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Oil rises as storm threatens US Gulf coast

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posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 03:32 AM
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Oil rises as storm threatens US Gulf coast


www.abs-cbnnews.com

SINGAPORE - Oil prices rose in Asian trade Monday as a major tropical storm churned towards the oil-producing Gulf of Mexico region, analysts said.

New York's main contract, light sweet crude for August delivery climbed 36 cents to $79.22 a barrel while London's Brent North Sea crude for August rose 36 cents to $
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 03:32 AM
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I want a scientist to truly tell me what the consiquences of such storm be, if it hits the center of the oil spill.



Hasegawa said the market was also eyeing the first major storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, which .ed towards the southwestern Gulf of Mexico on Sunday, threatening oil platforms in the area.


It seems the market is more concerned about oil platforms than the enviromental catasrophy it could bring to that region.

Imagine a hurricane, mixed with crude oil, and other type of gases over the states.

I guess they say it right, money makes the world go round.

That why they are more worried about the damn oil platforms.

ZZZ go to hell.

www.abs-cbnnews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jul, 3 2010 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by LittleSecret
 


BP shares more propaganda with us:



Powerful hurricane winds can act like eggbeaters, tearing big pools of oil into smaller globs, which are more palatable to oil-eating microbes, according to Siddhartha Mitra, an organic geochemist at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina.

Though oil-munching bacteria are abundant in the Gulf of Mexico, the organisms can't penetrate solid sheets of oil, and so they chew only on the edges of oil slicks.

Breaking oil into smaller pieces allows the bacteria to attack oil globs from all sides, making the microbes "fat and happy," LSU's Overton said.

"Our environment can really handle oil. It's very acclimated. It might take a year or two, but the bacteria will eat [most of the oil] up very, very quickly," Overton said. (See "Nature Fighting Back Against Gulf Oil Spill.")


news.nationalgeographic.com...



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