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What happens when Art imitates Life in Mexico's brutal Drug War: Famous Mexican musician murdered

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posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 11:09 AM
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At around the same time as a prominent Mexican gubernatorial candidate was assassinated in gangland shooting.

Mexican Candidate for Governor Is Assassinated

A famous entertainer suffered a similar fate. He was a musician who chronicled the exploits of the Mexican drug barons in his songs known as "narcocorridos."

Here is one of this songs.



Sergio "El Shaka" Vega was gunned down in the Mexican state of Sinaloa on his way to a performance.



No doubt killed by the same men who he so graciously enriched himself by glamorizing in his odes to the shady and brutal underworld of Mexico.

Mexican singer El Shaka killed after denying his murder


Only hours before the shooting, he told the entertainment website La Oreja that reports of his murder had been mistaken.

"It's happened to me for years now, someone tells a radio station or a newspaper I've been killed, or suffered an accident," Mr Vega said.

"And then I have to call my dear mum, who has heart trouble, to reassure her," he explained.


To put it simply, when you play with fire you are bound to get burned. Or in the case of Senor Vega, a body riddled with lead and a funeral. Perhaps, his music was bringing to much attention to his subject matter, and they had to silence him. In criminal circles it is said silence is golden. Perhaps, another genre of music would have been a better alternative than music glamorizing thugs and bandits?


[edit on 29-6-2010 by Jakes51]




posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:04 PM
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From the BBC article it sounds like a pride thing. When a singer exalts the exploits of one cartel or drug lord the rivals see it as a slap in the face. Maybe they see it as a sign of allegiance to that gang and the murder as the killing of a rival gang member?

I don't think it is to ensure silence. I think it is to draw attention and instill fear.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:19 PM
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Originally posted by MikeNice81
From the BBC article it sounds like a pride thing. When a singer exalts the exploits of one cartel or drug lord the rivals see it as a slap in the face. Maybe they see it as a sign of allegiance to that gang and the murder as the killing of a rival gang member?

I don't think it is to ensure silence. I think it is to draw attention and instill fear.


You have brought up a good point and I never looked at that way. It seems probable, and he may have been like a mascot or cheerleader for one drug cartel? Through his songs the others felt insulted, and indirectly bringing undue attention to them. He may as well have been like any other rival in gang warfare? Very interesting take on it.



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