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Man Sentenced To Life In Prison For Shoplifting

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posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:01 PM
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Man Sentenced To Life In Prison For Shoplifting


consumerist.com

A man in Mississippi is heading up the river for the rest of his life after he was caught heisting some stuff from a Kohl's store and then led police on a car chase. Oh, and also because he'd been convicted 10 previous times.

After being arrested for trying to cash in his five-finger discount at Kohl's, local police in Mississippi ran the man's name through the system and came up with a bonanza of a rap sheet from his days in Tennessee: 18 arrests, 10 convictions (4 felony convictions; 6 prior felonies reduced to misdemeanors).

The wannabe thief was convicted of three felonies and gi
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:01 PM
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If I knew I was likely to end up in jail for the rest of my life, I would have run from the police too.

Even with a bunch of prior felonies, this seems like a pretty harsh sentence for shoplifting at Kohl's.

Yet another illustration of the folly of our "three strikes and you're out" laws.

We in the U.S. have the highest percentage of our population in prison in the world.

Isn't it time for us to rethink exactly what we are locking people up for?

consumerist.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


+2 more 
posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:03 PM
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Jeez... It's a victimless crime, i'm not excusing it - but when you hear about rapists getting 5 years and murderers getting 6 years, you gotta realise there's something massively wrong with society and the law.

Maybe the guy had Kleptomania or was funding a habit or was poor.

Sure lock him up, teach him a lesson or send him into rehab, but don't lock him away for life.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:04 PM
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In a way I disagree with 3 strikes and you're out laws, in some ways I agree.

In this case, I agree.

Looking at his record, it was obvious he was never going to change. Why lock him up for one year so he can get out and potentially kill someone robbing them.

He had his chance, and he failed horribly.

If he had killed someone, this thread would be about how incompetent the justice system is, how it was obvious he should have been locked away years ago.

I say good riddance to bad rubbish.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by Sestias
 


Thanks for the thread!

In my opinion, the punishment should equal the crime. However, it seems he has repeated this felony ten previous times. For this case, I have to agree with ThaLoccster.


Looking at his record, it was obvious he was never going to change. Why lock him up for one year so he can get out and potentially kill someone robbing them.


He has had many chances to redeem himself already.

Kind regards



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by mr-lizard
 


If the story holds true, then he honestly wasn't jailed for life for shoplifting. He was jailed for life for incurring his 3rd felony which just happened to be shoplifting. If his 3rd felony was rape would that be justifiable?

Like I said, if you continue to give people like him a chance you'll be the burnt one without a tv.

Some people make mistakes, atone for those mistakes and move on with their lives.

Some people rob and steal, get caught and try to figure out how to do it again without getting caught. That generally goes on until they die, or end up in prison for life.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:11 PM
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maybe if we met him in person it'd be more obvious why they're being so harsh. some people jsut exude that winning personality.

it's possible the judge gave him the life sentence with parole options. i doubt they'll keep him forever? he'll probably get a hearing in a few years. sounds like he just really pissed the judge off.

leaving one state because of such a terrible history then showing up in a new state and bringing your crime with you. that'd piss off quite a few people i'd imagine.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:14 PM
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I had pretty much the same experience as a kid.

By the time I was 16 I had 32 misdeamoners and 1 felony on my juvenile record. The felony being theft by recieving that I did 1 1/2 years in a "wilderness institute".

It was made very clear to me that although I was not a serious offender, I was a habitual offender. And this wilderness institute was my last chance to straighten up or find myself in prison.

Upon release it was made very clear to me, that virtually any infraction that resulted in me violating my "aftercare", even something as small as skipping school, would get me violated and most assuredly sent to prison.

I could imagine how cool I would be, in prison, for skipping school. Public enemy #1 right there guys, watch out.

I straightened up. And while I've had a few problems in my adult life, I live nothing like I did as a kid, and never attempted to become a "smarter criminal".



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by Sestias
 


yeah i would run also why not you might get a chance to live free



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by Sestias
 


Well. Considering we are the most diverse and free, nation the world, the larger prison population makes sense.

Dood got plenty of chances. He's obviously not learned anything on not stealing. Put him away.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:20 PM
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Your arguments are sound, however, the question is who do you think that shoplifting hurts ultimately? It is not the business, it is the other consumers, as they ultimately pay the price for such. Take for example, a candy bar. Simple regular sized candy bar. For every one that is stolen, it takes an estimated 18 to 20 others to be sold to make up for the loss of one. And based off of the report, the person did have other crimes, he was convicted of in 14 years 18 crimes, and then this, so he did not learn his lesson the prior 18 times. So what is the solution? We can not have people just stealing cause they want something and can not pay for it. Would it matter if you worked for that store? And what if he had a weapon and threatened someone, would it matter then?
I think that most three strikes laws should apply, but take a look at how many crimes the person has committed and how often. And the jails and prison system is the other part of the problem. I don't know about you, but I remember when being told that jail was not a place to get sent too, as it was suppose to be hard, brutal and a place that would be a deteriant. If you don't think the three strikes law is a good thing, then demand they change the penal system, where prisons and jails are places that people speak of in hushed tones and most normal people are afraid to go to, where the punisment is hard and to teach the person that crime is punished hard and they avoid doing anything to break the law ever again.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by ThaLoccster
 


i guess you can say im a "smarter" criminal i go over what i do to be smart about it and not get caught and it seems to work well.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:33 PM
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Please answer me this:

How is sending this man to prison for life accomplishing anything? It costs ~$90 a day to keep a prisoner locked up.

