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Ancient Egyptian Double Tomb Unearthed Near Cairo

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posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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I just came across this on the BBC website , there's not much detail but they have video of artifacts and amazingly well preserved , vividly coloured Hieroglyphs.

Egyptian archaeologists unveiled a newly-unearthed double tomb with vivid wall paintings in the ancient necropolis of Saqqara near Cairo. The tomb includes two false doors with colourful paintings depicting the two people buried there, a father and a son who served as heads of the royal scribes. The inscription dates the double tomb to the 6th dynasty (2374-2191BC), which marked the beginning of the decline of the Old Kingdom, also known as the age of pyramids. Zahi Hawass, Egyptian chief archaeologist, said that this could be the start for uncovering a vast cemetery in the area.

Zahi Hawass, said the new finds were "the most distinguished tombs ever found from the Old Kingdom," because of their "amazing colors."

The false door of the unearthed tomb of Shendwas, father of Khonsu who both served as heads of the royal scribes during the Old Kingdom, is decorated with a painting depicting the owner sitting at a sacrifice table


View of one of two rock-hewn painted Old Kingdom tombs recently discovered at Saqqara necropolis


A collection of some of the objects inside the tombs at Saqqara necropolis, south of Cairo


news.bbc.co.uk...
www.dailymail.co.uk...














[edit on 8-7-2010 by gortex]




posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 04:59 PM
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Thank you for posting this, OP! S&F for you.


This is most interesting! Such superb preservation: every time a new tomb is found it makes wonder what else still lies hidden in that part of the world. With so many thousands of years of civilization, coupled with their belief systems, I expect there are still many breathtaking discoveries to be made. (That's one reason why Ancient Egypt has been one of my main areas of interest for many years. So much still remains to be discovered.)

In a few days or so I hope to have more time to get back on this thread and discuss things further. By then maybe other members will have some good comments to add.

Thank you once again!

Mike



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 05:12 PM
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Awesome find thanks for posting.

looking through the pictures (thanks for embedding), the last one i find very curious.

bottem row furthest right :

i see what to me looks like a dolls head, using the boot print(?) as a referance for scale im guessing its 3 inches tall or so. i say a doll head and not a statue because to me it looks like protruding from the neck is a ball socket that would presumably fit into a neck peice allowing for movement(wishful thinking?)

also im wondering if any of our ATS scholors could explain to me what the objects are in the last picture, bottem row, first three items from the left?

S+F

~meathead



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 05:12 PM
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Double post..sigh ..sorry


~meathead

[edit on 8-7-2010 by Mike Stivic]



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 05:39 PM
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reply to post by JustMike
 




post by JustMike
I expect there are still many breathtaking discoveries to be made.

There is one thing that I am waiting for them to discover and that is the hall of records , if it indeed exists that would be truly eyeopening and would answer a whole host of questions about the Egyptians and their technology .



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 05:53 PM
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This is very interesting,
First picture seems to show a seated person beside a table, and both table and chair are quite stylised and also modern but different to one another. The plinth mounted table with what appears to be a single column support is especially so, but then the style all goes to pot with the dirty great object sitting on the table, whatever that is...looks like a telly! that's sounds familiar. Thanks for the post.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 06:00 PM
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Those colors are pretty amazing. It is also amazing at this day and age they are still discovering stuff in the area! Nice find.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 06:04 PM
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reply to post by gortex
 


S&F for your efforts friend great pics!
2nd



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 07:31 PM
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I still have problems with that table, described as sacrificial, and whatever is supposed to be sitting on it...not an oversized telly after all! mea culpa!

It's hard to know if there were actually sacrifices in that period, and harder to know exactly what a sacrificial table looked like, or indeed if such a device was even used and in what way. This link might help to add to the confusion,
goddesschess.blogspot.com...

Then there is Zahi Hawass, a contraversial figure to be sure,

en.wikipedia.org...

Then there is other stuff, like who exactly were the ancient Egyptians, and in contrast to Howass's view, the latest bust of an ancient Egyptian circa 2002 look at the image on the extreme right near the bottom, a shade like Obama don't you think.. made before Obama.

www.manuampim.com...

Just more stuff to think about.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 07:37 PM
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Wow, that's fantastic.

Although Hawass is lying about it being an amazing find, not nearly as amazing as what's under the Sphinx's right paw.

In any case it's still a great find, I don't think I've see anything that wasn't "restored" be that colorful and vivid.

S&F.

~Keeper



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 07:39 PM
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Awesome!

I am amazed at the vibrant color that remains in this tomb, and the beauty of the artifacts.

It seems Egypt, is a never ending source of dead people! How is it our population is so large, yet, we find so many dead people in Egypt?

I think that in past, the population was huge, and, we think back then, there could not have been so many people.

Mummies have been used ground up, as medicine, and also to fuel trains, among many other uses!


www.angelfire.com...


Mummies used to be used to cure illnesses a few hundred years ago. A medicine called "mummy" was used as a cheaper, more readily available substitute for asphalt, another popular medicine of the time. "Mummy" was supposed to stop bleeding, and was used for fractures, paralysis, epilepsy, coughs, nausea, poisoning, and liver and spleen disorders. Other strange uses for mummies include some of the following:



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by gortex
 


My first thought,

I wonder if the false door is really false?

Even if it isnt real, still a great find, makes ya wonder what else is left to find.



posted on Jul, 9 2010 @ 01:31 AM
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The condition of that tomb and artifacts is astounding! The only time I can remember seeing anything of that quality of preservation was Tutankhamen's tomb.

