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Choosing healthy foods now called a mental disorder

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posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 07:26 PM
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Ugh, when will the nanny gestarpo quit? I choose healthy foods because I don't want to become a 20 stone lump, simple. I do enjoy a treat, but everything in my diet is in moderation. I choose the healthier foods because I like how they look, I like how they taste, I enjoy eating colourful foods, not a plate with a lump of horrible mush and a piece of grey, processed 'meat'.

In the UK, well over half the population are obese, the rate at which diabetes is being diagnosed is almost at epidemic perportions, and health issues caused by being obese cost the NHS millions each year.

This MUST be just another page in big pharma's book of disorders/marketing ploys.

It's our fear of the words fat and obese that are making people fat and obese, we're now afraid to tell people they have a weight problem, because it's their right to have a weight problem blah blah blah, so I would hazard a guess that this is in there somewhere.



[edit on 29-6-2010 by The Chez]




posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 07:28 PM
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Originally posted by SaveThisWorld


Ah stop blaming others.

You eat what you eat. If YOU put on weight, it's because YOU ate to much. If you are unhealthy, it's because YOU didn't eat healthy enough and if YOU choose to eat one and not the other, then it's YOUR choice. Just don't shout your preaching gibberish at others.



I think you misinterpreted the opening post.

An attention to what you eat...in order to not put on weight or be to just be plain healthy...is being called a psychiatric illness.

It has nothing to do with personal responsibility. An ill understood macro process is being supposed in order to provide a foundation for further 'definitions, on a psychiatric level.

They are the ones preaching!



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 07:31 PM
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I actually agree. Buying consumer goods and checking all ingredients everytime can be labeled as a mental illness. If you were really into healthy diet you wouldn't be buying anything with a label on it. You wouldn't even want to buy "organic" foods but only those you grow yourself or your neighbours.

But see.. some of you would start to think about what soil it grows in, is it contaminated? what kind of rains fall on the fruits you eat, what kind of air it grows in, where did you buy your seeds from - if you have 2nd generation homegrown seeds were the plants maybe polinated with a genetically altered variety from a mile away? Well it's just the world we live in.

OH, you can't grow your own food? Well it's just the world we live in

The term healthy food is a joke in todays world


edit: added closing sentence


[edit on 29-6-2010 by globuser777]



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 08:14 PM
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Well I can chime in with some anecdotal evidence from Idaho.
Here, almost invariably when my wife or I order an entree that is vegetarian, the waitperson's response is, "You know there's no meat in that, right? Or if we order something sans meat we get the raised eyebrow or odd look. Forget about organics and the like. Even the sellers at the farmers market get a glassy look in their eyes when you ask about pesticides, GMO's, etc.

I'm LDS (Mormon) and a few years ago I was teaching a lesson in church to the men's class on "The Word of Wisdom." It's a health code, most of you should be somewhat familiar with it's more famous tenets: No drinking, no tobacco, etc etc.
What isn't so well followed is the advice on meat.

from scriptures.lds.org...

12 Yea, flesh also of beasts and of the fowls of the air, I, the Lord, have ordained for the use of man with thanksgiving; nevertheless they are to be used sparingly;
13 And it is pleasing unto me that they should not be used, only in times of winter, or of cold, or famine.
14 All grain is ordained for the use of man and of beasts, to be the staff of life, not only for man but for the beasts of the field, and the fowls of heaven, and all wild animals that run or creep on the earth; 15 And these hath God made for the use of man only in times of famine and excess of hunger.


That's 1 'pleases God to not use meat', 1 sparingly, and 2 separate example sets of "sparingly".

Sooo you can guess how that class went! lol. By and large, people don't want to hear anything that threatens their meaty diets!

Oh yeah, another neat conspiracy nugget for ya in the Word of Wisdom:

4 Behold, verily, thus saith the Lord unto you: In consequence of evils and designs which do and will exist in the hearts of conspiring men in the last days, I have warned you, and forewarn you, by giving unto you this word of wisdom by revelation—



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 08:25 PM
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AWESOME! Now I can collect money from the state by claiming I have a mental illness due to choosing only sustainable food groups. [This includes Beef,Corn,Wheat]. I guess that means almost ever damn product in ANY store right? What about the Farming community that sell stuff they grow. Are they the source of this mental disorder? No Star, this damn thread is 100% fictional.

