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Bio-diesel and your experience..

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posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 04:26 AM
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We are about to embark on a life change. After years of home educating in the city, my son has decided he would like to try the Waldorf Steiner school again [yipee].

We have some land near the coast and although we use bikes in the city I need transport to look after the 20 beehives I will be placing within a 20 mile area.
I will also be making artisan salt from the sea, and keeping up with my art studio.

We will be using horses for school runs most days.

Does anyone have any experience of bio-diesel converting from used [ chip shop etc]. I will have an oldish toyota hilux. The toyota hilux i chose for space for hives but also after watching top gear

top gear

I have contacted many groups and would love first hand experience of using the bio-diesel

apologies if thread in wrong place

[edit on 28-6-2010 by BANANAMONTANA]




posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 05:09 AM
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The Amish are upgrading to powered vehicles?


Seriously, I have owned 2 diesel pickups over the last 6 years and they are very reliable. If you are going to buy or create bio-diesel make sure that it has been "washed" properly to remove impurities. After that, your diesel pickup should run quite happily and perhaps even emit a pleasant smell (depending on source of original used oil) from its exhaust.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 05:16 AM
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Yes, some relatives of mine use biodiesel in a 10 year old (roughly) Toyota Camry.

The car runs very well on the stuff. Apparently at least as well as regular diesel. I don't really see the difference between the two with respect to to your engine but it is very important to process the biodesel properly. Particularly filtration of the final product. Removal of alcohols and acids are important too. I dare say mechanically injected engines would be less subject to problems due to impurities. You could run it in a 50/50 mix if you are a little apprehensive.

Be prepared for the mobs of obese people stalking you as the exhaust has a distinct odour of fries.....

[edit on 28-6-2010 by OZtracized]



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 05:22 AM
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reply to post by deltaalphanovember
 


Ha ha, I must admit I toyed with a similar response!

I chose to remain on topic and give a serious answer to a very reasonable question. It seems to me that you do have some experience with biodiesel though.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 05:37 AM
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reply to post by BANANAMONTANA
 

The series 4 landy (landrover) for those not in the know
Works well on Biodiesel, I would suggest placing an extra battery in the engine compartment coupled with a solar panel on the roof of your vehicle, for the winter months , So to heat up your fuel filter and fuel lines as bio fuel becomes sludgy, The heating coil can be placed around the filter and pipes to heat the fuel prior to going into the engine,
Also be careful of the Inland revenue Bio fuel is taxable (Well here in the UK) Good luck and remember to post back any pictures and reports ,S&F for effort



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 06:43 AM
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Originally posted by deltaalphanovember
The Amish are upgrading to powered vehicles?



you are a very naughty person.


There is a method in my madness. Where I am moving to, there are two buses a day.

I have one area to travel and the road is a nightmare to cycle .

The cars come bombing around the corners blowing horns... I kid you not..and you jump on the grass.

So if i use the horses i can take a short cut over the beach.;] ta da.
It is a huge excuse really.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 06:48 AM
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Originally posted by OZtracized
Yes, some relatives of mine use biodiesel in a 10 year old (roughly) Toyota Camry.

The car runs very well on the stuff. Apparently at least as well as regular diesel. I don't really see the difference between the two with respect to to your engine but it is very important to process the biodesel properly. Particularly filtration of the final product. Removal of alcohols and acids are important too. I dare say mechanically injected engines would be less subject to problems due to impurities. You could run it in a 50/50 mix if you are a little apprehensive.

Be prepared for the mobs of obese people stalking you as the exhaust has a distinct odour of fries.....

[edit on 28-6-2010 by OZtracized]


Thank you for the info I did read that the filters in the vehicle may suffer and to carry a spare few. I do think i should do a course on the filtration, I think unless i make it myself it will be impossible to source.


Great news about the toyota though, thanks for that.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 06:56 AM
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Originally posted by foxhoundone
reply to post by BANANAMONTANA
 

The series 4 landy (landrover) for those not in the know
Works well on Biodiesel, I would suggest placing an extra battery in the engine compartment coupled with a solar panel on the roof of your vehicle, for the winter months , So to heat up your fuel filter and fuel lines as bio fuel becomes sludgy, The heating coil can be placed around the filter and pipes to heat the fuel prior to going into the engine,
Also be careful of the Inland revenue Bio fuel is taxable (Well here in the UK) Good luck and remember to post back any pictures and reports ,S&F for effort


I love the landrover , I did have one at uni a short wheel base series 3 i think. I painted it pink. ;] . It was petrol and so expensive to run. I loved it though. Hardy little things..

The extra battery and solar panel idea is great thank you as the winters are poor. This is all great thanks so much.
Yes inland revenue bad...



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 07:47 AM
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reply to post by BANANAMONTANA
 


I am just jealous of your potential lifestyle
Can only dream of riding a horse across the beach to work. *sigh*

But I would need to fit my horse with surround sound, amp, subwoofer etc.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:47 AM
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With no research sources or even internet searches to back this up I don't know why I'm replying but....

A collegue of mine insists he has been using oil from his restaurant in his deisel engine and assures me that no filtration is needed providing the oil has been heated/used and it is passed through a net/cloth filter to remove particles.

I would take this advise with a pinch of salt though and obviously have a good session on Google/Youtube doing a bit of self teaching.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 10:04 AM
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This website...

www.biodiesel.org...

Should provide the information you need.


Homemade stills are better, and cheaper than the commercially made ones. A savvy recycler can probably make one for about $100-$150.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 05:28 PM
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Thanks all for your help and advice.