@polarwarrior: The 'false door' probably is false; it's a common feature in Egyptian burial places. I think the idea was that the spirit of the deceased went through the false door to travel to the afterlife.



posted on Jul, 9 2010 @ 08:40 PM
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Originally posted by DragonsDemesne
The condition of that tomb and artifacts is astounding! The only time I can remember seeing anything of that quality of preservation was Tutankhamen's tomb.

@polarwarrior: The 'false door' probably is false; it's a common feature in Egyptian burial places. I think the idea was that the spirit of the deceased went through the false door to travel to the afterlife.


Zahi Hawass is hard to to take at face value, but he is in charge once again. Notwithstanding that, do the historical figures in the paintings add up as genuine? I am not so sure.



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 10:16 AM
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Originally posted by polarwarrior
reply to post by gortex
 

My first thought,

I wonder if the false door is really false?


Yes. Those are common features of Egyptian tombs. This is the portal that the soul comes through to receive the offerings from family and friends. Here's a nice (2 paragraphs) summary from the British Museum about these and how they changed over time:
www.britishmuseum.org...



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 10:22 AM
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Originally posted by Blanca Rose
It seems Egypt, is a never ending source of dead people! How is it our population is so large, yet, we find so many dead people in Egypt?


Because they had regular graveyards with grave offerings and chapels (rather than leaving bodies to the elements) -- and because Egypt as a nation has been around since 3200 BC or thereabouts. Any place with graveyards and tombs to protect the dead will yield a lot of bodies.

They had some very complex funeral practices.



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 10:31 AM
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Originally posted by smurfy
I still have problems with that table, described as sacrificial, and whatever is supposed to be sitting on it...not an oversized telly after all! mea culpa!

It's hard to know if there were actually sacrifices in that period, and harder to know exactly what a sacrificial table looked like, or indeed if such a device was even used and in what way. This link might help to add to the confusion,
goddesschess.blogspot.com...


"Offering table" is the term usually used here -- and you're seeing a "bare table top". If you look to the right of the "telly table" you will see (if you know what the art looks like) the leg of a bullock (which is size-adjusted in the painting to fit neatly over the other offerings) and under that, a jar (beer or wine), offering bread loaves (sort of breast-shaped), and then another jar that may represent perfumes or drink (beer or wine.)



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 10:44 AM
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Originally posted by Mike Stivic
i see what to me looks like a dolls head, using the boot print(?) as a referance for scale im guessing its 3 inches tall or so. i say a doll head and not a statue because to me it looks like protruding from the neck is a ball socket that would presumably fit into a neck peice allowing for movement(wishful thinking?)


Wistful thinking. It may be part of a statue OR the stopper for a jar. Can't tell from those pictures.


also im wondering if any of our ATS scholors could explain to me what the objects are in the last picture, bottem row, first three items from the left?


Those tablets are found in a number of tombs. I've seen them referred to by Petrie as "shawbatis" (ushabtis). In current Egyptology they're simply called tablets. The ones I've seen (not an exhaustive example) commemorate special things in the person's life (royal mummies will have the commemoratives carved on large scarabs).

I can't see enough of what's on them to even begin to make a guess. The two smaller ones COULD be gaming pieces (also a possibility) but the one on the farthest left is a commemorative tablet of some sort, judging from what I can see of the artwork.



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 11:05 AM
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Originally posted by smurfy
Zahi Hawass is hard to to take at face value, but he is in charge once again. Notwithstanding that, do the historical figures in the paintings add up as genuine? I am not so sure.


I don't see what there is to doubt. I can read the titles on the door frames and see that yes, both were scribes. I can read the names and see that Shendwa served the pharaoh Neferkare (Pepi II in our lists), putting the date at the 6th dynasty. The city name is also given but I'm in Florida right now (not Texas, where I live) so I don't have my books to translate the material. The bottom of the columns refer (I think) to festivals. There is a reference to the pyramid of Neferkare (they were his overseers) on the right hand side panel.

The style, titles, paint choices, etc, match 6th dynasty. So do the artifacts.

Not sure who the four figures on the bottom are. I thought at first they were the sons of Horus, but the inscriptions don't match. Alas, can't read much more than that.

Not sure why you'd think it wasn't real.



posted on Jul, 10 2010 @ 07:41 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd

Originally posted by smurfy
I still have problems with that table, described as sacrificial, and whatever is supposed to be sitting on it...not an oversized telly after all! mea culpa!

It's hard to know if there were actually sacrifices in that period, and harder to know exactly what a sacrificial table looked like, or indeed if such a device was even used and in what way. This link might help to add to the confusion,
goddesschess.blogspot.com...


"Offering table" is the term usually used here -- and you're seeing a "bare table top". If you look to the right of the "telly table" you will see (if you know what the art looks like) the leg of a bullock (which is size-adjusted in the painting to fit neatly over the other offerings) and under that, a jar (beer or wine), offering bread loaves (sort of breast-shaped), and then another jar that may represent perfumes or drink (beer or wine.)


I beg to differ, Sacrifice is in context if the pictures are as ancient as depicted and it is the link that describes it as "Sacrificial" not me. That it is in "fact" a "sacrificial offering table" might be a more accurate term. Yes, I did see the leg of something, and I thought cattle also, so a Bullock's leg is most likely correct. I'm not sure what you mean about the "bare tabletop" as that leaves the "Telly" unexplained, or an uneccessary object in the picture as the two dimensional picture of the table and chair alone would still show an empty tabletop. The obvious clarity of colours in the picture and the contrasts therein are suspect, and without any info on the actual pigments used they remain suspect.




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