[edit on 29-6-2010 by SneakAPeek]



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 08:37 PM
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Originally posted by MemoryShock
I think you misinterpreted the opening post.

An attention to what you eat...in order to not put on weight or be to just be plain healthy...is being called a psychiatric illness.

It has nothing to do with personal responsibility. An ill understood macro process is being supposed in order to provide a foundation for further 'definitions, on a psychiatric level.

They are the ones preaching!


Not really singling you out, Mem, and not saying anything that others in this thread haven't said, but in this case I think it's important to go past the source linked in the OP to it's source and watch how abstraction from the original context and selective quoting have twisted the story.

No one is saying that trying to eat healthy is a sign of mental illness in itself. What they are saying is that an obsession with eating healthy is a sign of mental illness that has different characteristics than other eating disorders and should be recognized as a possible issue.

I've known plenty of people who try to eat well, including many for whom it's an issue of major personal importance. I have known only a couple for whom it becomes an obsession that interferes with their life.

The need for a new diagnostic term for it is a tough call -- in my opinion, most specific diagnoses in this kind of fixation issue serve two purposes: first, to give doctors/psychologists a code so that insurance will cover treatment and second, to increase recognition of the problem in both the professional community and the general public so that it doesn't go untreated.

The first is a failing in our insurance systems, in my opinion. If a mental or physical issue is interfering with a person's life and is treatable, it shouldn't have to be named to be treated.

The second is more complex, and something of a two-edged sword.

edit: replace "one thing" with "a tough call" since I decided not to write as much as originally planned


[edit on 6/29/2010 by americandingbat]



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 08:51 PM
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Originally posted by ModernAcademia

Choosing healthy foods now called a mental disorder


www.naturalnews.com

and probably need some sort of chemical treatment involving powerful psychotropic drugs.


Crazy mind altering drugs I'm sure would make one MORE inclined to eat healthy. For example, force a heroic dose of psilocybin on the mentally ill healthy eating nut. Then force the subject to watch any number of documentaries take your pick, Food Inc., Supersize Me, The world According to Monsanto... The subject may be subject to involuntary bouts of fasting and or veganism.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 08:56 PM
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Originally posted by americandingbat
No one is saying that trying to eat healthy is a sign of mental illness in itself. What they are saying is that an obsession with eating healthy is a sign of mental illness that has different characteristics than other eating disorders and should be recognized as a possible issue.


I should probably state that I am guilty of over looking that caveat after having recognized it.

However...it should be stated that there is still a disconnect regarding how professionals continue to over emphasize specific aspects of obsession and create, after propagating them, not only a discordance in the professional world and how to diagnose (I have witnessed haphazard diagnosis) but how the public interprets them.

What of the psychological issues created from a hypochondriac enforcing their views on a family member (also witnessed, outside of the wonderful correlation to ATS banter...
).

While I believe that whatever a human decides to obsess on may give insight to a particular neurotransmitter/hormonal/experiential interplay that is ripe for attention and treatment (and treatment is where the money comes from), there is a point where there needs to be a bit of less emphasis.

The obsession needs to effect sociological interaction for it to be a mental illness. And I do wonder how often an over attention to healthy eating as it effects personal interactions correlates with the recent media movement of such.

I'm not necessarily calling out our professionals...but I think I may be concerned with specialized aspects and the lack of interplay between them...if that makes sense...

Edit/Spelling.

[edit on Tue, 29 Jun 2010 20:57:23 -0500 by MemoryShock]



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


This sounds like one of those all too common cases, where both sides are exaggerating.

I've worked with a person, who also suffers from other mental disorders like Bipolar disorder for nearly a decade. She makes no secret of her problems or treatments for it. It plagues her.

