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Texas Rangers reportedly arrest Candi Cooper outside Austin home

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posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 11:57 PM
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reply to post by Daughter2
 
As I said, there are always a few bad apples in every profession, though I have never heard of any associated with the Rangers. Now, show me the articles that say they are scum. Sounds like they visited you in the past, hope I'm wrong.




posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:01 AM
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Originally posted by seentoomuch
"One riot, one Ranger"

I'm a huge fan of the Texas Rangers, imo we need more of them. I'd love to see them work through a crack neighborhood. Y'all can complain all you want, and a few bad apples are in any profession, but when someone makes Ranger they're in a whole different level. They're like Sherlock Holmes mixed with a cool fearless fighter. They're heros in my book. Have any of you ever met one? You feel like you're standing next to the hand of God or something.

Thank God for the Rangers,

STM

[edit on 6/28/2010 by seentoomuch]


The modern day Texas Rangers are just like any other state's Bureau of Investigations, it's just that they have the nostalgia attached to their organization. Just as Georgia has the GBI or Georgia Bureau of Investigation and New York, California and Ohio has their equivalent, Texas has the Texas Rangers. All states have their equivalent, just not the same "zing" to the name.

I have always been told since I was a little boy about one of my great Uncles who was a Texas Ranger, back in the day around the turn of the 20th century, when there was still open ranges. How cool would that have been? I'd give anything to be able to live in Texas and hope to get back around that area one day.

--airspoon



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:07 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:16 AM
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reply to post by airspoon
 
That is so cool that one of your family members was a Ranger. If I were you I'd find a few pictures of him and display them in your home. I'm sure there's lots of stories about his cases that would fascinate family and friends.

Here's a link to their museum page, you could probably call them and they could look up your great uncle and give you some insights, Wow, that is really something great,

www.texasranger.org...

STM





[edit on 6/29/2010 by seentoomuch]



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:22 AM
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Seentoomuch -

Hey you must be a Ranger, employed by a Ranger or married to a Ranger!

I'm working on a list of cases of corrupt Rangers - there was a whole book about the business of prisons in Texas - the author blamed the Rangers.
Of course there is the on-going FLDS cases. The Rangers terrorized and risked the lives of hundreds of children. They received a call and instead of tracing it they decided to risk the lives of children.

But I do want to know why you think the Rangers are ethical? Perhaps you don't hear of problems because they cover them up?



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:32 AM
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reply to post by Daughter2
 
Show me the list of sites and I'll personally call the Rangers headquarters and push for their side of it. I prefer sites with documented proof, especially if I'm gonna call them.

And lol, if there was a riot I would definitely run to the Ranger for protection, it would be like standing behind a brick wall. I guess you have spent your anarchist life running from them. I read some of your past posts and you stated that you think most cops are corrupt and that you'd never seen one help anyone. Well I've seen the Rangers in action and they do help to a higher degree than most agencies. Give them a chance, maybe you should call them and get a feel of their character,

STM



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:34 AM
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Isn't what they did with Coopers wife entrapment and illegal?

I thought so.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:42 AM
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Seen too much

So what's your connection with the Rangers? When did you see them in action?

And I'll ask again, what makes you think they are all so ethical?

Sure, lawyers, doctors and cops SHOULD be ethical but that doesn't mean they are!

You can't test for ethics. The best you can do is have a culture which has a culture of zero tolerance for bad behavior. And the first step is to realize there is nothing special about any group of cops.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:50 AM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 
If it was illegal I guess all the mailed notices all over the country telling them that they had won a sweepstakes were illegal too, no, they weren't. Most large cities use that technique now to avoid confrontation when apprehending suspects.

STM



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:57 AM
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Originally posted by JohnPhoenix
Isn't what they did with Coopers wife entrapment and illegal?

I thought so.


Entrapment is when the cops urge or cause the criminal to create the crime. For instance, if a cop gives you a bag of heroin to smuggle into a jail and then busts you for doing it, that's entrapment.

Lying to get you out of the house on the other hand or even to get you to chirp, now that's allowed. Unfortunately, if you lie to them, it is a crime. Kind of a double standard but then again, what would you expect with a system designed to favor the state at the expense of the people? Irregardless of what you learned in civics class, we do not have a government by the people, for the people and of the people, rather we have a government by the corporations, for the elite and of the state.

--airspoon



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 01:31 AM
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Originally posted by Daughter2
Seen too much

So what's your connection with the Rangers? When did you see them in action?

My husband was a Texas historian and we always met with any Ranger we had the opportunity to. After my husband came down with early onset Alzheimer's I found myself in a difficult situation, dealing with my father's probate, I called them not knowing who to turn to and they checked out the situation and advised me, the employee running my father's company was a problem, but not a major one. All that info was due to my being a Texan and depending on them.


And I'll ask again, what makes you think they are all so ethical?

Get to know a few and then you tell me. You're in Houston, right? Go to the next livestock show and have a in depth discussion. Or call them, tell them what's on your mind and listen to what they have to say, debate them, argue with them constructively and see what you think. They have excellent logic to back up their side.


You can't test for ethics.

They are required to have at least 8 years of enforcement employment with excellent records. More than 200 apply for openings and only the best of the lot is chosen to join their ranks. They're kinda like Dudley Do Right but with Sherlock and Rambo mixed in. Their records must be spotless.

