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Theodore Roosevelt warned of Shadow Government

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posted on Jul, 5 2010 @ 12:25 AM
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"Behind the ostensible government sits enthroned an invisible government owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people."

www.brainyquote.com...




What do you think about this? A president actually saying there is a shadow government is pretty much a huge shock!




posted on Jul, 5 2010 @ 12:28 AM
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and he betrayed the usa....i'm surprised at this. it's deep dodo when you are elected i bet...



posted on Jul, 5 2010 @ 12:33 AM
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okay wow, great find S&F for sure, i'd have to say I agree with him though!



posted on Jul, 5 2010 @ 12:48 AM
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I read something like that in a book called "Behold a Pale Horse" or something, it has to do with a pale horse, lol. Anyways the writer of it talks about Mount Weather, its in the south east, but thats where they are supposed to be. Like they arent elected, they are put in the spot, and are there untill they die or someone better comes along. Its pretty deep, but I wouldnt be suprised if the Gov't had this going on, it makes sense if you think about it, we got to war, someone the president gets killed, or Washington gets nuked, who takes over, the Shadow Govt. Its a backup plan, the Govt always has a backup plan, always.



posted on Jul, 5 2010 @ 12:55 AM
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I remember there was also an American general before Roosevelt, Who warned us for it.
And, lets not forget Kennedy.



posted on Jul, 5 2010 @ 01:52 AM
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I'm sure they both were talking about the military. I'm sure even the president is not on some need to know lists. If martial law is enacted, and the president is not part of the military industrial complex, just a few "changes of command" before someone who is or once was takes the helm.



posted on Jul, 5 2010 @ 02:20 PM
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President Dwight D. Eisenhower gave a farewell address in 1961 that included a similar warning:



A vital element in keeping the peace is our military establishment. Our arms must be mighty, ready for instant action, so that no potential aggressor may be tempted to risk his own destruction.

Our military organization today bears little relation to that known by any of my predecessors in peacetime, or indeed by the fighting men of World War II or Korea.

Until the latest of our world conflicts, the United States had no armaments industry. American makers of plowshares could, with time and as required, make swords as well. But now we can no longer risk emergency improvisation of national defense; we have been compelled to create a permanent armaments industry of vast proportions. Added to this, three and a half million men and women are directly engaged in the defense establishment. We annually spend on military security more than the net income of all United States corporations.

This conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience. The total influence -- economic, political, even spiritual -- is felt in every city, every State house, every office of the Federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources and livelihood are all involved; so is the very structure of our society.

In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.

We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.

Akin to, and largely responsible for the sweeping changes in our industrial-military posture, has been the technological revolution during recent decades.

In this revolution, research has become central; it also becomes more formalized, complex, and costly. A steadily increasing share is conducted for, by, or at the direction of, the Federal government.

Today, the solitary inventor, tinkering in his shop, has been overshadowed by task forces of scientists in laboratories and testing fields. In the same fashion, the free university, historically the fountainhead of free ideas and scientific discovery, has experienced a revolution in the conduct of research. Partly because of the huge costs involved, a government contract becomes virtually a substitute for intellectual curiosity. For every old blackboard there are now hundreds of new electronic computers.

The prospect of domination of the nation's scholars by Federal employment, project allocations, and the power of money is ever present – and is gravely to be regarded.

Yet, in holding scientific research and discovery in respect, as we should, we must also be alert to the equal and opposite danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientific-technological elite.

It is the task of statesmanship to mold, to balance, and to integrate these and other forces, new and old, within the principles of our democratic system – ever aiming toward the supreme goals of our free society.


It is said that Eisenhower's intent was to use the term "military-congressional-industrial complex," but because of political pressure, he dropped the "congressional" part. This speech seems to have popularized the pre-existing term "military-industrial complex."

Link to full speech.

[edit on Jul 05, 2010 by Hadrian]

[edit on Jul 05, 2010 by Hadrian]

[edit on Jul 05, 2010 by Hadrian]

[edit on Jul 05, 2010 by Hadrian]



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