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The Anu or The Aunu People of Pre-Dynastic Egypt - perhaps the original inhabitants of Egypt

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posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 01:48 PM
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I had posted this today in another forum, i thought i would share this over here too.

today while i was surfing the net looking for information on Pre-Dynastic Egypt or about the original Inhabitants of Egypt, i came across the mention of The Anu or The Aunu People.

Further look up provided the following information.

The Prominent Egyptologist Flnders Petrie (who found the Merneptah Stele, which has the first mention of "Israel" in anywhere in ancient Egypt) found the Tera-neter on a on a green glazed faience in the early temple at Abydos underneath the dynastic temple.




Flinders petrie refers to the Anu people in his work The Making of Egypt, in 1939




"The Aunu People. Besides these types, belonging to the north and east, There is the aboriginal race of the Anu, or Aunu, people (written with three pillars), who became a part of the historic inhabitants. The subject ramifies too doubtfully if we include all single-pillar names, but looking for the Aunu, written with the three pillars, we find that they occupied Southern Egypt and Nubia, and the name is also applied in Sinai and Libya. As to the Southern Egyptians, we have the most essential document, a portrait of a chief, Tera-neter, roughly modeled in relief in green glazed faience, found in the early temple at Abydos. Preceding his name, his address is given on this earliest of visiting cards, "Palace of the Aunu in Hermen city, Tera-neter." Hemen was the name of the god of Tuphium (Lanz., Dict, 544), 13 miles south of Luqsor. Erment, opposite to it, was the place of Aunu of the south, Aunu Menti. The next place in the south is Aunti (Gebeleyn), and beyond that Aunyt-seni (Esneh). The chief peculiarity of the figure is the droop of the chin; this is caused by a slanting jaw with short ramus. The same type of jaw is seen in the ivory king from Abydos, and moreover, the Scorpion king who preceded Nar-mer.



Read More on The Tera-neter and the Anu/Aunu people

Psst...so there was a real Scorpion King. wow!!

The prominent French Egyptologist Abbe Émile Amélineau (who is claimed to have discovered the reference to the Anu/Aunu) also says




These Anu were agricultural people, raising cattle on a large scale along the Nile, shutting themselves up in walled cities for defensive purposes. To this people we can attribute, without fear of error, the most ancient Egyptian books, The Book of the Dead and the Texts of the Pyramids, consequently, all the myths or religious teachings. I would add almost all the philosophical systems then known and still called Egyptian. They evidently knew the crafts necessary for any civilization and were familiar with the tools those trades required. They knew how to use metals, at least elementary metals. They made the earliest attempts at writing, for the whole Egyptian tradition attributes this art to Thoth, the great Hermes an Anu like Osiris, who is called Onian in Chapter XV of The Book of the Dead and in the Texts of the Pyramids. Certainly the people already knew the principal arts; it left proof of this in the architecture of the tombs at Abydos, especially the tomb of Osiris and in those sepulchers objects have been found bearing unmistakable stamp of their origin, such as carved ivory, or a little head of a Nubian girl found in a tomb near that of Osiris, or the small wooden or ivory receptacles in the form of a feline head--all documents published in the first volume of my Fouilles d'Abydos.
Link

What i have searched links to some Afro-Centric Black Power Propaganda sites too, claiming much stuff.

Any more inputs on these Mysterious people, who don't find much mention in books on Ancient Egypt?
all info is welcome.

Note - What i have posted above is what i have found during my search on the net. it doesn't reflect my ideas or theories. I am just seeking more info on these ancient people. No trolling please!




posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by coredrill
 
You might find this short podcast interesting...Egyptian Clay Cattle (right click and save as)

The transcript is available here.

Even further back, we've got Nabta Playa and the Fayum neolithic culture.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 02:38 PM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 





Even further back, we've got Nabta Playa and the Fayum neolithic culture.


Come on Kandi out with it, how far back are you talking, the Fayum?
They're the only ones I havn't heard any mention of before. Good thread so far some tasty info.
SnF



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by randyvs
 
The Fayum were just a small population of hunter-gatherers with a taste for fish. They were out there maybe a couple of thousand years before Egypt as we know it.

Whenever I think about the early Egyptians, the nasty image of them tapping blood from cattle comes up. Their cattle weren't like ours and didn't produce milk they could digest...or much of it. Egyptologists reckon they tapped the blood like the Massai Mara do to this day. Makes me feel sick.

