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Another reason for the existence of the North and South Poles?

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posted on Jul, 9 2010 @ 11:05 PM
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Laugh all you want at my expense if this is ready common theory.

The poles are the slowest moving part of the globe, right? The equator speeds by and builds up a sort of "friction" related heat.




posted on Jul, 9 2010 @ 11:30 PM
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There are quite a few theories that the Earth is hollow.

hollowplanet.blogspot.com...

There are also theories that the poles will shift again as the earth passes the galactic equator over the next 30+ years or so.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jul, 9 2010 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by dlifesjrny
Laugh all you want at my expense if this is ready common theory.

The poles are the slowest moving part of the globe, right? The equator speeds by and builds up a sort of "friction" related heat.


What is it rubbing against?

The planet is a sphere; try an experiment.

Spin a bowling ball, feel the pole at the axis of spin. (the one not touching the ground since that one wouldn't accurately represent the earth spinning in 3d space) And then feel a part on the equator (after its finished spinning)

[edit on 7/9/2010 by eNumbra]



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 02:14 AM
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Originally posted by eNumbra
Spin a bowling ball, feel the pole at the axis of spin. (the one not touching the ground since that one wouldn't accurately represent the earth spinning in 3d space) And then feel a part on the equator (after its finished spinning)

How do I make the outside of the bowling ball travel at 1000 miles per hour? That's about how fast the surface of the Earth is moving near the equator, so to generate the same friction I need about the same speed at the surface of the bowling ball, right?



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 02:19 AM
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Originally posted by eNumbra

Originally posted by dlifesjrny
Laugh all you want at my expense if this is ready common theory.

The poles are the slowest moving part of the globe, right? The equator speeds by and builds up a sort of "friction" related heat.


What is it rubbing against?

The planet is a sphere; try an experiment.

Spin a bowling ball, feel the pole at the axis of spin. (the one not touching the ground since that one wouldn't accurately represent the earth spinning in 3d space) And then feel a part on the equator (after its finished spinning)

[edit on 7/9/2010 by eNumbra]


I think he may mean that the earths core rotates within the mantle.


"Earth's Core Rotates Faster than Surface, Study Confirms"
www.livescience.com...



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 07:23 AM
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Originally posted by this_is_who_we_are

I think he may mean that the earths core rotates within the mantle.


"Earth's Core Rotates Faster than Surface, Study Confirms"
www.livescience.com...


That makes more sense.


Originally posted by Arbitrageur
How do I make the outside of the bowling ball travel at 1000 miles per hour? That's about how fast the surface of the Earth is moving near the equator, so to generate the same friction I need about the same speed at the surface of the bowling ball, right?

Assuming he didn't mean the inner core's friction against the crust and my postulate isn't flawed in that sense. Friction against what?

[edit on 7/10/2010 by eNumbra]



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