I've seen police set up stings to force felonies. They'd go to poor neighborhoods and set expensive bikes out (over $500 dollars so it would count as a felony (more money in their pockets) and walk away. According to your theory the teenagers that come by and hop on the bike 3 times in a row should be put away for life.

Not to make an excuse for thieves, but all convicts find it near impossible to find gainful employment even in the best economy. With the state of things today, I would say it is virtually impossible.

What we have is a lazy legislative body unwilling to take the time to create viable solutions to any social problem. Instead, they would rather sweep everything under the rug.

Our prison system is unsustainable. There is no follow through with reform. They can teach and rehabilitate all they want, but if there's no niche in society for them to gravitate to besides the one that landed them in jail to start with, then what other recourse do they have besides to go back to what they know and what fulfills their basic needs?



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:45 PM
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Quote from Bob Dylan, if yea steel a lot theyll make yea a King, steel a little theyll trow yea in Jail an maybe trow away the Key!



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:45 PM
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Originally posted by PayMeh
Please answer me this:

How is sending this man to prison for life accomplishing anything? It costs ~$90 a day to keep a prisoner locked up.

I've seen police set up stings to force felonies. They'd go to poor neighborhoods and set expensive bikes out (over $500 dollars so it would count as a felony (more money in their pockets) and walk away. According to your theory the teenagers that come by and hop on the bike 3 times in a row should be put away for life.

Not to make an excuse for thieves, but all convicts find it near impossible to find gainful employment even in the best economy. With the state of things today, I would say it is virtually impossible.

What we have is a lazy legislative body unwilling to take the time to create viable solutions to any social problem. Instead, they would rather sweep everything under the rug.

Our prison system is unsustainable. There is no follow through with reform. They can teach and rehabilitate all they want, but if there's no niche in society for them to gravitate to besides the one that landed them in jail to start with, then what other recourse do they have besides to go back to what they know and what fulfills their basic needs?

In answer to your question, the point of that is that the police are there in those neighborhoods, in an attempt to clean up the crime there, thus ending the complaint that the police are there only for the rich parts of towns.
But more importantly, how many chances do you give a person, before enough is enough? And how would you feel if it was your items that the person stole and took from you? Ever had your house broken into? I have it is not only hard financially to replace everything, and all of the paperwork, but hits the emotional level hard. You feel violated.
But part of this problem, with repeat offenders lies in the penal system, as I believe they are not harsh enough, and the prisoners have too many rights. I am believe the system needs to loose a few things to where if a person goes to prison or jail, when they get out, the fear of that place will keep them from comitting any crime ever again.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:48 PM
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Some people like being in jail,you get a bed and you get food and a society where you can fit in .You also get lot's of loving friends.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:52 PM
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reply to post by 12voltz
 


You forgot, the free education, gym equipment, clothing, medical, cable and computers as well.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:54 PM
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And most Prisons are privately run, so the more people in prison the more profit, i think the world's gone mad...



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 06:12 PM
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reply to post by sdcigarpig
 


I've worked most my life in construction. I know people that have gone through the system. I've heard the stories they tell.

They are not all bad people. Theft inherently is the visible manifestation of deeper social issues. It's why the slums of any city have the highest crime rates.

When you get out and can't find anyone who will hire you because you have a felony on your record, what are you supposed to do?

I guarantee that if you were put in a situation to where it was either you and your family starve, or you resort to stealing that you would do the latter.

Sentencing this man to life is doing nothing. The system, and we as a society have failed this man. So instead of dealing with the larger issue, we're locking him up and throwing away the key. It's easier for everyone to buck up the $90 a day than face the issue. Out of sight, out of mind.


Personally, I would support grants/tax credits given to businesses who specialize in hiring ex convicts. For the most part, any man given the chance to succeed will. The ones who can't reintegrate into society after that can be put back into the system.

Trust me, there are more people higher up who have stolen more money than you can imagine and will never see a prison cell. Until you advocate and jump on a soapbox rallying for their life sentences, then you have no right preaching here.

[edit on 27-6-2010 by PayMeh]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 06:28 PM
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So let me get this straight.

He is a repeat offender and was in a car chase with the police.

I see people upset he was given life for stealing but they are forgetting the felony evading police as well. Seeing as how it was a car chase I am more than sure he put others lives at risk. This man does not care about those of you who are so worried about him rotting in jail, he only cares for himself.

Everything in the story tells of a selfish man that is willing to put others lives at risk to benefit his own gain. I am not feeling an ounce of sympathy for him.

Raist



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