I saw a doco where the Massai had a 'coming of age' ceremony. They drew blood from a cow into a bowl and passed it around. You'd likely kick some ass to be at the front of the queue...by the time it gets to the guys at the end of the line it's cold and clotted.



posted on Jun, 27 2010 @ 05:41 PM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
Whenever I think about the early Egyptians, the nasty image of them tapping blood from cattle comes up. Their cattle weren't like ours and didn't produce milk they could digest...or much of it. Egyptologists reckon they tapped the blood like the Massai Mara do to this day. Makes me feel sick.


But there's no evidence of this (and the "I'm saying this based on one piece of artwork" is just bad science.) Unlike the Masai areas, there's no foodstuffs that involve blood and no references of the gods drinking the blood of a sacred cow or of Hathor. Images of cattle slaughter don't show blood collection (though there are a few Middle Kingdom pieces that imply they might have eaten blood pudding.)

As someone noted, the main evidence promoted comes from afrocentrist sites. If you look at neutral material (the skulls of the people they dug up), you find that they're "mediterranean" types and look more Arabic.

Now... 2-0.5 million years ago, the inhabitants may have looked more like the people of interior Africa. However, based on the bones, those who have been around for the past 8,000 years or so definitely looked more Arabic.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 09:19 PM
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Hi Coredrill, Kandinsky, and Byrd
Nice topic, it's always interesting to read about ancient original inhabitants of any land, next to Sumer, Egypt is probably the most misunderstood in terms of just who it's original peoples were, or maybe a better term would be "misrepresented" due to the efforts of fringe writers.

You might find this article interesting; from AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (2006):

Who Were the Ancient Egyptians? Dental Affinities
Among Neolithic Through Postdynastic Peoples
(.pdf format)

The author of refers to the people in your post as the Aamu.



posted on Jun, 28 2010 @ 10:00 PM
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I did get more information on the item from sources I thought were more reliable. As I suspected, the god, "Set" isn't mentioned in the tile.

Here's the catalog description:

"OIM 7911 - Plaque - Abydos, Temple, Grv M69 - Protodynastic - Faience - 135x96 mm Glazed Frit, Rect, Prehistoric Negroid Figure Facing Rt., Holding Staff. Ins Ascribes The Fig. To Be Chief Tera-Neter, Deovted To God, Of The Fortress Of The Anu In Hemen."
oi.uchicago.edu...


No picture, alas. I really wanted to see a picture.

According to Katherine Griffiths-Greenberg, the Anu are a group of enemies mentioned in something called the "Execration Texts." They spelled the name, "apr'u-anw". One Egyptologist, Heras (1953), theorized that the Egyptian pharaonic feast called the "Feast of Striking down the Anu" refers to the Anu invaders from Syria. They suggested that the Anu were originally from India.

Blackmarketeer, the paper you cited makes sense from a geographic view.



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 12:27 AM
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Blood is tissue, just like filet mignon.

Nothing wrong with eating it, and no reason not to.

Other than cultural, that is.

I've seen Andrew Zimmern eat blood in a spectacular number of variations.

If you gave me some blood sausage, I'd eat it.

Harte



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 09:58 AM
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I was thinking of Andrew Zimmern, actually, when I wrote that!

But the evidence for any blood pudding as a common dish isn't strong at all. There's a *possible* mention in a couple of places, but that's it. In general, cattle seemed to be for pulling things and slaughter for beef.

The common man wouldn't own many head of cattle or a lot of land... and at this point, I suppose I should go off and look up ancient Egypt and the diets of commoners, right?



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 10:54 AM
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G'day All,

TUATHA DE DANANN: Ireland.
Race of gods who finally overthrew the Fomors.
The Irish said they were giants who lived in underground chambers at Tara and built stone temples.

ANU (an-oo) ANANN / DANA / DANA-ANA:
Ireland. Mother Earth; goddess of plenty, another aspect of the Morrigu; Great Goddess; greatest of all goddesses.

The fertility goddess, sometimes she formed a trinity with Babd and Macha.
Her priestesses comforted and taught the dying.
Fires were lit for her at Midsummer.
Two hills in Kerry are called the Paps of Anu.
Maiden aspect of the triple Goddess in Ireland.
Guardian of CATTLE and health.
Goddess of fertility, prosperity, comfort.

I just thought I would throw that into the mix for you, in my study's I have found many cultures that have the same gods and goddess.
It is my belief that the Tuatha De Danann were the children of the Sumerian Anunnaki and the Aunu people may very well be the same.