I think she would fit into this because with her its not trying to eat healthy, she has an actual phobia about it. If she reads on some crackpot site selling snake oil that something she has eaten causes a problem, she immediately develops that exact problem and runs to her MD. Which is doubly troubling because on the extremely rare occasion her problem is real, she then refuses to take her medication because her Doctor "might be poisoning her".

I'm here to tell you her insurance company would dump her if they could. She misses an average of six days a month for appointments for imaginary illnesses. I am her employer by the way. A very tolerant one.

Again, I think both sides of this conversation are exaggerating just to create the conversation. We all know there are people who's fanaticism reaches the level of a mental aberration.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 09:25 PM
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reply to post by VneZonyDostupa
 


This is the history of psychiatry. From begining to today. It's a long documentary but let me tell you what you learn in it is amazing.. They actually speak to psychiatrist and interview some.. Even they admit there are no tests that prove you have a "chemical imbalance"

The documentary can be found Here

Take the time to watch it.. You'll learn alot about the history and present day psychiatry. On how the state can come and get your children on the advice of a psychiatrist and put them in institutions. Also on how there is alot of insurance fraud.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 09:27 PM
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Uh, hey Op...I disagree with you. We're talking extremes here...cause you buy something healthy doesn't mean your sick in the head.
Take a look at the disorder in action and see why eating healthy can fit the criteria of mental disorder. And btw this isn't anything new...it's just that it hasn't been recognized/written in the DSM.

Check this out, and then if you will say what you think about it.








posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by Grossac
reply to post by VneZonyDostupa
 


This is the history of psychiatry. From begining to today. It's a long documentary but let me tell you what you learn in it is amazing.. They actually speak to psychiatrist and interview some.. Even they admit there are no tests that prove you have a "chemical imbalance"

The documentary can be found Here

Take the time to watch it.. You'll learn alot about the history and present day psychiatry. On how the state can come and get your children on the advice of a psychiatrist and put them in institutions. Also on how there is alot of insurance fraud.


I asked for a source, not a documentary with a point to prove. Please provide documentation of the events/accusations you listed. thanks.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 09:36 PM
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I have to agree with this. Orthorexia nervosa is a mental disorder.

However, I'd prefer to call it (along with many other mental illnesses) immaturity.

Its coined because some people take healthy eating over the top. You can ingest too many vitamins, and your body does need cholesterol, fat, etc. and some people try to omit these things completely from their diet. It's not healthy, and not natural.

I almost see it along the same level of immaturity as vegetarians. Eating nothing but veggies isn't healthy, which is why many vegetarians take protein supplements and other things their body is lacking. Many vegetarians eat nothing but veggies because of the humane animal rights stuff. I'm not a PETA member, but I absolutely LOVE animals, yet I also eat them. If vegetarians had an understanding that plants also process data, information, and communicate with one another, then they wouldnt kill and eat them, either.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 09:41 PM
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Originally posted by ModernAcademia


ARGHHHHHHH
I am so angry right now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

They are telling me that wanting to eat healthy is a mental disorder?


That's not how i read the information. They are saying that OBSESSING over what you eat can create an eating disorder. Which is true.

I was strict raw vegan for many years, and I know first hand this is true--From my own experience, as well as watching others around me on a similar path. I developed severe eating issues that I am still addressing to this day.

What I found was that creating boxes around 'good' and 'bad' food can be very damaging over time. Sure, focus on eating good things. But dont OBSESS. And remember, a lot of what people think is 'good' food is often just a new kind of poison. Soy being but one of many examples.

Just enjoy what you eat, give thanks!



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 09:44 PM
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Originally posted by MemoryShock
However...it should be stated that there is still a disconnect regarding how professionals continue to over emphasize specific aspects of obsession and create, after propagating them, not only a discordance in the professional world and how to diagnose (I have witnessed haphazard diagnosis) but how the public interprets them.


This topic is part of what I decided not to add to my last post, mostly because I think that it's a really important issue worth addressing and I'm so disgusted by how misleading the title and OP of this thread are that I wasn't sure I wanted to have the conversation here


There's so many levels at play: the skill and training of the diagnostician, the value of the diagnosis itself (basically, is it useful in directing treatment options), the specificity and usefulness of the diagnostic criteria, the broader context of the patient's life, how well the mass media interprets the diagnosis and criteria for popular consumption, how that interpretation interplays with other issues of the day, and how we view "mental disorders".



