keep in mind that they are only theorizing, so we need to see where this will lead.

Hopefully someone over at NASA.gov will provide more insight.

[edit on 12-7-2010 by Section31]



posted on Jul, 12 2010 @ 11:41 PM
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For all those who don't remember:

news.bbc.co.uk...



posted on Jul, 12 2010 @ 11:42 PM
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reply to post by Lacenaire
 

I believe you are talking about Helium 3.
Yes, it would be a good source of energy if we had the means to utilize it. We don't. The fusion reactors necessary to do so are a very long way down the road.

Large voids does not mean hollow. Is a wheel of swiss cheese hollow?



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 12:45 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


What's your over all opinion of all the Phobos mystery? From Phobos 2 disappearing and the pic of the white long thing to the monolith and so on?

Even if NASA knew or found out anything will we ever know?



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 12:55 AM
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reply to post by Overtime
 

Spacecraft are known to have problems and "disappear". It's just human technology after all.

The long white thing was assuredly a sensor artifact as shown by Internos:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

The "monolith" appears to be an interesting geological feature. My guess is that it is impact debris.

We continue to "know" more all the time and will continue to do so, though not at the rate that many desire.




[edit on 7/13/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 01:17 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Lacenaire
 

I believe you are talking about Helium 3.
Yes, it would be a good source of energy if we had the means to utilize it. We don't. The fusion reactors necessary to do so are a very long way down the road.

Large voids does not mean hollow. Is a wheel of swiss cheese hollow?


Deuterium, also called heavy hydrogen, is a stable isotope of hydrogen with a natural abundance in the oceans of Earth of approximately one atom in 6,500 of hydrogen (~154 ppm). Deuterium thus accounts for approximately 0.0154% (alternately, on a mass basis: 0.0308%) of all naturally occurring hydrogen in the oceans on Earth (see VSMOW; the abundance changes slightly from one kind of natural water to another).

en.wikipedia.org...

If light nuclei are forced together, they will fuse with a yield of energy because the mass of the combination will be less than the sum of the masses of the individual nuclei. If the combined nuclear mass is less than that of iron at the peak of the binding energy curve, then the nuclear particles will be more tightly bound than they were in the lighter nuclei, and that decrease in mass comes off in the form of energy according to the Einstein relationship. For elements heavier than iron, fission will yield energy.


For potential nuclear energy sources for the Earth, the deuterium-tritium fusion reaction contained by some kind of magnetic confinement seems the most likely path. However, for the fueling of the stars, other fusion reactions will dominate.

hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...

P hobos (fear) is a moon of Mars and was named after an attendant of the Roman war god Mars. It was discovered by Asaph Hall in 1877. Phobos is a dark body that appears to be composed of C-type surface materials. It is similar to the C-type (blackish carbonaceous chondrite) asteroids that exist in the outer asteroid belt. Some scientists speculate that Phobos and Mars' other moon, Deimos, are captured asteroids. However, other scientists point to evidence that contradicts this theory. Phobos shows striated patterns which are probably cracks caused by the impact event of the largest crater on the moon.

library.thinkquest.org...

XPLOdER



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 01:35 AM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 

Yes, tritium (3H, hydrogen 3)-deuterium is the easiest reaction to to initiate but it is not the most desirable. Helium 3 (which is theorized to exist in some abundance on the Moon) would produce a more energetic and "cleaner" reaction. I don't think tritium is thought to be much more abundant on the Moon than it is on Earth.


Advocates of He3-based fusion point to the fact that current efforts to develop fusion-based power generation, like the ITER megaproject, use the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle, which is problematical. (See "International Fusion Research.") Deuterium and tritium are both hydrogen isotopes, and when they're fused in a superheated plasma, two nuclei come together to create a helium nucleus--consisting of two protons and two neutrons--and a high-energy neutron.

www.technologyreview.com...

In any case, we don't have any fusion reactors producing energy and we won't for quite a while.


