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If Oil Occurs Naturally As A Fossil Fuel, Why doesn't it break down naturally?

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posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 09:32 PM
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If oil has been produced by the earth, why wouldn't the earth be able to eventually absorb it? Seriously....




posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 09:37 PM
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because it isn't a fossil fuel.

decaying matter doesn't go 35,000 + ft below the surface, what a crock.

They know it isn't but they lie to us for power and price inflation.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 09:45 PM
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Originally posted by freetree64
If oil has been produced by the earth, why wouldn't the earth be able to eventually absorb it? Seriously....


Oil was never meant to be released from the earth.

At least that's what I think.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 09:54 PM
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If Oil is not made from decaying fossils, then what is it?

" Abiogenic petroleum origin is an alternative hypothesis to the prevailing theory of biological petroleum origin. Most popular in the Soviet Union between the 1950s and 1980s, the abiogenic hypothesis has little support among contemporary petroleum geologists, who argue that abiogenic petroleum does not exist in significant amounts on Earth and that there is no indication that an application of the hypothesis is or has ever been of commercial value.

The abiogenic hypothesis argues that petroleum was formed from deep carbon deposits, perhaps dating to the formation of the Earth. The presence of methane on Saturn's moon Titan is cited as evidence supporting the formation of hydrocarbons without biology. Supporters of the abiogenic hypothesis suggest that a great deal more petroleum exists on Earth than commonly thought, and that petroleum may originate from carbon-bearing fluids that migrate upward from the mantle.


Although the biogenic theory for petroleum was first proposed by Georg Agricola in the 16th century, various abiogenic hypotheses were proposed in the nineteenth century, most notably by Alexander von Humboldt, the Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev and the French chemist Marcellin Berthelot. Since that time, the abiogenic hypotheses have lost ground to the view that petroleum is a fossil fuel.

Abiogenic hypotheses were revived in the last half of the twentieth century by Russian and Ukrainian scientists, and more interest was generated in the West by the publication in 1999 of The Deep Hot Biosphere by Thomas Gold. Gold cited the discovery of thermophile bacteria in the Earth's crust as new support for the postulate that these bacteria could explain the existence of certain biomarkers in extracted petroleum."

Read more here: en.wikipedia.org...

You see, this is another case where science has promoted the fossil fuel theory as fact. Another nail in the coffin of The Cult of the Church of Science.

It was never a fact, only always a theory.

More on Oil not being a fossil fuel:

www.wnd.com...

www.wnd.com...

amlibpub.blogspot.com...



[edit on 25-6-2010 by JohnPhoenix]

[edit on 25-6-2010 by JohnPhoenix]



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 09:57 PM
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Most oils comes from trees and the by product from the oil seperation is turpentin which would be more toxic then the oil. Turpentine (also called spirit of turpentine, oil of turpentine, and wood turpentine) is a fluid obtained by the distillation of resin obtained from trees. Turpentine is an organic solvent. Its vapor can irritate the skin and eyes, damage the lungs and respiratory system, as well as the central nervous system when inhaled, and cause renal failure when ingested, among other things. It also poses a fire hazard since it is flammable. Sounds like it could be a secret ingredient in dispersants being used? Take a look at the NALCO COREXIT 9500 warning label.




posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 10:01 PM
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Originally posted by xstealth
because it isn't a fossil fuel.

decaying matter doesn't go 35,000 + ft below the surface, what a crock.

They know it isn't but they lie to us for power and price inflation.





I knew years ago. I think that oil is a by-product maybe even a waste by-product of the workings of the planet. At that pressure and heat anything could happen. And if it was a fossil fuel it would be all over the planet and not just in a few places. Also if it was a fossil fuel we would have pumped the planet dry a hundred years ago. I got in trouble way back in school about this. I did not buy into the fossil fuel myth even back in the 5th grade. Drill deep enough and you may find oil on the moon if it has the heat and pressure needed, I bet just about any planet could make oil.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 10:02 PM
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Reply to post by JBA2848
 


My guess is that because oil takes so long to create, it probably takes a long time to "un-create". Does that make sense? But thats just my guess, i am by no means an oil expert.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 10:04 PM
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Originally posted by freetree64
...why wouldn't the earth be able to eventually absorb it?


It does and actually causes some plants to flourish. But, the environmentalist nutjobs wouldn't have anything to whine about, if that is made known.

Caveat: I'm referring to the environmentalists who are nutjobs, not claiming all environmentalists as such.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 10:05 PM
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I should also add that you have fish oils, whale oils, even humans have oil its a product of fatty tissue.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 10:05 PM
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Originally posted by fixer1967


I knew years ago. I think that oil is a by-product maybe even a waste by-product of the workings of the planet..


So you're saying oil is Mother Earths liquid diarrhea ?

( Sorry.. yeah I went there)



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 10:38 PM
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Originally posted by JohnPhoenix

Originally posted by fixer1967


I knew years ago. I think that oil is a by-product maybe even a waste by-product of the workings of the planet..


So you're saying oil is Mother Earths liquid diarrhea ?

