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4,000-year-old strands of hair unravel human travels

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posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:09 PM
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4,000-year-old strands of hair unravel human travels







Inuk — named after the word for man in the Greenland Inuit language — is the first ancient human being to have his genetic code read, offering important insights into his biology, appearance and migrations.


Video:
edition.cnn.com.../video/world/2010/02/12/rush.greenland.oldest.human.itn

Articles:
blog.taragana.com...
www.timesonline.co.uk...





posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:11 PM
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This amazing! more proof to show we're more incredible then we thought. Who knows? Soon we might meet aliens one day.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:14 PM
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Too bad we haven't done more with stem cells so we could possibly use his hair to clone him and actually meet a caveman looking eskimo.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by Str8Jackit
 


We can clone a Neanderthal for 30 million dollars. That would be great to do.We can all play God, make an army of strong and savage men and women.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by Blue_Mage
 


Why not clone that Neanderthal? IF there is no God, how could one "play" God?



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by mistafaz
 


who said anything about God being real or not. I'm just saying we can clone one because we have all the capabilities.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:28 PM
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No offense to anyone, nor am I trying to be a mod, but please keep it on topic, I don't want this to turn into a debate about cloning or god.

Thanks.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:40 PM
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reply to post by Blue_Mage
 


I was just screwing around.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:50 PM
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Once again, I will be the "bad guy".

this has been done before, a few months back. Maybe the use of the search feature in the future will help glean topics that have been presented and discussed (to various extents). As I recall, DNA tests pointed that Inuk's area of origin was northeast Siberia (or northwest Siberia? Siberia it was, that is for sure!)



posted on Jul, 13 2010 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by mistafaz
 


I don't think it would be ethically right to clone a member of an extinct species solely for study, especially an intelligent, self-aware hominid. That man/woman would be alone, confused, scared, etc.



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