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The Age Of Oil Is Over

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posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:28 PM
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reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


If this video is correct, there is very little if anything that will stop the use of Oil. Period.
www.abovetopsecret.com... - The Video BP Doesn't want you to see.

I think people overlooked this video thinking it would be the same old hat - BP disaster horror stories.. but it's not. This guy ties our U.S Dollar into the oil economy in a way which proves our U.S. Dollar's value is supported by the oil industry.. much like gold in Fort Knox used to do. In fact the gold was replaced by oil for this purpose.

This implications are amazing and shocking. If what this guy says is true, and it looks like there is plenty of evidence to suggest he is, then this whole system is engineered to do two things. 1, keep the U.S. Dollar around, Keep Oil around.

If all oil companies were to suddenly stop drilling the U.S Dollar would tank worse than any other time in history. This causes major problems with cutting back on oil to implement alternative energies.


Now, Watch the video then come back and tell me why it's wrong. Tell me things haven't got this crazy and that there are other better ways our Dollar's value is derived. I haven't heard any.

I don't even remember them covering that in school. What do schools say our dollar is based on if not this?

Many people believe since Gold left the picture out Dollar is backed by our labor and willingness to produce:

"Ever since gold was removed as the backing of our currency, your personal labor and property have taken gold's place as collateral for our national debt. Every time the Federal Reserve Bank creates new money, it is a claim against your labor and property. It's not a coincident that the IRS was created at the same time as the FRB. It is their agency to collect your payments against your indebtedness."

www.nolanchart.com...

I believe this is hogwash. Here's why -

Why back the dollar with an intangible promise? There is no solid exchange in that. Our Property.. yeah right.. when is the last time you heard someone was unwilling to produce labor and they had their property taken away to pay the national debt... that never happens.

It's all smoke and mirrors if you ask me.

If you study the IRS you will see that yes, they collect debts but not for the reasons of this backing the U.S. Dollar. They are collecting for debts the USA owes to foreign countries from the money the US has borrowed over the years. Going back way before the 1900's.

maya12-21-2012.com...

You can prove this to yourself by studying your 1040 form.


[edit on 27-6-2010 by JohnPhoenix]




posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:31 PM
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reply to post by Steve8511
 


Yep.

I know very few people who are truly petrol free. And those who are (I do know a few) spend all their time with basic necessities to have any spare time criticizing everyone else.

We need to restructure our energy grid to be more connected to local infrastructure, instead of designed to consume energy for profit, for one. Local, regionally-appropriate energy models. Coal in some places, hydro in others, wind and solar in others. Give people more of an opportunity to opt-out of the one-size-fits-all model.

I get a good laugh from the people who still drive and consume, but criticize those who drive a slightly less fuel efficient car. As if the 8 miles to the grocery store is equivelent to the thousands of miles the goods you are both consuming had to travlel to reach you.

We're all culpable. Every last one of us, equally.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


But the US doesnt even produce that much oil. So how could the dollar be connected to oil?

Pardon my ignorance. Its an honest question.

Oh, and they taught me in school the dollar is backed by nothing other than the strength of the government. I recall that from 9th or tenth grade i think.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:39 PM
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We can't be petrol free, but we can all conserve when we can. We can buy product in glass rather than plastic if we have that option. We can recycle. We can use cloth bags instead of plastic when we shop. We can shop with a list to cut down trips to the store. The hubs and I already have 1 day a week that we don't drive. We have one vehicle which is for his transportation to and from work, and we chose to live within 5 miles of his job. I use public transportation. It's easy to drive down to the store when you think you need something or just throw everything in the trash instead of recycling. But with a little planning, we can all find areas where we can conserve.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:42 PM
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oil is civilization, it is used in production of all things that are a part of "civilized" culture.

The age of oil is over only if they say so.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:42 PM
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Originally posted by Oneolddude
A very small percentage of a barrel of petroleum actually becomes gasoline you put into your vehicle.

Look around at all the plastic products you purchase daily.


I don't believe that for a second, unless you think that 70% is a small percentage, up to you.


