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McDonald's McNuggets made with 'Silly Putty' chemical

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+21 more 
posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:24 PM
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McDonald's McNuggets made with 'Silly Putty' chemical


www.sfgate.com

What kid doesn't love McDonald's Chicken McNuggets? The white meat chunks are tasty and perfect for little mouths and hands. And while most parents are aware that McNuggets aren't perfectly healthy, they probably don't know exactly what goes into making them.

CNN has revealed that the fast-food chain makes this popular menu item with the chemical preservative tBHQ, tertiary butylhydroquinone, a petroleum-based product. Mcnuggets also contain dimethylpolysiloxane, "an anti-foaming agent" also used in Silly Putty.



Read more: www.sfgate.com...
(visit the link for the full news article)



+9 more 
posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:24 PM
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Gross, and how many kids eat this crap? Why exectly is it needed for our food in the first place. Its breaded, deep fried pieces of chicken it should be that simple. Given the turnover most of the eateries have why the need for all this crap :shk:

A few years ago they started advertising "now with white meat" WTF was int hem before


www.sfgate.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:25 PM
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And people complain when regulations are tightened for fast food restaurants. This is why regulations should be even tighter.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by FredT
 


They taste mighty good for having that chemical,I had some for lunch.


+18 more 
posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by BigDaveJr
reply to post by FredT
 


They taste mighty good for having that chemical,I had some for lunch.


but lunch should not read like a periodic table of the elements

[edit on 6/28/10 by FredT]



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:33 PM
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yeah i would rather make some soup and know there is no silly pudding in there


or a finger in my chili



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:35 PM
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Yeah but it tastes great. People are just jealous because the makers of McDonnalds are so much smarter than them.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:36 PM
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nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo not my chicken mcnuggets!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


+9 more 
posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:37 PM
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Originally posted by FredT

A few years ago they started advertising "now with white meat" WTF was int hem before




They started the "all white meat" campaign when they were using white and dark meat, and some kid wound up having a whole chicken head in his 6 piece meal. Hence the switch to only white meat.

They put this stuff in fast food to make it taste like real food. Without all of the additives and "natural flavors" no one would eat this stuff. Its all quickly grown, processed I dont know how many times, then frozen and shipped. Tossed in a deep fryer, on a grill, and timed out exactly the same, then given to the consumer. It all must be exactly the same so it all cooks the same, to save cooking time, waiting time, etc... I dont know how many steaks you have grilled, but ever notice the smallest things can change the cooking time? Cant have that with fast food, must all be made to be the same. Hence the chemicals and additives.

Ive said this a thousand times on here, and will continue banging my head into the wall. No fast food is safe. No fast food is good for you. Plan ahead, grow your own, or buy local. Its the only way to keep this crap out of you and your kids.


+34 more 
posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:37 PM
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mmmmmm.......Silly Putty......



+21 more 
posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:38 PM
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Polydimethylsiloxane is a big fancy word for bees wax - it's used to hold the meat together as a "nugget"

tert-Butylhydroquinone is a preservative that extends how long food items can be stored before spoilage.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by FredT
 


LOL,that's a good one!



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:39 PM
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This is why I've tried to limit my fast food meals to an absolute minimum! A petroleum based product in your food? For God sakes how that be good for anyone, or even approved by those who are in charge


+8 more 
posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:40 PM
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Originally posted by FredT


Gross, and how many kids eat this crap? Why exectly is it needed for our food in the first place. Its breaded, deep fried pieces of chicken it should be that simple. Given the turnover most of the eateries have why the need for all this crap :shk:

A few years ago they started advertising "now with white meat" WTF was int hem before


www.sfgate.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


I worked at Mcdonalds for 4 years, even almost bought a franchise. Do you know what the cost of a single chicken nugget is to MCD?

0.14 cents.

I'm not even joking.

Big Mac?

0.87 cents, packaging included.

The only reason why this stuff is so cheap is because it's crap product.

Ever see the commercial where they say " Made with 100$ Pure Beef"?

That's not because the meat is 100% pure beef, it's because the name of the company that makes the beef is called 100% Pure Beef.

