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Survival tips for wimps

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posted on Jul, 7 2010 @ 06:14 AM
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Your most important tool is information .
How do you gather the information you need to accomplish your goal ?
Don't rely on Cell Phones they are known to be unreliable at the best of times . Natural disaster wise in my local area the worst case scenario is an earthquake because you get no warnings and services such as running water could be knocked out and old buildings destroyed .

Cheers xpert11.




posted on Jul, 8 2010 @ 08:43 AM
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reply to post by Daughter2
 


The adults under your care probably need some specific supplies in their day-to-day care. It would probably be a good idea to have those goods stored in ziplock or other watertight containers and keep it all in some sort of travel bag. Rotate your stocks, particulary meds.... FIFO -- first in, first out. It's difficult to stay in a constant state of readiness, and takes a bit more work to keep shuffling these supplies, but might tend toward gaining you peace of mind. Don't forget the important documents for all of you -- ziplock them as well.

Hard to speculate without having an idea of the climate in which you live or whether it's a city or more urban area. Many cities have assistance services for evac of those with disabilities. As others have said, your best bet might be to stay at home -- depending on the nature of the disaster -- unless of course, the probability of it being more unsafe to do so. For example, a person living close or on the coast in a single-story structure in the approach of a hurricane or typhoon would probably choose to evacuate.

If the need to evacuate is a definate possibility, you might want to have a practice drill. It will probably be very difficult, but extremely educational in the event you ever have to actually do it. I keep a written hurricane plan that evolves each year. We rarely stick exactly to the plan, but it keeps us from forgetting to do something, and also allows us to incorporate the lessons learned from our response to the storm.

Very general advice, and probably all things you've already thought of. If you'd like to give us some more info (without giving away your location), we'd have more to work with -- things like the situations/disasters you might need to respond to, general climate, proximity to known potential problem areas (earthquake areas, coast, fire hazards, volcano, flood, etc.)

all best



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