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Rare Hole In the Moon Photographed

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posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:07 PM
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Rare Hole In the Moon Photographed


www.space.com

New photos of the moon have revealed the most detailed views yet of a rare hole in the lunar surface — a pit large enough to swallow an entire football field whole.

High-resolution cameras aboard the Japanese Kaguya spacecraft first spotted the irregularly shaped chasm, located in Mare Ingenii on the moon's southern hemisphere. Now, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has taken a new, up-close photo of the moon pit from lunar orbit.

"Only three have been discovered thus far, so I believe it is safe to state that skylights (pits) are rare at the 100-meter scale," Mark Robinson, prin
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:07 PM
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Now before someone says that this has already been discussed before, it has not. The prior threads on ATS in regards to holes in the moon discuss a hole that was previously discovered by the Kaguya mission in the Marius Hills region of the moon last year.

The new pit in Mare Ingenii, however, lacks the numerous volcanic features that were found in the Marius Hills region.

Just thought I would share this new photo with you guys, Im pretty sure this one has not been discussed before.

So if this lacks the features of the usual lava tube, then what could it be? What caused it?

---GeminiSky

www.space.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 26-6-2010 by GeminiSky]



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:11 PM
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Thanks for the pic.

Goes to support my theory about Swiss cheese in the southern hemisphere.



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:23 PM
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Before we invented football fields...how the heck did we estimate big sizes?!



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:24 PM
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The opening does not lack the features of a lava tube skylight. It has all the features of a lava tube skylight, including the debris from the collapse of its roof.

You misread. Neither the space.com article nor the original article say that this feature is not a lava tube skylight. They both say it (probably) is. What they do say is that the Mare Ignenii region lacks the obvious volcanic features of the Marius Hills. This does not mean there was not volcanic activity here, it just means the form that activity took is different from that at Marius Hills. Not so surprising, compare the volcanic activity of Kilauea in Hawaii with the volcanic activity of the Cascade Mountains. Completely different, yet both are volcanic.

And Kaguya did photograph this hole.


[edit on 6/26/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by GeminiSky
 


Good find. If it is a lava tube, I did not know that the moon was proven to support vulcanism.

Looks more like a high-speed projectile (e.g. heavy iron-nickle asteroid) hit at an angle, and burrowed in making a nice clean hole.

edit to add: It looks more like an exit hole, from some space object that entered from the other side of the moon. Perhaps a wayward Einsteinian particle (e.g. black hole).

Good for further discovery and discussion. Thanks! Keeps my mind off my beloved Gulf of Mexico.

[edit on 26-6-2010 by 1SawSomeThings]



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:30 PM
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Maybe David Icke is right about the moon base


Actually that does look a lot like the holes by the south pole people posted in a hollow earth thread

i.ytimg.com...



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:33 PM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
Before we invented football fields...how the heck did we estimate big sizes?!



They said "acre" instead....



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:33 PM
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Originally posted by HunkaHunka

Originally posted by Kandinsky
Before we invented football fields...how the heck did we estimate big sizes?!



They said "acre" instead....



Good Lord America!

Convert already.

~Keeper



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Phage, the article that I linked states this



The new pit in Mare Ingenii, however, lacks the numerous volcanic features that were found in the Marius Hills region.


And the original one states this:




Similar to the Marius Hills pit, the pit in Mare Ingenii is probably the result of a partially collapsed lava tube. However, the numerous volcanic features of the Marius Hills (such as the prominent rilles and domes) are not found in Mare Ingenii. Why the differences between regions?


This opens up the possibility that it MAY NOT be a lava tube.

I was not saying I know for certain what it is, nor does anyone at this point. I was simply speculating on what else it may be.

--GeminiSky

[edit on 26-6-2010 by GeminiSky]



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by 1SawSomeThings
 


Yes, now that I look at it more, it does look like an exit hole!!

The edges are really clean cut it seems.



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by GeminiSky
 

The photo looks less like a hole and more like and object was inked over to mask whatever it is.
Would not a real hole show a bit more of the inside walls before a shadow is cast?



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by Sanity Lost
 


You also have a point. Are the Japanese airbrushing their photos just like NASA?

Could this have been some sort of structure or craft that they did not want us to see?



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:55 PM
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These pits could have a huge application in manned exploration of the moon, allowing construction of below surface living quarters, shielded from solar rays and heat. We could become cave dwellers again.



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by MelonMusketeer
 


I wonder how deep it actually goes?

And if its completely vertical or curves horizontally at some point?



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by GeminiSky
 

My apologies, you are correct. Space.com does say that. I prefer to refer to the original source whenever possible ( I see you edited your post).

Similar to the Marius Hills pit, the pit in Mare Ingenii is probably the result of a partially collapsed lava tube. However, the numerous volcanic features of the Marius Hills (such as the prominent rilles and domes) are not found in Mare Ingenii.

source

It looks like a skylight to me.

Here's one from the inside (smaller of course).












[edit on 6/26/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by GeminiSky
 

A lava tube can extend for great distances.



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


No problem!! Cool inside Pic! Im assuming that one was taken on earth?

In any case, does anyone feel these discoveries could prove or disprove the hollow moon theory?



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by GeminiSky
 


Speaking of lost sanity...



You also have a point. Are the Japanese airbrushing their photos just like NASA?


Why sully a perfectly fine thread, one of some interest, with dreck like this??



+3 more 
posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


The only "dreck" I see is your post.

Please do let us know when you have something of substance to contribute!

Thanks!!

--GeminiSky



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