Today, oil meets 37 percent of US energy demand , with 70 percent directed to fuels used in transportation – gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. Another 24 percent is used in industry and manufacturing, 5 percent is used in the commercial and residential sectors, and between 1 and 2 percent is used to generate electricity. [ii] It moves our nation’s commerce and its use for transportation has made our world more intimate. It is the transportation fuel, as almost all of our nation’s transportation is dependent upon its concentrated liquid form.


www.instituteforenergyresearch.org...

The fact and the matter is that transportation fuels remains the lion share of the usage of oil, a huge chunk (switching from moving goods by 18 wheelers on the road to shipping them by train could help, without a big life style change).



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:43 PM
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Originally posted by speculativeoptimist
I found this vid today and thought I would share it because of it's message



I've been at ATS for 5 years with the end of my signature being:

"...the power of will, the spoken word,the mighty pen in the dawn of the post petroleum era."


perhaps it is finally manifesting?

Sri Oracle



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:47 PM
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reply to post by darkelf
 


While i agree that those are all very valid options, as long as the things you buy that you put into those cloth bags (in addition to the bags themselves, oftentimes) are still brought to you via petrol-run machines, you are still contributing to the system. that is my main point.

People often focus on personal transportation, and this is indeed a large portion of what we as a nation consume (USA), the other major portions are transport of goods and manufacturing, as well as the military.

We could all stop driving to work tomorrow and it wouldnt effect much if A). we continue to buy products brought to us from thousands of miles away (food, lumber, plastic toys, clothes, shoes, beer, et c etc etc) and B). Continue to have a military that consumes 3-400,000 barrels A DAY energybulletin.net... . The reality is, it is far, far bigger than re-useable bags and riding a bike.

edited for atrocious spelling.

[edit on 27-6-2010 by justadood]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:49 PM
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Originally posted by PopeyeFAFL

Originally posted by Oneolddude
A very small percentage of a barrel of petroleum actually becomes gasoline you put into your vehicle.

Look around at all the plastic products you purchase daily.


I don't believe that for a second, unless you think that 70% is a small percentage, up to you.


Today, oil meets 37 percent of US energy demand , with 70 percent directed to fuels used in transportation – gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. Another 24 percent is used in industry and manufacturing, 5 percent is used in the commercial and residential sectors, and between 1 and 2 percent is used to generate electricity. [ii] It moves our nation’s commerce and its use for transportation has made our world more intimate. It is the transportation fuel, as almost all of our nation’s transportation is dependent upon its concentrated liquid form.


www.instituteforenergyresearch.org...

The fact and the matter is that transportation fuels remains the lion share of the usage of oil, a huge chunk (switching from moving goods by 18 wheelers on the road to shipping them by train could help, without a big life style change).


Yes, but those figures count transportation of GOODS. That isnt just personal automobiles.

I've seen conflicting numbers, and perhaps i am wrong, but my understanding is that transportation of goods is far higher than personal transport.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:49 PM
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Originally posted by justadood
reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


But the US doesnt even produce that much oil. So how could the dollar be connected to oil?

Pardon my ignorance. Its an honest question.

Oh, and they taught me in school the dollar is backed by nothing other than the strength of the government. I recall that from 9th or tenth grade i think.


See my edited update on the above post for extra info.

The U.S does not have to produce all the oil.. watch the video. This guy says that all oil internationally is traded through the U.S Dollar.

I'd have to rewatch it again to see exactly how he worded this.. but it's in there.

[edit on 27-6-2010 by JohnPhoenix]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:50 PM
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They want US to change, they want to control us, while they refuse to rectify their own errors, outmoded procedure and lies.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


Indeed, but your original post said that if the us stopped domestic production, the dollar would tank.

That doesnt jive. Just because oil is priced in dollars (for now) I dont see how that is connected to domestic production of oil.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 08:56 PM
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reply to post by justadood
 


I agree. As consumers, we really need to ask ourselves, "do I really need this?" before buying anything. But we can't simply stop consuming simply because everything is brought to us by oil. We have to make smart decisions and know where we have choices.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by justadood
reply to post by Geeky_Bubbe
 


Semantics, perhaps.

In the grand scheme of things, even our iphones are useless trinkits.


