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All the plants we can use as a WATER source.

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posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 07:38 AM
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Disclaimer:I am not the best speller,So please dont critize.

If you like to ask; How I got there?

Situation;

You have been wandering around in the wilderness without water for 2 days,but there are plants around you,

What are all the safe plants that would we could us as a water source and not be poisonous?

Off the top of my head I know of one most forget is a maple tree,

Can any of you help me with some other plants we could use?




posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 08:33 AM
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1 way is

If you have some plastic sheeting on you then you dig a hole in the ground, get as much green vegitation as you can fit, place a cup in the center, place the plastic sheet over the hole securing all the sides with earth to weigh it down and place a stone in the center on top of the sheet.

The plants will start to release moisture which will collect on the uinderside of the sheet, the stone weight creates a kind of funnel and the water drips down to the center and collects in the cup underneath.

All you do is sit back and wait for your cup doth runeth over!


Disclaimer: Does not work in sub zero conditions.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 09:11 AM
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There is of course the classic cactus scenario.

Not quite sure how you are to extract the water though.

Good luck!

-Sol



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 10:31 AM
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Maple sap has a high sugar content that can make you sick.

Sycamore trees can be tapped for almost pure water any time of year.

Grape vines hold water but you have to kill the vine to get it. Only cut them in extreme emergencies.

Thistles have a high water content. Peel the spiny skin and chew like celery.

Cactus have lots of water, particularly the barrel cactus. Some cacti are poisonous and/or hallucinogenic. I suggest you learn them before trying.

That's about it for the temperate zones, I'm sure there are many tropical plants that hold safe water. Anyone knowledgeable about them?

best bet is to ALWAYS carry water tabs or a filter with you. Also you can dig a hole anywhere you see succulent plants growing like ferns, jack in the pulpit etc, or dig a hole at least 10 feet away from any open water source and allow the sediment to settle.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 11:19 AM
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Originally posted by Master Shen long


Disclaimer: Does not work in sub zero conditions.



This made me laugh...very good disclaimer



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 12:39 PM
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reply to post by rtcctr
 


Yeah i will go with the guy that said to use a plastic sheet. I just want to add if you use the plastic sheet hole method you do not even need plants, it will get the moisture right out of the ground. Not that plants do not work they will speed up this process but are not required.
But if you are just wondering around in the wilderness you already did something wrong.



posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 02:22 PM
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After Maple trees, my first thought was birch sap. Not as thick as maple, less sugar.

Any plant that grows in a water source, the root system should provide plenty of water. However, if you are by a lake, why not use the lake water?

There are other vines in jungle areas that are known for holding water, but never been to or plan on being in a jungle, I havent done a whole lot of research.

I like to harp on this, and no one has ever mentioned if they have tried, but the very best plant to procure water is two small, green willow saplings. Hold one in each hand loosely, when they cross or dive towards the ground, you have found water. Dig, purify, and drink. Dowsing works, works very well. Give it a try sometime when wandering in the woods, or find a local dowser to show you ahead of time, so you can actually see it work. Dowsers are generally good, salt of the earth people that enjoy teaching others this skill.



posted on Jul, 9 2010 @ 03:33 PM
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If you just find a clean looking branch and tie a plastic bag about it, the plant will "cry" some water into the bag. Plants transpire moisture all day long. The plant the produces the most water is corn, but with the upright stalks, you would have to make a spout for the water to flow into a catch basin or bag. Digging holes sounds like a lot of work to me.



posted on Jul, 9 2010 @ 03:33 PM
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If you just find a clean looking branch and tie a plastic bag about it, the plant will "cry" some water into the bag. Plants transpire moisture all day long. The plant the produces the most water is corn, but with the upright stalks, you would have to make a spout for the water to flow into a catch basin or bag. Digging holes sounds like a lot of work to me.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 01:28 PM
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The solar still (plastic sheet method) is usually a very marginal source of water and will often use more water to make than it will produce.

Transpiration bags over branches work well for many plants, but be sure the plant is not toxic or it will poison your water. Where I live the best plants for this would be:

Willow
Sycamore
Eucalyptus

Willow, mule fat, sycamore are all indicators of ground water as well where you could dig down a few feet and get some murky goodness.

Following the topography to low areas helps when water is needed helps to find the indicator plants.



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