[edit on 7/13/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 01:44 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks, I missed that thread. Never seen the full pic set of Phoebos 2 which shows same glitchy white line in other pics of Jupiter! Shame on that Russian lady



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 01:44 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


here is a history channel ancient aliens dealing with our moon skip to 7.20

interesting if slightly strange our moon is hollow/swiss cheese too

www.youtube.com...

XPLOdER



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 01:50 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


thanks phage
im interested to study this thanks for the information
and links

i beleive NASA admits the moon rang like a bell for over an hour after the luner escape vechicle that was colided in the moon landing after take off

is it that more moons with show signs of incorect mass/orbit ratios or is it just this one?

buzz aldrin wanted humanity to study phobos i wounder what he knew

thanks phage



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 02:06 AM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 

"Ringing like a bell" doesn't really mean anything but it does create a mental picture of hollowness. Hang a sold block of steel on a string and hit it. It will "ring like a bell" but it isn't hollow.

There is nothing "incorrect" about the orbit of Phobos (our our own moon). The orbit of Phobos tell us its mass (the recent studies have confirmed its mass with greater accuracy). The "big deal" (not really) is that Phobos is physically "larger" than it should be to have the mass that it does. It's like Swiss cheese. You may buy a whole wheel but a lot of it isn't cheese. Fortunately, you buy cheese by weight so you don't get gypped. If you were buying by volume, you would be.

Buzz Aldrin wants (he's still alive) people to explore space. I agree with him. He thinks that using Phobos as a base of operations for exploring Mars is a good idea. I agree with him.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 02:12 AM
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Just chucking this out there - and may already be mentioned.
As much as I would love us to find Phobos is hollow - could it simply have such a low density in the middle it appears hollow? This could be caused by denser matter only covering the surface of a low density object that had already formed.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 02:16 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


hi phage, i have a question thats slightly off track from the previous.
are you familiar with the 5.184mHz frequency and its uses?
i ask this because as well as it being the universal atomic clock speed it has a number of other significant applications.
do you know along the lines of what i am talking about?

p.s. user borrowing xploders account to ask question, thanks..^O^



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 02:20 AM
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Originally posted by ZuluChaka
reply to post by Arken
 


There is no way an object of this size is going to form hollow. Gravity would always bring the heavier mass to the core.


well duh! thats why many people believe its not of natural origin....I.E. its of extra terrestrial origin



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 02:58 AM
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Uh Oh! Here we go again! Hmmm...So is Phobos an alien space ship?? It probably is according to a White House Advisor!
Here's a thread I found that says so!

Phobos May Be Alien Space Base: White House adviser!!




posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 02:59 AM
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isn't it also stated that our own moon is also hollow._javascript:icon('
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uggy 428319



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 03:16 AM
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I guess one first has to define "hollow" ... is a ping pong ball hollow because it has only a fraction of a mm thick "crust" or is a tennis ball still deemed hollow though it has a "crust" close to 5mm? Simplistically, what say if an object had a diameter of 1m and the "crust" was 49cm thick ... would the 2cm of space in the center make the object hollow?

Just pondering



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 04:24 AM
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I think the whole argument over semantics is a little silly. What do you guys think a void is anyway? It means empty. OK so maybe it's not hollow like a basketball (but maybe it is) but as another has pointed out, if it was some sort of alien space ship (and I'm not saying it is) then it would not be 100% hollow. It would have large voids or rooms. So allthough not a smoking gun or 100% proof, this round still goes to the alien crowed.



On a side note. What is this rubble pile nonsense. It's obviously not a rubble pile. Maybe Phage can clear this up for me. Is there some technical definition of a rubble pile that is at compleate odds with what it sounds like? I just don't see how something like Phobos could be considered a bunch of rocks held together by their collective gravity.



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 04:49 AM
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Originally posted by ZuluChaka
reply to post by Arken
 


Well nobody has proved that. Why could it not just as easily consist primarily of a very pourous material. It is quite a leap to assume that just because something is not as dense as you assumed it would be that it is therefore hollow.


Probably just a massive pumice stone.





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