( Sorry.. yeah I went there)


Yes, that is what I think. And maybe BP should be pumping Imodium AD down that well shaft. And I guess that would make humans the Dung Beatles of planet Earth. The whole fossil fuel thing just never added up for me.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 10:55 PM
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Isn't oil biodegradable? And there are bacteria that eat oil too! BP needs to just spread fertilizer in the gulf and watch nature work.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 11:06 PM
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Originally posted by Throwback
Isn't oil biodegradable? And there are bacteria that eat oil too! BP needs to just spread fertilizer in the gulf and watch nature work.


I know oil will kill creatures, but too much fertilizer will spawn too many little organisms that will use up all the oxygen and create deadzones.



posted on Jun, 25 2010 @ 11:15 PM
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Originally posted by freetree64
If oil has been produced by the earth, why wouldn't the earth be able to eventually absorb it? Seriously....


A lot of devastating things can happen "naturally".The methane gas release that killed so many people in africa was a natural occurrence. So "natural" doesn't mean it won't kill any wildlife.

There are natural oil seeps. And bacteria can digest the oil.

The problem with the huge leak is the volume of oil is too large for such a small bacteria population to suddenly digest.

But I think they should be putting oil eating bacteria into the oil spill instead of toxic chemicals:

Naturally Occuring Bacteria Could Help Clean Oil Spill


it turns out one of the keys to cleanup might already exist in the now oil-infested waters. Natural microbes present in every ocean are superb cleaners, and with the addition of a bit of fertilizer they could prove successful in removing oil from the Gulf. A quick dusting would help the microbes multiply and then they would dine on oil en masse until it’s gone.






[edit on 25-6-2010 by Arbitrageur]



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 12:53 AM
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reply to post by exlibertateveritas
 


Probably already dead zones by now. But I think it's too much oil anyway. The bacteria solution is probably just for beaches, coasts, etc.



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 01:37 AM
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Originally posted by freetree64
If oil has been produced by the earth, why wouldn't the earth be able to eventually absorb it? Seriously....


Because it is not meant to be anywhere but where it is naturally... within the earth. "Oil" has an electrical and mechanical function within the earth. It conducts vibrations equally throughout the interior of the earth and all living planets. By extracting "oil", you're effectively disrupting what could be considered the "blood pressure" of the earth.

To save you some effort:

Q: "Source? What do you have to back up these claims?"

A: None.



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 01:48 AM
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The Earth CAN and DOES resorb crude oil naturally.

There are different grades of crude that vary in density, mainly, but they all degrade over time upon exposure to air and water. There are places in the Earth's crust where crude oil comes right to the surface, as well as through the sea floor, leaking straight into the water column.

This has been going on for hundreds of millions of years before Mankind ever evolved. It's nothing new.

— Doc Velocity



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 01:54 AM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur
A lot of devastating things can happen "naturally".The methane gas release that killed so many people in africa was a natural occurrence. So "natural" doesn't mean it won't kill any wildlife.

You're talking about the Lake Nyos incident, in which about 1800 people died in their sleep overnight from suffocation.

But that wasn't Methane. It was a big, heavy cloud of Carbon Dioxide emitted from the lake due to a volcanic magma pocket.

— Doc Velocity





[edit on 6/26/2010 by Doc Velocity]



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:00 AM
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Can someone enlighten me, please?

Oil seems to be urgently needed on earth, for engines etc. If it were not so urgently needed, we would not have mega rich oil barons.

On the other hand, if it is so toxic, what are we doing?

And I always understood that oil was a fossil fuel - otherwise, what creates it?

I would appreciate some answers, thanks.



posted on Jun, 26 2010 @ 02:15 AM
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Originally posted by freetree64If Oil Occurs Naturally As A Fossil Fuel, Why doesn't it break down naturally?

If oil has been produced by the earth, why wouldn't the earth be able to eventually absorb it? Seriously....


You have a few things going on in your query.
1) You state oil occurs naturally.
2) You state oil occurs as a fossil fuel.
3) You ask why it doesn't break down naturally.
4) You assume Earth can't deal with it: "...earth be able to eventually absorb it...."

So-
1) Oil does occur naturally. Otherwise, it wouldn't be here.
2) One of the oldest known rock formations on Earth is near Hudson Bay, Canada, dated to 3.8 Billion years ago. One could rather safely assume that rocks in, around and beneath that are at least relatively, similarly aged, possibly even older. So why would there be oil, natural gas and such, located there, beneath rocks that were around before there were plants (around 1200 million years ago)?
3) It breaks down naturally. But "natural" takes time. It took millions of years to make it, right?

4) Earth can, and will, and has dealt with it. Oil seeps to the surface every day and has done so for at least as long as there has been people there to watch it... probably longer considering formations like the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, California and the bones they pull up from it.

People like to think of "Human Kind" as some sort of virus infecting the planet... but everything on Earth has infected the Earth. We are all symbiotes living off the resources our host provides, as we all have symbiotes within us.
Are you Darwinian, survival of the fittest? Could you not interpret that as "the ones that make the best use of the environment" live the longest? Sometimes, the best use of the environment, ensuring survival, is changing the environment.


I find it far more than a little bit ironic that the harder we try to get away from Earth's intrinsic, endemic, "natural" energy sources, the more extreme the emergencies become.




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