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Couple Accused of Stealing $2M From Veterans

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posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 09:26 PM
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Couple Accused of Stealing $2M From Veterans


www.linksalpha.com

Correct Link


A Houston couple was indicted on allegations that they conspired to steal $2 million from military veterans, MyFoxHouston.com reported.

Former lawyer Joe Phillips, 71, and Dorothy Phillips, 70, turned themselves in to authorities on Tuesday after a Houston grand jury slapped the couple with a list of charges that include conspiracy, misappropriation of a fiduciary, making materially false statements to a federal agency and tax fraud.

(visit the link for the full news article)



[edit on 7/1/2010 by semperfortis]




posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 09:26 PM
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This is disgusting and unfortunately, seemingly typical of lawyers. Many lawyers always seem to be scheming someone or defrauding others, it's what they do. However, this couple sure takes the cake, if they are in fact guilty.

So, veterans who are deemed incapable or incompetent to manage their own money, fell victim to the greed of these monsters, who probably never contributed anything to society, other than head-aches. If they are guilty, they are the scum of the Earth, IMO.

I have always said that laws are far too complicated if lawyers are needed. Talk about a profession that only burdens society by complicating things so much, that you have to pay exorbitant fees to complicate them more and then compromise. I am convinced that most lawyers don't uphold the law, rather they confuse it so much that a compromise has to be given that doesn't even conform to the legal standard. It makes the law pointless and the people subject to extortion in light of said pointless laws. It's like a parasite, feeding off of an already corrupt system. Of course, there are good lawyers out there (like in everything else), but that doesn't make me reconsider my stance on whether lawyers are a benefit or detriment to society. Does this mean that I blame someone for wanting to be a lawyer? Absolutely not. Like my father always said, in order to make it in this country, you have to find your place at the trough and drink from it, otherwise you won't eat.

These lawyers happened to do something clearly illegal but most lawyers will just confuse the law so much that technically, their schemes won't be considered illegal. It is the anti-thesis of "natural law" and a system to which the public as a whole can and will benefit. I can only assume that this lawyer, got so comfortable with screwing people, that the line became so blurry that he couldn't even differentiate between acceptable fraud and unacceptable fraud.

--airspoon


www.linksalpha.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by airspoon
 


Hey thanks airspoon; I saw this a few minutes ago on DrudgeReport. Simply put, no longer can we be suprised by the actions of "everyday" people. People are animals.

Makes me shake with anger as these men and women of armed forces are those who need and deserve help the most.

ColoradoJens

[edit on 1-7-2010 by ColoradoJens]



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 09:47 PM
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As a 100% disabled veteran, I find it hard to believe such persons could pull off such a feat. The paperwork is knee deep to get these benefits. Something is not adding up.

Hardly any veterans utililize attorneys. Mostly because the lawyers make nothing from a veteran (not worth their while). Google it. It's true. Go to Veterans Benefit Network and you will find how hard it is for veterans to get their due.

It took me nearly 20 years to get my full benefits. It is very hard to screw the Veterans Health Administration.

I'm afraid this post is a bit on the fringe. No offense OP. Just laying out the truth.



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 10:01 PM
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reply to post by brilab45
 


I too am a 100% disabled veteran. It is much easier than you think. For instance, you can sign a POA (power of attorney), as many do with the VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars). For those deemed incompetent (and without a family), a POA is automatic, going to someone appointed such as the attorney in question. To me, this is all too believable. Not only have I gone through the system myself, but I also oversaw many of my soldiers going through it before being discharged.

Again, if you are deemed incompetent, you are going to have an attorney appointed over your case. Also, your case probably utilized an attorney and you didn't even know it.

--airspoon


[edit on 1-7-2010 by airspoon]



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 10:02 PM
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reply to post by airspoon
 


really how would I find that out?

I am fighting them and have been for 3 years



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 10:08 PM
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reply to post by ripcontrol
 


How would you find what out? Whether an attorney has been involved with your case? Well, I'm not exactly sure how the VA benefits work, as opposed to the medical board but I'm sure that attornies are used in deciding your disability rating.

--airspoon



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 10:15 PM
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Originally posted by airspoon
reply to post by brilab45
 


I too am a 100% disabled veteran. It is much easier than you think. For instance, you can sign a POA (power of attorney), as many do with the VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars). For those deemed incompetent (and without a family), a POA is automatic, going to someone appointed such as the attorney in question. To me, this is all too believable. Not only have I gone through the system myself, but I also oversaw many of my soldiers going through it before being discharged.

Again, if you are deemed incompetent, you are going to have an attorney appointed over your case. Also, your case probably utilized an attorney and you didn't even know it.

--airspoon


[edit on 1-7-2010 by airspoon]


I'm 70% disabled and rated 100% IU. I had to have proof upon proof to get my benefits. Those that con the system must be quite saavy. Of course that pee's me off to end. Still find it hard to screw the system. Hope they fry.



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 10:23 PM
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Originally posted by airspoon
reply to post by brilab45
 


I too am a 100% disabled veteran. It is much easier than you think. For instance, you can sign a POA (power of attorney), as many do with the VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars). For those deemed incompetent (and without a family), a POA is automatic, going to someone appointed such as the attorney in question. To me, this is all too believable. Not only have I gone through the system myself, but I also oversaw many of my soldiers going through it before being discharged.

Again, if you are deemed incompetent, you are going to have an attorney appointed over your case. Also, your case probably utilized an attorney and you didn't even know it.

--airspoon


[edit on 1-7-2010 by airspoon]


I am also a 100% disabled veteran. and do research for other veterans.

If you have to sign a POA (power of attorney) you can limit the POA just by writing on it the limits to maters at hand.
you do not have and should not sign a open power of attorney.

I hold the POA for my father with alzheimer's (he is also 100% disabled veteran) and the VA has tried twice to get me to sign over his POA to them but i have only signed over just what was needed for his care. the rest i still hold.



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 10:26 PM
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reply to post by ANNED
 


May God bless you. I mean that truely.



posted on Jul, 1 2010 @ 10:34 PM
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reply to post by ANNED
 


What your doing is smart, obviously and especially in light of this article. Unfortunately, for those who do sign a POA over to the VA or those who don't have family, the VA assigns those cases to an appointee. However, there is an option that many don't know about and can be in lou of signing a POA to the VA and that is the VFW. The VFW is run by other veterans, who generally care about who they are working for. The VFW will go to bat for veterans through the VA system. The only thing about the VFW, is that you have to have been disabled due to war (I believe). Sadly, the VA is fraught with politics and the greed of those who run it and contract through it. It is a nightmare and a blimish for America's veterans.

--airspoon



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