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 09:52 PM
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reply to post by americandingbat
 

Fair enough; my apologies for contributing to the chicken little aspect of this story...



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 10:06 PM
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The quote "over attention to healthy eating" keeps popping up. Could it be that it is not a simple endeavor to eat healthy in America.

One who chooses to modify there diet for for better health encounters roadblocks at every turn.

GMO products
Added sugar
sodium chloride
processed grains
hormones and antibiotic
perservatives and colorants
etc.

All of these products have risks when used excessively. The problem is 95% of the products available contain these ingredients. I can see how obsession could be attributed to someone trying to clean up their diet and also the apathy associated with not being able to change your diet without a complete overall of ones current routines.

A new food pyramid is about to be published with revised guidelines. A heavier focus on vegetables, fruits, unrefined grains and nuts will be advised. How will we make that transition? These are not shelf stable, highly profitable products that are likely going to be pushed at us in magazines and television ads. How would fast food restuarants include whole foods on there $.99 menu? I could just bring an apple from home vs the silly putty nugget which I have no idea how to make.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 11:15 PM
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Hey I got my own lemon tree. I don't buy lemons because of where they come from and the pesticides they use. Guess I have a mental illness.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 11:40 PM
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This sin't saying hat all healthy eaters are suffering from a mental disease. I's saying that people can get compulsive about it. And that it a legitimate disorder just like an unhealthy compulsion with anything else.


Don't be fooled into thinking all natural products are better than conventional processed foods, because that isn't true. Natural doesn't imply healthy.

Do you know what chemicals are allowed while still having a food labled organic?

Fertilizers:
Magnesium sulfate, iron sulfate, copper sulfate, zinc sulfate, manganese sulfate, sulfuric and phosphoric
acids (added to liquid fish fertilizers), basic slag.
Pesticides:
Copper sulfate, copper oxychloride, copper hydroxide, potassium permanganate, mineral oils, calcium
polysulfide.
Animal Feed :
Monocalcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate, magnesium sulfate, ferrous (II) carbonate, ferrous (II)
sulphate monohydrate, calcium iodate anhydrous, calcium iodate hexahydrate, potassium iodide, cobaltous
(II) sulphate monohydrate and/or heptahydrate, basic cobaltous (II) carbonate monohydrate, copper (II )
oxide, basic copper (II) carbonate monohydrate, copper (II) sulphate pentahydrate, manganese (II)
carbonate, manganous oxide, manganic oxide, manganous (II) sulfate, mono-and/or tetrahydrate zinc
carbonate, zinc oxide, zinc sulphate mono- and/or hepta-hydrate, ammonium molybdate, sodium
molybdate, sodium selenate, sodium selenite ascorbic acid, d-alphatocopheryl succinate, cyanocoblamin,
pyridoxine hydrochloride, niacinamide.

Not saying organic is bad. There are some very common misconceptions about i.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 11:40 PM
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Originally posted by ModernAcademia
I was speaking to a friend from Kentucky last week, he just started an organic farm and he was telling me that him eating raw fruits and vegetables is increasing his focus and thinking capabilities.


Truly eating right, can do SO much more in addition to increasing mental capabilities. I've been on the paleo (hunter gatherer) diet for over three months now, and my asthma, allergies, anxiety and insomnia have disappeared. Completely. My energy levels have skyrocketed, and although I've pretty much always worked out, I lost all the stubborn belly fat that would never seem to go away, in 3 weeks. I challenge anybody here who suffers from inflammatory diseases like allergies, arthritis, etc., as well as diabetes, anxiety, and just about any other disease that popped up with civilization and agriculture, to give this way of eating a try for a month. Anybody who really gives it a shot, won't go back. The pharmaceutical companies have lost all the money they were getting from me, as well as many others who have adopted this lifestyle change. That's probably why they're trying to scare people out of healthy eating, lol. If this is a mental illness, then I don't want to be cured.

altmed.creighton.edu...



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