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Hospital security 'punches, tasers' nephew of Clarence Thomas

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posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:21 AM
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Irregardless of whether the person who was tased was related to anyone of any societal importance or not, one of the issues I have with this, is the guy wanted to leave. Sorry, but anyone who is conscious and coherent has the right to refuse medical treatment at any time they so choose. What could possibly throw a wrench into that is if he did indeed have present suicidal tendencies there could be concern of whether he was indeed a threat to himself. In which case he could be reasonably restrained.

The primary concern with this issue is the report that the hospital was aware of his history of epilepsy. That one thing disqualifies the use of a taser on the person.

Now we can hope that this incident will awaken some of the judges and justices in this country that there are indeed risks involved in the use of non-lethal force, and they should respond accordingly. And I sincerely hope that Justice Thomas will not attempt to use his position to accomplish a personal end.




posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:30 AM
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reply to post by Wayne60
 


I don't believe they call it "non-lethal" anymore for legal purposes. It's now called "less than lethal". Not sure of your area adopted the new semantics yet. The bottom line is it's the use of excessive force period. And as such we need better policies for the use of excessive force.

EDIT: I don't even believe private security should be allowed to tase people. That's assault with a weapon in my mind as they aren't representatives of the law.

Like you said though, even if it was police. It should be common sense electricity + epilepsy = high risk of seizure.

I'm not even a doctor, but I play one on tv. xD

[edit on 11-7-2010 by mryanbrown]



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by Wayne60
 


Having worked in a few Louisiana hospitals, people suspected of suicide, are not allowed to just get up and walk out of the place, until they are interviewed.

I worked in Tangipahoa parish, and the rule there, is that the coroner's office is usually notified first, and then they will recommend the course of treatment for the person, and why type of facility or Dr. they then have to see. In other words, the patient has lost any rights to decide for themselves, and better cooperate, even if they are a nephew of somebody famous.

Unless you want to be treated like crap in Louisiana, don't try to kill yourself, or if you do, make sure you will actually die, because otherwise, you are in for some living hell for a few days!

www.dhh.louisiana.gov...



f you are a relative or concerned friend, and you believe a person to be harmful to themselves or others and/or unable to function due to possible psychosis or a severe psychiatric problem and....



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 08:03 AM
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Man! Is this the standard of healthcare that we can expect under the Obama Administration?


— Doc Velocity



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 08:04 AM
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reply to post by Blanca Rose
 


McCarthyism witch hunt laws. Guilty upon hearsay. Denied the right to freedom without trial. And then given a seizure for lack of common sense.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 08:08 AM
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reply to post by mryanbrown
 


Sad, but true in Louisiana. I guess the point is to make sure the person is no longer a danger to themselves, or to other people.

Before they can be let out, that is just the way it is in Louisiana, so they need to cooperate if they want out, even if it is only suspected.

Believe me, I've seen plenty of suicide attempts actually end up tethered to either a gurney or a chair until the coroner arrives to interview them. They will also have either a policeman, or a security guard posted right in the room, or right outside the door, and they don't take any whining, or lack to cooperate from the patient.

edit typo



[edit on 11-7-2010 by Blanca Rose]



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 08:11 AM
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reply to post by Blanca Rose
 


I know, I believe all states have similar laws requiring minimum observation time.

It just reeks of more government interference.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 11:51 AM
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reply to post by Blanca Rose
 


Thank you for your insight. I had thought that since he had apparently exhibited some suicidal behavior that he could indeed be restrained. Most places, I think, have that policy in place.

I am a little curious though. You said a coroner is called to do the interview on patients who are suicidal. Not all coroners have medical qualifications, shall I assume that LA's do?

Edit to correct wording

[edit on 11-7-2010 by Wayne60]



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