STM



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 02:55 AM
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You know, going back and reading the article again it reads differently to me in between the lines. It sounds as though the police and Rangers are going back and charging Ms. Cooper for filing the false report due to the costs involved in the "Hoax" house. It was a waste of law enforcement manpower and the costs of calls like this add up. Sounds like they were examples to ward off other prank calls. Something like that.

I wonder if the local law enforcement is feeling the economic crunch and can't afford the Hoax calls? Could any city right now? I bet her sentence is pure fines to cover their costs.

STM

Edit to add: Isn't the statute of limitations about two years? It looks as if they waited to the last minute to decide to recoup their losses.

[edit on 6/29/2010 by seentoomuch]



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 03:20 AM
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If you want to read about the way the Texas Ranger operate just Google "Border Bandit War" or "Fort Brown Riot". There is a lot of history of the Rangers that most people that have them up on a pedestal don't know about.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 03:31 AM
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reply to post by seentoomuch
 


The crazy thing is that the cops should have never raided the house to begin with. It was their own illegal behavior that lead to the house being raided. They get an anonymous tip that it was a grow-house and then all of the sudden they are raiding the place. In order to raid the house, they would need a search warrant and in order to get the search warrant, they would need a hell of a lot more than a simple anonymous telephone call. So, either they lied to the judge to get the warrant or they didn't have a warrant, which I believe it is the former since they did have a warrant.

This was the whole purpose of the set-up, to show that the police aren't playing by the rules. For the life of me, I can't fathom how on Earth they could be charged for cost of the operation. If the police would have played by the rules, a little something called the law... something they are supposed to be enforcing to begin with, then there would be no cost at all. Furthermore, if it was an anonymous call, I don't see how they can tie it back to the coopers unless of course you do some expensive analysis, which just points further to fact that they are going after the Coopers for some type of vendetta. Then, I'm sure the Coopers themselves weren't the ones to make the anonymous calls in the first place, as that would seemingly be the function of a producer, though it's not entirely impossible and in which case we go back to the points made earlier within this post.

If worst comes to worse, the Coopers can claim that they really did think there could have been a plant growing at the house and that according to the law, they had no idea that the police would have acted illegally to raid the house in the first place. What gets me is, if they are so concerned about costs and tax-payer dollars, then look how much they are spending to harass the Coopers for the charge imposed.

The sad fact of the matter is that the raid was the fault of illegal behavior on behalf of the police. They should have been obeying the laws to begin with and if they were, the raid wouldn't have taken place at all.

--airspoon



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 03:43 AM
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reply to post by hypervigilant
 
Not likely, most probably a disagreement with a Ranger or a ranch hand that over time turned into this story. My husband who spent summers with his grandmother who wrote the textbooks on Spanish Land Grants still being used as primary sources today and who was taught Texas history by her would vehemently deny this allegation. I can only go on what he lectured to me and to all who visited, so, well, that's all I can say, I mean he made it crystal clear about the Rangers and what happened on the border. Shoot, even his Dad had a bullet hole shot into the wall over his crib by Pancho Villa.

I mean his family was steeped in Texas history, even to the Alamo. So all I can say is that the incident you claim was never mentioned. And this was with he and I meeting with Rangers and he recounting the history to me before each meeting in minutiae and I mean minutiae. So I have a lot of doubt about the story. Anyone can print a story, it doesn't make it true. I'll leave it at that.

STM



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 03:51 AM
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reply to post by airspoon
 
In that part of Texas just an anonymous tip would've gotten them the search warrant. Also we aren't privy to the details of the investigation and who said what about who called. I would bet that one of the people questioned admitted that Ms. Cooper called and that they have it on tape. We haven't heard the whole story yet, just one side. Be patient, it'll come out with time,

STM



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 04:02 AM
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reply to post by seentoomuch
 


That part of Texas is still subjected to the law and an anonymous call is not considered probable cause. No judge in his right mind would grant a warrant based off of an anonymous call, unless of course he was in collusion. If that was the case, then they still needed to fudge the documents submitted into court. Either way, the cops would have been guilty of it as they know the law or at least they are supposed to anyway.

Edited to add:. The other point being that an investigation was launched to prosecute a false police report based on an anonymous call? That's ridiculous and just shows that they are going after this as a vindetta and not for justice. Sure, if there was clear evidence which didn't involve much of an investigation, but this? That's crazy and just proves the point forward that they aren't out to serve justice, rather they are trying to settle a score.. a score in which they were in the wrong in the first place.

--airspoon

[edit on 29-6-2010 by airspoon]



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 04:06 AM
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reply to post by airspoon
 
It should be that way, but Texas is Texas. We'll see,

STM

Edit to add: Who are your sources on this alleged wrong doing? Oh, the ones that like the limelight, any publicity is good publicity, also they like to target law enforcement?


[edit on 6/29/2010 by seentoomuch]



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 04:12 AM
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[edit on 6/29/2010 by seentoomuch]



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 06:40 AM
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It isn't a vendetta so much. It is more about they were made to look stupid so they are getting even. I guess the vendetta isn't about Barry Cooper the man, but just that one action.

there is a lot of money, and a lot of political pull in Odessa. The Scharbauers live there....the folks who own 90% of the oil leases in this half of the state. If you own land in this area, they more than likely still own the mineral rights.

[edit on 29-6-2010 by bigfatfurrytexan]



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