Whoa! Maybe your iPhone, but mine is an essential component of my life


Seriously. I don't talk on my iPhone much but I use it as both an information tool, and a business communication [email & text] device. Whether we like it or not, there are fewer and fewer employed people who can go about "unplugged" without it being detrimental to either our positions or our functions within those positions.

Someday, perhaps, when we can be "wet wired," something that I eagerly await btw.

I believe most people do "their bit" in a general sense. Just try being environmentally callous if you have a school aged child around. They are worse than any KGB or Gestapo.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 09:12 PM
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Originally posted by justadood
reply to post by darkelf
 


While i agree that those are all very valid options, as long as the things you buy that you put into those cloth bags (in addition to the bags themselves, oftentimes) are still brought to you via petrol-run machines, you are still contributing to the system. that is my main point.

People often focus on personal transportation, and this is indeed a large portion of what we as a nation consume (USA), the other major portions are transport of goods and manufacturing, as well as the military.

We could all stop driving to work tomorrow and it wouldnt effect much if A). we continue to buy products brought to us from thousands of miles away (food, lumber, plastic toys, clothes, shoes, beer, et c etc etc) and B). Continue to have a military that consumes 3-400,000 barrels A DAY energybulletin.net... . The reality is, it is far, far bigger than re-useable bags and riding a bike.

edited for atrocious spelling.

[edit on 27-6-2010 by justadood]


I agree with you, but don't forget the original poster was saying "a very small percentage", it is not a very small percentage.

As I recall (not sure), the transportation (truck, train, etc.) vs personal cars is split somewhere like 60/40 (maybe 70/30), so 40% of 70%, still amount to a decent % (not the "very small" claim).



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 09:13 PM
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Originally posted by justadood
reply to post by darkelf
 


While i agree that those are all very valid options, as long as the things you buy that you put into those cloth bags (in addition to the bags themselves, oftentimes) are still brought to you via petrol-run machines, you are still contributing to the system. that is my main point.

People often focus on personal transportation, and this is indeed a large portion of what we as a nation consume (USA), the other major portions are transport of goods and manufacturing, as well as the military.

We could all stop driving to work tomorrow and it wouldnt effect much if A). we continue to buy products brought to us from thousands of miles away (food, lumber, plastic toys, clothes, shoes, beer, et c etc etc) and B). Continue to have a military that consumes 3-400,000 barrels A DAY energybulletin.net... . The reality is, it is far, far bigger than re-useable bags and riding a bike.

edited for atrocious spelling.

[edit on 27-6-2010 by justadood]


I agree with you, but don't forget the original poster was saying "a very small percentage", it is not a very small percentage.

As I recall (not sure), the transportation (truck, train, etc.) vs personal cars is split somewhere like 60/40 (maybe 70/30), so 40% of 70%, still amount to a decent % (not the "very small" claim).



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 09:15 PM
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Originally posted by justadood
reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


Indeed, but your original post said that if the us stopped domestic production, the dollar would tank.

That doesnt jive. Just because oil is priced in dollars (for now) I dont see how that is connected to domestic production of oil.


I cannot explain it like the guy on the video can.. watch the video.. you may be able to explain better what he is talking about than I can.. all of that info is new to me.

If you don't watch the video, you cannot understand what I am trying to say. After you see it, if it is wrong.. perhaps you can tell me why it's wrong.



[edit on 27-6-2010 by JohnPhoenix]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 09:40 PM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


Great video -- be sure to watch the Money Masters for more on the corrupt banking system and how it works. The posted video touches on some of it.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 09:53 PM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 

A very revealing video of the oil/dollar architecture, thanks


So we are so dependent on it that any attempt to reform, modify or reduce our relation to it only hurts us....what a dilemma!
So this is just business as usual and we should just move on....


Bring on the innovation, the magnetic motors, the artificial photosynthesis vehicles, the hydrogen and electric, Tesla's aether energy! Granted these things take oil to produce but it begins to minimize our dependance, no?

Peace


[edit on 27-6-2010 by speculativeoptimist]



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 10:27 PM
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Just in..

Gulf Spill Catastrophe Day 68 June 27



Wow, I did not know those platforms could move in the event of a storm...46,000 tons at 6-7 mph

www.nhc.noaa.gov...


[edit on 27-6-2010 by speculativeoptimist]




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