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Why evacuations in the Gulf WILL be necessary, and soon: poison gas clouds

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posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 08:57 PM
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Ok, let's think this through:

Under what conditions would the Gulf or any portion of it be evacuated?

Oil itself wouldn't seem to factor into an immediate evac order. If oil causes a need to evacuate it would be slow, an acknowledgement that the local environment is crappy to live in and will stay that way for a long time.

So it would have to be a gas emergency of some sort.

H2S, methane, and benzine would be the culprits, along with whatever COREXIT has in it.

Those gasses are heavier than air.

To represent a danger a cloud of gas would have to be something like four or five miles across and some hundred feet or so above sea level.

What is important to remember here is the concept of phase states...

Holy crap! 2+2 just equalled 4, and the penny dropped.





en.wikipedia.org...

Damn, damn, damn...ok, gas plumes have beem located in the depths at concentrations of up to one million times normal, right?

These clouds have been measured up to 12 x 12 miles x 600 feet thick.

What happens when currents, winds whatever, pushes such a subsea cloud into shallower water?

The gas will be pushed up into the atmosphere is what.

How much warning? I'm not sure, but hours, maybe, enough to need evac plans.

I'd be extremely watchful of winds and currents right now.

In fact, I think it's time to get out of Dodge.


Just posted this as a reply in another thread and think it needs broader dissemination.

I'd really, really, really love for this to be debunked, but it's physics, pure and simple.

[edit on 28-6-2010 by apacheman]




posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:03 PM
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There are probably 30 threads like this already...



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:05 PM
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You have already started a thread like this. How many more do you plan to start concerning "evacuation".

It's tripe.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:12 PM
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reply to post by Alethea
 


.... Well not exactly.

I live here on the MS Coast and have friends in Law Enforcement. 3 cities on the coast here had a visit on friday by Dept of the Interior. They brought along scientist and told them that Forced Evacuations of the gulf coast are possible.

I tried today to confirm but either they don't know or they won't talk.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by SWCCFAN
 

That's scary, SWCCFAN. Please keep us posted if you learn more. If such an evacuation occurs we're all going to help out, right? I'm a long way from the Gulf but my household is willing to help should there be a lot of people displaced.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:24 PM
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Because each seperate thread goes from general to more specific as the information develops.

What I presented a possibility in earlier threads is more of a certainty at this point.

Numerous subsea gas clouds have been confirmed by different university research teams. This amount of gas has never been in as localized an area in all of human history that we know of, so thinking about it necessarily means following different thought paths until they lead to something substantial or fade into nothing.

Over these last weeks I've learned an awful lot more about these things than I ever wanted to, and now I can see the the problem sort of multi-dimensionally.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

The aspect that I am bringing to this thread is not speculative: this is set in concrete and WILL happen sometime over the next month or so. One of these subsea gas clouds will be pushed ashore and WILL kill pretty much everything in its path.

This is my warning to anyone who wants to pay attention:

1. Get your young and elderly at least 20 miles from the Gulf, now. I pick twenty miles based on known subsea gas cloud sizes and assume that winds would attenuate such clouds to safe levels in that distance.

2. Acquire and keep H2S-proof gas masks for each person who stays.

3. Get H2S warning devices for your neighborhoods: pitch in and make sure everyone can hear them when they sound.

4. Keep your SCUBA tanks full. Get some off Craigslist if you don't have any.

5. Pay close attention to onshore winds and currents and be alert to any updates on slicks, and gas cloud locations.

6. Create an airtight room, or as close as you can to one, with oxygen bottles. With luck you'd only be in danger for a few minutes or hours at most.
Good luck, and pray you're on the edge of the cloud.

http://(nolink)/2010/06/22/bps-lies-about-methane-and-oil-plumes-exposed/

[edit on 28-6-2010 by apacheman]

[edit on 28-6-2010 by apacheman]



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:28 PM
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reply to post by apacheman
 


So if I understand you correctly, you are saying that methane is heavier than air and .....water?
It just seems to me that if there was a huge "cloud" of gas just hanging out under water and not rising like you say, then you are basically putting forth that methane is heavier than water, or at least similar.
Sorry not buying it.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:35 PM
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Ok

Methane's molecular weight is 16.043.

Oxygen's molecular weight is 32.

Nitrogen is a major component of the air we breathe too. Its weight is 28.02.

Now tell me if I'm crazy here, but I'd say methane is lighter.

...And we all know water is heavier than air. At least I hope we all do.


So again, I say I am not buying your explanation.

[edit on 28/6/2010 by Chamberf=6]



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:42 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
reply to post by apacheman
 


So if I understand you correctly, you are saying that methane is heavier than air and .....water?
It just seems to me that if there was a huge "cloud" of gas just hanging out under water and not rising like you say, then you are basically putting forth that methane is heavier than water, or at least similar.
Sorry not buying it.