I found this website alsoBiodiesel in Ireland

it does seem Ireland have similar rules on tax as the UK.

Dont worry about the sound system,deltaalphanovember I have an 8 yr old son I home ed that talks all day..maybe i can send him to you ;]
I'm sure he can give you a great rendition of his own making on the Ocarina that wll make you pray for silence.
He has his sights set on a pick up so he can put his nerf gun on the back...

all i need to do now is sort out the straw bale house =p

best wishes all and I will post some pics soon..



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 07:03 PM
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Bio-diesel is not all it is cracked up to be. After the cost of initial conversion and the repairs you will have to get made regularly like cleaning the fuel injectors, new pumps/filters. Save yourself the money, if you are into the green thing just get an electric, hybrid or solar powered. Think about it there is a reason why people convert crappy old cars into the bio machines.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 07:39 PM
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reply to post by zaiger
 


Ummm... What? Bio-diesel is vastly superior than dino-diesel when it comes to solvent properties and lubricity. The current low sulfur fuel (15ppm) is ghastly hard od fuel pumps and HEUI injectors. The only drawbacks to bio-diesel are it's cold plugging point (CPP), and slightly less BTU's than dino-diesel. Older diesel vehicles (circs 1990 and older) will need modern fuel lines as the older ones tend to deteriorate with high levels (B20+)of bio-diesel.

Bio-diesel is the one true fuel of the future... High yield, renewable fuel that functions in one of the highest thermo-conversion engine types. Not to mention bio-diesel can power the largest ships, aircraft, farm equipment as well as personal vehicles.

No wonder we lack a focused energy plan...

:shk:



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 03:03 AM
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reply to post by Mirthful Me
 




Bio-diesel is the one true fuel of the future... High yield, renewable fuel that functions in one of the highest thermo-conversion engine types.

The ammount of land that would have to use to sustain would be more than we could provide. Not to mention that biodesel only contributes less greenhouse gasses about 1/2 as much. This would be offset by how it would have to be transported because it cannot be storred or run through pipes like gas and oil. So you would end up deforresting lare areas and using more fresh water to only cut emissions by 1/2. You are better off with a hybrid.

Not to mention bio-diesel can power the largest ships, aircraft, farm equipment as well as personal vehicles.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 04:20 AM
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reply to post by zaiger
 


Thank you for your input .

I hope to use oil that has been used for cooking and hope to recycle it and not buy virgin oil for food.

I am aware that arable and other land is badly maanged, to the extent that government funding prevents farmers from growing crops and this is one of the areas that do need to be examined in greater detail to prevent food shortages.

Research is taking place in Ireland regarding growing willow for wood burning, hemp for building etc and Ireland has at least 3 biodiesel factories.

Ireland passes 4.16% biodiesel mandate


In Ireland, the national parliament of Ireland passed the Energy (Biofuel Obligation and Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill 2010, which mandates that, commencing July 1, 2010, that all diesel and gasoline fuels sold in the Republic must contain 4.166 percent biofuels content



Irish farmers seek to prioritize domestic biofuel production over imports


GREEN BUSINESS: Ireland on target to produce 40% of electricity from renewables

Sea energy could generate billions in exports, council told


My aim is to live off grid and build a straw bale house a passive solar home. use reed beds, and I need to research power, be it wind or solar or a mixture of both. It is unfortunate that solar units, thermal pumps and wind turbines are expensive.

I have looked into hyrbid cars and electric cars and they work for some, indeed in London my friends come home and plug in their cars and they can be charged at points around the city. I will be moving to a very rural place and after years of no vehicle I do think i need one to make a living and to be honest I saw the way those buses come around the road and i may need a tank or i'm roadkill.

I do understand what you are saying though and thanks for the advice, I think as well as moon shine[ i didn't say that did I] biodiesel I will need a course on mechanics.

hmm you dont know anything about finding a well do you


thanks again.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 05:14 AM
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hmm you dont know anything about finding a well do you



Both my father and I have experience and success at dowsing. We use two copper wires bent in an L shape. The shorter arm is held in each hand, with the longer arm pointing straight forward. We then walk around criss-crossing the field until the rods move towards each forming a X. Basically ... X marks the spot.

Make sure you don't dig into a water main!


Dowsing

[edit on 29/6/2010 by deltaalphanovember]



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 07:59 AM
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Originally posted by deltaalphanovember


hmm you dont know anything about finding a well do you



Both my father and I have experience and success at dowsing. We use two copper wires bent in an L shape. The shorter arm is held in each hand, with the longer arm pointing straight forward. We then walk around criss-crossing the field until the rods move towards each forming a X. Basically ... X marks the spot.

Make sure you don't dig into a water main!


Dowsing

[edit on 29/6/2010 by deltaalphanovember]


Thanks for the info, that skill tends to run in families , ie dowsing of water and some people today it seems make a pretty penny.
Not saying you are the "devil" or anything.


I'll give it a go with me shovel and water table maps. Hope the farmers dont spread crapdoodle nearby though



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 08:33 AM
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Originally posted by BANANAMONTANA
Not saying you are the "devil" or anything.


I'll give it a go with me shovel and water table maps. Hope the farmers dont spread crapdoodle nearby though


That's funny, I was accused of being "in league" in another thread ... hmmm must be the pic. Amazing how you can influence people's perception by adding gorgeous cat eyes to a bad photograph of oneself.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 08:40 AM
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Have a look at this guy, he has tons of amazing info on bio fuels


www.abovetopsecret.com...

His name is joshua tickell, you may have heard of him, if not then give it a shot



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