~Keeper



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:44 PM
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I worked the McJob while at college at have to say avoided the chicken like the plague if you left it in the heat drawer long enough you could bounce a McNugget off the floor and catch it. I only eat McDonalds in instances of such drunkeness that it was either that or a passer by



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:47 PM
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I like doing this with larger groups of people but it is always fun to do when you see people sitting around talking about how bad and evil McDonalds is.
1. Get their attention
2. Ask everyone to raise their hands if they like McDonalds
This is where you will get a lot of people saying how "sick" they got from eating it and how grose the food is on and on...
3. Ask them to raise their hands if they think they can make a better hamburger than a McDonalds hamburger.
This is where you see everyone's hand go up
4. Then inform them that McDonalds is a multi billion dollar company that has makes over 3 billion a year serving 50 million daily.
5. Now ask them who here can form a company that make 1,000 dollars a day selling hamburgers that ______(insert descriptions you got in step 2)
6. Laugh



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:48 PM
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I am a maintenance tech at a poultry processing plant that actually "makes" some of the mcnuggets for mcdonalds, as well as other chicken products for other fast food restaurants including popeyes, chicfila, kfc etc.
I can tell you that yes the actual chickens are fairly young birds. Usually between 8-12 weeks old. Mcnuggets are cut from chicken breast filets, in a laser guided, surgical precision machine. The "batter" mixture is shipped to us directly from a seasoning/batter manufacturer. We cut the chicken, run it through a tumbler machine to coat them and then they are running through a bagger.
Please don't hold me responsible for what they send us to use
but no matter what ya say, they're still pretty tasty!



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by crisko
 


Im gonna say wrong on a number of accounts actually, but it isnt bees wax...and it is silica based which even organic sources ...creat kidney and gall bladder ailments the least of which is stones!

Definition: Polydimethylsiloxane
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search
Polydimethylsiloxane


IUPAC name[hide]poly(dimethylsiloxane)
Other names[hide]PDMS
dimethicone
E900
Identifiers
CAS number 63148-62-9 Y
Properties
Molecular formula (C2H6OSi)n
Density 965 kg m−3
Melting point N/A (vitrifies)

Boiling point N/A (vitrifies)

Y (what is this?) (verify)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) belongs to a group of polymeric organosilicon compounds that are commonly referred to as silicones.[1] PDMS is the most widely used silicon-based organic polymer, and is particularly known for its unusual rheological (or flow) properties. Its applications range from contact lenses and medical devices to elastomers; it is present, also, in shampoos (as dimethicone makes hair shiny and slippery), caulking, lubricating oils, and heat-resistant tiles.

PDMS is optically clear, and, in general, is considered to be inert, non-toxic and non-flammable. It is occasionally called dimethicone and is one of several types of silicone oil (polymerized siloxane).

Contents [hide]
1 Chemistry
2 Mechanical properties
3 Chemical compatibility
4 Applications
5 See also
6 References

[edit] Chemistry
The chemical formula for PDMS is CH3[Si(CH3)2O]nSi(CH3)3, where n is the number of repeating monomer [SiO(CH3)2] units. Industrial synthesis can begin from dimethylchlorosilane and water by the following net reaction:

n Si(CH3)2Cl2 + n H2O → [Si(CH3)2O]n + 2n HCl
During polymerization, this reaction evolves potentially hazardous hydrogen chloride gas. For medical uses, a process was developed in which the chlorine atoms in the silane precursor were replaced with acetate groups, so that the reaction product of the final curing process is nontoxic acetic acid (vinegar). As a side-effect, the curing process is also much slower in this case. This is the chemistry used in consumer applications, such as silicone caulk and adhesives.

Silane precursors with more acid-forming groups and fewer methyl groups, such as methyltrichlorosilane, can be used to introduce branches or cross-links in the polymer chain. Under ideal conditions, each molecule of such a compound becomes a branch point. This can be used to produce hard silicone resins. In a similar manner, precursors with three methyl groups can be used to limit molecular weight, since each such molecule has only one reactive site and so forms the end of a siloxane chain.

The polymer is manufactured in multiple viscosities, ranging from a thin pourable liquid (when n is very low), to a thick rubbery semi-solid (when n is very high). PDMS molecules have quite flexible polymer backbones (or chains) due to their siloxane linkages, which are analogous to the ether linkages used to impart rubberiness to polyurethanes. Such flexible chains become loosely entangled when molecular weight is high, which results in PDMS' unusually high level of viscoelasticity.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 




Ever see the commercial where they say " Made with 100$ Pure Beef"?


That is just clever marketing. See i could get 100% beef mix it with rat poison and children. Then i could say it was made with 100% beef, how? WORDING!!!! Made with is not the same as made of. A building is made with glass but most are not made of glass.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by FredT
 


Yea haha it seems they are making it more complicated by making a chemical concoction....Its breaded deep fried chicken, that's kinda simple.

It's probably a monetary thing, but I'd think those chemicals would be more expensive than chicken...I don't know though.

I haven't ate there in months, and I don't plan on it.




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