I don't recollect anything in the OP that said methane is heavier than water, that's called a strawman arguement. There is massive deposits of Methane hydrates in the Gulf Reigon, and there is a massive amount of methane dissolved in the water held there by the water pressure and temperatures. Carbon Dioxide isn't heavier than coca cola is it, so why does it spew out?


OP check around on google, I read a little on some studies that talked about low pressure weather systems causing marked increase in methane releases from swamps and wetlands, and I think one of the major concerns is that a tropical system, which is a massive area of extreme low pressure, can cause a pretty sudden sublimation of gases.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:48 PM
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reply to post by Chamberf=6
 


No, methane is heavier than air; it is dissolved in the water in the form of a cloud that varies in concentration from 1,000 times normal at the edges and up to 1,000,000 times normal in the center.

Several of these gas plumes have been found, some up to 15 miles long and 12 across, and from 600 tp 1,000 feet thick.

As a gas plume is pushed into shallower water the gas will concentrate to the eventul point of evaporating out of the water and form a cloud that is partially dissolved in the water and partially hanging in the atmosphere above the subsea component.

These clouds will be temporary as surface winds will dissipate them as long as the cloud isn't steadily pushed ashore by subsea currents. However, It is inevitable that some pockets will be dense enough to be extremely dangerous, turning regular living on the Gulf into a lethal crapshoot.

The gas won't be everywhere all the time, but puffs and pockets as various gas plumes get pushed around.

[edit on 28-6-2010 by apacheman]



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:54 PM
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reply to post by apacheman
 


Yes it is diffused in the water. But when/if it gets expelled from the water in mass amounts, you still say it is heavier than air? Perhaps you could give me a source for that, please.

Methane leaks from several places in the ocean floor, like the Bermuda Triangle for example. It rises through the water, and then UP through the air. I may not be seeing the proof that you may already have .......



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by twitchy
 


I explained my reasons for saying that in the very quote you copied. I didn't say that he outright said it, but more inferred.

BTW I thought sublimation was a solid turning into a gas....

[edit on 28/6/2010 by Chamberf=6]



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by apacheman
 


It can also happen suddenly and violently in mind boggling quantities, there are a few new theories that attribute extinction level events in our planet's hisotry to these methane releases and there have been recent examples of deadly 'burps' from volcanic lakes in Africa. Alot of folks are going to accuse you of fear mongering here, but it's a very real possibility and not something that should be dismissed out of hand until somebody gives us a real idea of just how much methane we're dealing with here.
According to what I've read, the Gulf of Mexico is one of the largest deposits of methane hydrate in the world, and we just poked a hole in it and have been releasing a gaseous form of it for well over a month now. Plumes of this stuff miles and miles long is no small amount, and a low pressure system comming into play really is a scary situation.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by twitchy
 


That was carbon dioxide that came out of the African lakes.
It was carbonic acid deep in the waters that rose and turned to carbon dioxide that killed the villagers.
Not methane.

[edit on 28/6/2010 by Chamberf=6]



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 10:13 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
reply to post by twitchy
 


That was carbon dioxide that came out of the African lakes.
It was carbonic acid deep in the waters that rose and turned to carbon dioxide that killed the villagers.
Not methane.

[edit on 28/6/2010 by Chamberf=6]


That was a mixture of gases, chief amungst them was CO2, but the principle is the same. Seismic activity was the catalyst in those examples, in the gulf, the same activity can cause a release as well as a low pressure system.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 10:15 PM
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reply to post by twitchy
 


Well sure, I don't think anyone would argue that seismic activity could create fissures to release all sorts of things. I just didn't want to leave it that what killed just under 2000 in Africa was the same methane that is in the gulf...since it wasn't even methane.

[edit on 28/6/2010 by Chamberf=6]



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 10:17 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
BTW I thought sublimation was a solid turning into a gas....
[edit on 28/6/2010 by Chamberf=6]

Yup.


marine.usgs.gov...
Gas hydrate is a crystalline Solid consisting of gas molecules, usually methane...



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 10:18 PM
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reply to post by twitchy
 


Then why use the CO2 example when the pressure in a soda is released with the cap removed?
You accused me of having faulty arguments when...

w/e if the OP replying anymore at the moment, I have past the point of caring.


[edit on 28/6/2010 by Chamberf=6]



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
reply to post by twitchy
 


Then why use the CO2 example when the pressure in a soda is released with the cap removed?


Dissolved gasses, low pressure. Open the lid on a shook up soda bottle, you are introducing a lower pressure environment to dissolved gasses under pressure. The basic properties of gasses and liquids don't change just because there are millions of civilians in the area.
Is there a better example?



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by twitchy
 


Well you are comparing a solid to a gas.



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