Blessed Be...



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 10:49 PM
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I googled through and got this book at Google Books

Of Gods and Men: Egypt’s Old Kingdom- Wayne Chandler

It is of course a Afro Centrist Book, but interesting to read.
Could somebody corroborate whats in the book?



posted on Jun, 29 2010 @ 11:02 PM
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Zep Tepi is a fascinating concept.
Wonder how deep the Anu were into anything like that, or if the concept was simply created retroactivley.



posted on Jul, 2 2010 @ 02:45 PM
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Originally posted by Kernoonos
G'day All,

TUATHA DE DANANN: Ireland.
Race of gods who finally overthrew the Fomors.
The Irish said they were giants who lived in underground chambers at Tara and built stone temples.

ANU (an-oo) ANANN / DANA / DANA-ANA:
Ireland. Mother Earth; goddess of plenty, another aspect of the Morrigu; Great Goddess; greatest of all goddesses.


The fertility goddess, sometimes she formed a trinity with Babd and Macha.
Her priestesses comforted and taught the dying.
Fires were lit for her at Midsummer.
Two hills in Kerry are called the Paps of Anu.
Maiden aspect of the triple Goddess in Ireland.
Guardian of CATTLE and health.
Goddess of fertility, prosperity, comfort.

well no, its danu, also why would a feritility goddess be connected to a goddess of war?
the morrigan was a goddess of war, and i think you mean nemain, not danu.

Danu was the mother goddess, she was a goddess of water.


I just thought I would throw that into the mix for you, in my study's I have found many cultures that have the same gods and goddess.
It is my belief that the Tuatha De Danann were the children of the Sumerian Anunnaki and the Aunu people may very well be the same.

Blessed Be...


i think you maybe a bit off, there is no relations between the pro-indo-europian tuatha de danaan and the anunnaki.
i hope you do realize that there is a limit to the sounds the human throat can make right?



posted on Jul, 5 2010 @ 09:52 AM
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reply to post by coredrill
 


so byrd says the anu are the apiru? and they are from india?

petrie said faiyum & badari were migrations from the caucasus, the amration a libyan invasion, gerzean eastern desert people and dynastic egypt from elam by way of the red sea and ethiopia. i don't remember if he said the other folks following the gerzean but before dynastic were from somewhere else.

HERE are some figurines from egypt. the ma'adi [first metalworkers??] stuff is odd.





[edit on 5-7-2010 by Parta]



posted on Jul, 5 2010 @ 10:19 AM
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Originally posted by Parta
reply to post by coredrill
 


so byrd says the anu are the apiru? and they are from india?


That's the current evidence. I'm just reporting what I found.


petrie said faiyum & badari were migrations from the caucasus, the amration a libyan invasion, gerzean eastern desert people and dynastic egypt from elam by way of the red sea and ethiopia.


Remember that Petrie was working 100 years ago. Translations and digs and investigations didn't stop with his death. He had much less material and much fewer sites to go on.


HERE are some figurines from egypt. the ma'adi [first metalworkers??] stuff is odd.


From several different sites and several different eras. Interesting stuff, though! I like the little pottery figurines best; it's an easy material to work and you often get the more interesting objects done in clay. Stone is for more formal portraits. Clay is for the common man and the village potter.





[edit on 5-7-2010 by Parta]



posted on Jul, 5 2010 @ 10:27 AM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


well we all know where people can go with the apiru....

petrie is old yes but its nice to be a little more precise than the op.

the figurines are divided up nicely into a more modern slice & dice.

lots of people look to pottery for connections but to me its the idol worship where we show where we come from [as seen in the other albums there]

ps... you killed the hyperboreans? did it need links?



[edit on 5-7-2010 by Parta]



posted on Jul, 5 2010 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by silent thunder
Zep Tepi is a fascinating concept.
Wonder how deep the Anu were into anything like that, or if the concept was simply created retroactivley.


Crystalinks reported modern channeled stuff (oddly enough) on that page, rather than going back to source material. It's a more recent belief of Ancient Egypt (Middle Kingdom or more recent), given the list of kings of improbable length of life that does NOT match with any other living ruler.
en.wikipedia.org...

It does appear in the Pyramid Texts in the pyramid of Unis, so some things about this are relatively old. Don't see a connection with the Anu or a borrowing from them with the sources I'm seeing.





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