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Solar Blast

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posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 12:22 AM
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The current G1 storm (the minimum geomagnetic storm level, with a Kp index of 5 a few hours ago) is not the result of the activity from sunspot 1087.

The solar wind began increasing in speed at about 20:00UTC. The density showed a slight increase then a slow decline. This kind of activity is indicative of the flow from a coronal hole. The one that began pointing at us three or four days ago.


At the same time, the magnetic field (Bz) of the solar wind went kind of nuts and took on a generally southward orientation which it has maintained. This alignment of the magnetic field of the solar wind with the magnetic field is one factor which can lead to increased geomagnetic activity, allowing an increased flow of particles into the ionosphere. The kind of activity we are seeing. There isn't much reason to expect any increase in activity. It will probably bump along like this for a day or so.

[edit on 7/15/2010 by Phage]




posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 03:44 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


What solar wind speeds and proton density levels would you guess are cause for concern or out of the ordinary? We are curently experiencing 460.5km/sec solar winds....



posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 04:04 AM
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reply to post by rajaten
 

It takes a combination of factors to create a strong geomagnetic storm. There are no hard and firm numbers. There can be low speed with high density or, as we are seeing now, low density and high speed. Sometimes, but less commonly, we get both high density and speed. But it's the fluctuations of the magnetic field being carried by the solar wind that is most influential, in particular that southern twist. Space weather is just as, if not more, complex than atmospheric weather.

Here are some examples of what the solar wind can do and still not cause a lot of problems.
www3.nict.go.jp...
www3.nict.go.jp...
www3.nict.go.jp...







[edit on 7/15/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 04:24 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


What would be the chief factor that may cause a strong geomagnetic storm? An M class flare?



posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 04:34 AM
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reply to post by rajaten
 

An M class solar flare might cause some minor disruption of satellite and radio communications at high latitudes. That's about it.

Solar flares don't cause geomagnetic storms. The solar wind does. Solar flares don't really affect the solar wind. CMEs would be the major influence.

[edit on 7/15/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 06:10 AM
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Sunspot 720 released an X7 flare on the 20 January 2005, the solar wind density went as high as 29 protons/cm3.

The protons reached earth in a matter of minutes instead of hours (or days).

This is because the sunspot was in an area that magnetically connects the sun with the earth, 60° west longitude.


The sun's magnetic field spirals out into the solar system like water from a lawn sprinkler. (Why? The sun spins like a lawn sprinkler does.) The magnetic field emerging from solar longitude 60o W bends around and intersects Earth. Protons are guided by magnetic force fields so, on January 20th, there was a superhighway for protons leading all the way from sunspot 720 to our planet.
*


Virtually the perfect solar storm, luckily it was only an X7. Imagine if it was an X28 storm!

All this fuss over B, C and M class flares, I dunno.



posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 06:16 AM
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[edit on 15-7-2010 by rajaten]



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 11:09 AM
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Finally i have found a thread about the Sun's protons!!!

Ive been flicking on and off of Space Weather today as the proton/density has been slowly creeping up throughout the day.

but in the last 30 minutes it has gone from around 8.9 to 13.4. With Solar wind speed: 322.5 km/sec.

We have had no sun spots for 3 days now, but there is a stream of solar wind flowing from a coronal hole which is expected to reach Earth on August 24th or 25th.



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 02:29 PM
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Wow
Solar wind
speed: 340.4 km/sec
density: 20.7 protons/cm3

The proton density has shot up since earlyer on, concerning or nothing to worry about???



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by boo1981
 


Thanks Boo - do you have a link with further information - wonder if this is a concern?



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 


Yer sure, ive just been going on space weather

www.spaceweather.com...

Its dropped down again now to 15.2!



posted on Aug, 23 2010 @ 03:59 PM
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Were are all the experts when you need them???

Just clicked on space weather and saw that the Solar wind
speed: 366.4 km/sec
density: 41.6 protons/cm3!!!

I have never seen it this high before.



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